HD 37605

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HD 37605
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Orion
Right ascension 05h 40m 01.729s[1]
Declination +06° 03′ 38.08″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 8.69
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: 53.15 ± 1.29[1] mas/yr
Dec.: −246.44 ± 0.84[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 22.74 ± 1.11[1] mas
Distance 143 ± 7 ly
(44 ± 2 pc)
Characteristics
Spectral type K0 V
Details
Mass 1 ± 0.05 M
Radius 0.901 ± 0.045 R
Luminosity 0.59 ± 0.058 L
Surface gravity (log g) 4.511 ± 0.024 cgs
Temperature 5448 ± 44 K
Metallicity [Fe/H] 0.34 dex
Rotational velocity (v sin i) < 1 (57.67 days) km/s
Age Gyr
Other designations
HIP 26664, LTT 11695, NLTT 15443, SAO 113015
Database references
SIMBAD data
Exoplanet Archive data
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

HD 37605 is an orange dwarf star located approximately 143 light years away[1] in the constellation Orion. It formed about 7 billion years ago and is inactive.[2]

There are two giant planets known in orbit. Planet b was discovered in 2004[3] and planet c was discovered eight years later. The planets do not transit relative to Earth; b's maximum inclination is 88.1%.[2][4]

In a simulation, HD 37605 b's orbit "sweeps clean" most test particles within 0.5 AU; leaving only asteroids "in low-eccentricity orbits near the known planet’s apastron distance, near the 1:2 mean-motion resonance" with oscillating eccentricity up to 0.06, and also at 1:3 with oscillating eccentricity up to 0.4. Also, observation has ruled out planets heavier than 0.7 Jupiter mass with a period of one year or less; which still allows for planets at 0.8 AU or more.[5]

The HD 37605 system[4]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b ≥2.813 ± 0.032 MJ 0.2837 ± 0.0016 55.01307 ± 0.00063 0.6767 ± 0.0019
c ≥3.379 ± 0.038 MJ 3.821 ± 0.022 2720 ± 58 0.013 ± 0.015

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. Vizier catalog entry
  2. ^ a b WANG Sh. et al. (2012). "The Discovery of HD 37605c and a Dispositive Null Detection of Transits of HD 37605b". Astrophysical Journal. arXiv:1210.6985. Bibcode:2012ApJ...761...46W. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/1/46. 
  3. ^ Cochran, Michael et al. (2004). "The First Hobby-Eberly Telescope Planet: A Companion to HD 37605". The Astrophysical Journal Letters 611 (2): L133–L136. arXiv:astro-ph/0407146. Bibcode:2004ApJ...611L.133C. doi:10.1086/423936. 
  4. ^ a b S. Kane (2012). "The TERMS Project: More Than Just Transit Exclusion". OASIS 44 (228.07). 
  5. ^ Wittenmyer et al.; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Levison, Harold F. (2007). "Dynamical and Observational Constraints on Additional Planets in Highly Eccentric Planetary Systems". The Astronomical Journal 134 (3): 1276–1284. arXiv:0706.1962. Bibcode:2007AJ....134.1276W. doi:10.1086/520880. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: Sky map 05h 40m 01.7296s, +06° 03′ 38.085″