HD 142

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
HD 142
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Phoenix[1]
Right ascension 00h 06m 19.18s[2]
Declination –49° 04′ 30.7″[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) 5.711 ± 0.003[3]
Characteristics
Spectral type F7 V[4]
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: 575.29 ± 0.33[2] mas/yr
Dec.: –39.19 ± 0.34[2] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 38.89 ± 0.37[2] mas
Distance 83.9 ± 0.8 ly
(25.7 ± 0.2 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 3.66 ± 0.02[5]
Details
Mass 1.25 ± 0.10[6] M
Radius 1.41 ± 0.11[6] R
Luminosity 2.9[6] L
Surface gravity (log g) 4.34 ± 0.14[6] cgs
Temperature 6,338 ± 46[6] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] 0.03 ± 0.04[6] dex
Age 2.5[6] Gyr
Other designations
CD -49 14337, HIP 522, HR 6, SAO 214963,[7]

HD 142 is a 6th magnitude yellow-white dwarf star approximately 84 light years away[2] in the constellation of Phoenix. A companion star was detected in 1894 making this a binary star system.[8] The binary companion was confirmed in 2007 and determined to be of spectral type K8.5-M1.5 with a mass 59% that of the sun.[9]

Planetary system[edit]

In 2001, the Anglo-Australian Planet Search team led by Chris Tinney announced the discovery of an extrasolar planet orbiting the star.[10][11] An additional linear trend in the radial velocity data was noticed in 2006[12] that could have been due to another planet or to the stellar companion.[13] In 2012, additional measurements allowed the detection of a second planet. A third possible planet with a period of 108 days was seen in the data however the false alarm probability was five percent.[14]

The HD 142 planetary system[14]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
d (unconfirmed) 0.30 MJ 0.469 108.39 0.12
b 1.25 ± 0.15 MJ 1.02 ± 0.03 349.7 ± 1.2 0.17 ± 0.06
c 5.3 ± 0.7 MJ 6.8 ± 0.5 6005 ± 477 0.21 ± 0.07

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roman, Nancy G. (1987). "Identification of a Constellation From a Position". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific 99 (617): 695–699. Bibcode:1987PASP...99..695R. doi:10.1086/132034.  Vizier query form
  2. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357.  Vizier catalog entry
  3. ^ Olsen, E. H. (1994). "Stroemgren photometry of F- and G-type stars brighter than V = 9.6. I. UVBY photometry". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series 106: 257–266. Bibcode:1994A&AS..106..257O.  Vizier catalog entry
  4. ^ Gray, R. O. et al. (July 2006). "Contributions to the Nearby Stars (NStars) Project: Spectroscopy of Stars Earlier than M0 within 40 pc - The Southern Sample". The Astronomical Journal 132 (1): 161–170. arXiv:astro-ph/0603770. Bibcode:2006AJ....132..161G. doi:10.1086/504637. 
  5. ^ Holmberg et al. (2009). "HD 142". Geneva-Copenhagen Survey of Solar neighbourhood III. Retrieved 2010-01-27. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Ghezzi, L. et al. (September 2010), Stellar Parameters and Metallicities of Stars Hosting Jovian and Neptunian Mass Planets: A Possible Dependence of Planetary Mass on Metallicity, The Astrophysical Journal 720 (2): 1290–1302, arXiv:1007.2681, Bibcode:2010ApJ...720.1290G, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/720/2/1290 
  7. ^ "HR 6 -- Double or multiple star". SIMBAD Astronomical Database. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2013-06-23. 
  8. ^ Raghavan, Deepak et al. (2006). "Two Suns in The Sky: Stellar Multiplicity in Exoplanet Systems". The Astrophysical Journal 646 (1): 523–542. arXiv:astro-ph/0603836. Bibcode:2006ApJ...646..523R. doi:10.1086/504823. 
  9. ^ Eggenberger, A. et al. (2007). "The impact of stellar duplicity on planet occurrence and properties I. Observational results of a VLT/NACO search for stellar companions to 130 nearby stars with and without planets". Astronomy and Astrophysics 474 (1): 273–291. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..273E. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20077447. 
  10. ^ "Astronomers close in on Solar System's 'siblings'" (Press release). Marsfield, New South Wales, Australia: Australian Astronomical Observatory. October 15, 2001. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  11. ^ Tinney, C. G. et al. (2002). "Two Extrasolar Planets from the Anglo-Australian Planet Search". The Astrophysical Journal 571 (1): 528–531. arXiv:astro-ph/0111255. Bibcode:2002ApJ...571..528T. doi:10.1086/339916. 
  12. ^ Butler, R. P. et al. (2006). "Catalog of Nearby Exoplanets". The Astrophysical Journal 646 (1): 505–522. arXiv:astro-ph/0607493. Bibcode:2006ApJ...646..505B. doi:10.1086/504701. 
  13. ^ Wright, J. T. et al. (2007). "Four New Exoplanets and Hints of Additional Substellar Companions to Exoplanet Host Stars". The Astrophysical Journal 657 (1): 533–545. arXiv:astro-ph/0611658. Bibcode:2007ApJ...657..533W. doi:10.1086/510553. 
  14. ^ a b Wittenmyer, Robert A. et al. (2012). "The Anglo-Australian Planet Search. XXII. Two New Multi-planet Systems". The Astrophysical Journal 753 (2). 169. arXiv:1205.2765. Bibcode:2012ApJ...753..169W. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/753/2/169. 

External links[edit]

  • "HD 142". Open Exoplanet Catalogue. Retrieved 2014-09-08. 

Coordinates: Sky map 00h 06m 19.18s, −49° 04′ 30.7″