H1 (classification)

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H1 is a Paralympic cycling classification. The UCI recommends this be coded as MH1 or WH1.[1]

Definition[edit]

Functional mobility range of an H1 classified cyclist

PBS defined this classification as "Handcycle 1 (H1) is for athletes with severe loss of trunk stability and leg function, and severely impaired upper limb function."[2] In 2012, UCI defined this classification broadly as: "Tetraplegia C6 or above and severe athetosis / ataxia / dystonia".[3] The Telegraph defined this classification in 2011 as "H 1-4: Athletes on handcycles, with lower limb dysfunctions and limited stability" [4]

The cycle[edit]

An AP2 handcycle

This classification can use an AP2 recumbent, which is a competition cycle that is reclined at 30 degrees and has a rigid frame. This classification can also use an AP3 hand cycle which is inclined at 0 degrees and is reclined on a rigid competition frame.[5]

Classification history[edit]

Cycling first became a Paralympic sport at the 1988 Summer Paralympics.[6] In September 2006, governance for para-cycling passed from the International Paralympic Committee's International Cycling Committee to UCI at a meeting in Switzerland. When this happened, the responsibility of classifying the sport also changed.[7]

Rankings[edit]

The following are the men's rankings for this classification As of June 2012:[8]

Rank Name Nation Points References
1 (1) Rodolph Cecillon France 67 [8]
2 (-) Mark Rohan Ireland 63 [8]
3 (-) Yakov Lion Israel 63 [8]
4 (3) Christoph Hindricq Belgium 59 [8]
5 (-) Wolfgang Schattauer Austria 54 [8]
6 (5) Patrick Pascal France 53 [8]
7 (-) Robert LabbÉ Canada 52 [8]
8 (2) Alain Quittet France 47 [8]
9 (-) Tobias Fankhauser Switzerland 40 [8]
10 (4) Christophe Marchal France 18 [8]
11 (-) Martin KovÁr Czech Republic 17 [8]
12 (-) Christoph Etzlstorfer Austria 17 [8]
13 (-) Pavel FoltÝn Czech Republic 6 [8]
13 (-) Omar Rizzato Italy 6 [8]
15 (-) Torben BrÖer Germany 5 [8]
16 (-) Attilio Cortello Italy 4 [8]
17 (-) Ivano Da Canal Italy 3 [8]
17 (-) Federico Villa Italy 3 [8]

Becoming classified[edit]

Classification is handled by Union Cycliste Internationale.[9] Classification for the UCI Para-Cycling World Championships is completed by at least two classification panels. Members of the classification panel must not have a relationship with the cyclist and must not be involved in the World Championships in any other role than as classifier.[10] In national competitions, the classification is handled by the national cycling federation.[10] Classification often has three components: physical, technical and observation assessment.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "UCI Para-cycling Classification Guide". UCI. 17 April 2012. p. 4. 
  2. ^ "Competition at the Highest Levels, Cycling". Cycling. Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  3. ^ "UCI Para-cycling Classification Guide". UCI. 17 April 2012. p. 11. 
  4. ^ "London 2012 Paralympics: Road cycling guide". London: The Telegraph. 2011. Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  5. ^ Vanlandewijck, Yves; Thompson, Walter R; IOC Medical Commission (2011). The paralympic athlete : handbook of sports medicine and science. Handbook of sports medicine and science. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. p. 34. ISBN 9781444334043. OCLC 642278479. 
  6. ^ "Cycling". 2012. Retrieved Australian Paralympic Committee. 
  7. ^ "Para-cycling High Performance". Australia: Cycling Australia. Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "H1 - Road Ranking". UCI. June 2012. Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  9. ^ "Guide to the Paralympic Games – Appendix 1". London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games. 2011. p. 42. Retrieved 9 April 2012. 
  10. ^ a b c "UCI Para-cycling Classification Guide". UCI. 17 April 2012. p. 5.