HD 114762 b

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Not to be confused with HD 114762's stellar companion, HD 114762 B.
HD 114762 b[1]
Extrasolar planet List of extrasolar planets
Parent star
Star HD 114762
Constellation Coma Berenices
Right ascension (α) 13h 12m 19.7427s
Declination (δ) +17° 31′ 01.643″
Apparent magnitude (mV) 7.3
Distance 132.4 ly
(40.6 pc)
Spectral type F9V
Orbital elements
Semimajor axis (a) 0.353 ± 0.001[2] AU
Eccentricity (e) 0.3354 ± 0.0048[2]
Orbital period (P) 83.9151 ± 0.0030[2] d
Argument of
periastron
(ω) 201.28 ± 1.01[2]°
Time of periastron (T0) 2,449,889.106 ± 0.186[2] JD
Semi-amplitude (K) 612.48 ± 3.52[2] m/s
Physical characteristics
Minimum mass (m sin i) 11.069 ± 0.063[3] MJ
Discovery information
Discovery date 1989
Discoverer(s) David Latham, et al.
Discovery method Doppler spectroscopy
Discovery status Confirmed
Database references
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data
SIMBAD data
Exoplanet Archive data
Open Exoplanet Catalogue data

HD 114762 b (nicknamed Latham's Planet) is a massive gaseous[4][5] extrasolar planet,[6] approximately 132 light-years (40.6 pc) away in the constellation of Coma Berenices.[1][4] This optically undetected companion to the late F-type main-sequence star HD 114762 was discovered in 1989 by Latham, et al.,[5] and confirmed in 1991 by Cochran, et al.[7] Depending on inclination angle its lowest possible mass is 11 times Jupiter, and its highest mass around 145 times Jupiter. HD 114762 b may be the first extrasolar planet ever detected, predating the 1992 pulsar planets found around PSR B1257+12 and main-sequence yellow dwarf 51 Pegasi.[8][9] The companion orbits its star every 83.9 days and has an orbital eccentricity of 0.34;[2] for comparison, this orbit is similar to that of Mercury but with twice the eccentricity.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Butler, R. P.; Wright, J. T.; Marcy, G. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Vogt, S. S. et al. (2006). "Catalog of Nearby Exoplanets". The Astrophysical Journal 646 (1): pp. 505–522. arXiv:astro-ph/0607493. Bibcode:2006ApJ...646..505B. doi:10.1086/504701. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Kane, Stephen R.; Henry, Gregory W.; Dragomir, Diana; Fischer, Debra A.; Howard, Andrew W. et al. (2011). "Revised Orbit and Transit Exclusion for HD 114762b". The Astrophysical Journal Letters 735 (2). L41. arXiv:1106.1434. Bibcode:2011ApJ...735L..41K. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/735/2/L41. 
  3. ^ Wang, Sharon Xuesong; Wright, Jason T.; Cochran, William; Kane, Stephen R.; Henry, Gregory W. et al. (2012). "The Discovery of HD 37605c and a Dispositive Null Detection of Transits of HD 37605b". The Astrophysical Journal 761 (1): pp. 46–59. arXiv:1210.6985. Bibcode:2012ApJ...761...46W. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/1/46. 
  4. ^ a b North, Gerald (2003). Astronomy in Depth. New York: Springer. p. 185. ISBN 9781852335809. 
  5. ^ a b Latham, David W.; Mazeh, Tsevi; Stefanik, Robert P.; Mayor, Michel; Burki, Gilbert (1989). "The unseen companion of HD114762: a probable brown dwarf". Nature 339 (6219): pp. 38–40. Bibcode:1989Natur.339...38L. doi:10.1038/339038a0. 
  6. ^ "HD 114762b -- Extra-solar Confirmed Planet". SIMBAD. Retrieved 31 August 2014. 
  7. ^ a b Cochran, William D.; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hancock, Terry J. (10 October 1991). "Constraints on the Companion Object to HD 114762". The Astrophysical Journal 380: L35–L38. Bibcode:1991ApJ...380L..35C. doi:10.1086/186167. 
  8. ^ Hale, Alan (1995). "On the Nature of the Companion to HD 114762". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (The University of Chicago Press) 107 (707): pp. 22–26. Bibcode:1995PASP..107...22H. doi:10.1086/133511. JSTOR 40680489. 
  9. ^ Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Butler, R. Paul; Vogt, Steven S.; Fischer, Debra; Liu, Michael C. (1999). "Two New Candidate Planets in Eccentric Orbits". The Astrophysical Journal 520 (1): pp. 239–247. arXiv:astro-ph/9904275. Bibcode:1999ApJ...520..239M. doi:10.1086/307451. 

Coordinates: Sky map 13h 12m 19.7427s, +17° 31′ 01.643″