HD 90156

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HD 90156
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Hydra
Right ascension 10h 23m 55.275s[1]
Declination –29° 38′ 43.91″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.947
Characteristics
Spectral type G5V
Apparent magnitude (B) 7.572
Apparent magnitude (J) 5.685
Apparent magnitude (H) 5.382
Apparent magnitude (K) 5.245
B−V color index 0.625
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) 26.4 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: –38.02 ± 0.46[1]mas/yr
Dec.: 99.61 ± 0.47[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 44.74 ± 0.49[1] mas
Distance 72.9 ± 0.8 ly
(22.4 ± 0.2 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 5.226
Details
Mass 0.99 M
Radius 0.87 ± 0.05 R
Luminosity 0.698 ± 0.03 L
Temperature 5670 ± 100 K
Metallicity [Fe/H] –0.24 dex
Other designations
CD–29°8316, GCRV , GJ 3597, HIP 50921, PPM 257610, SAO 178771, Gamma Antliae
Database references
SIMBAD data
Exoplanet Archive data
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

HD 90156 is a 7th magnitude G-type main sequence star located approximately 73 light years away[1] in the constellation Hydra. This star is smaller, cooler, fainter, and less massive than our Sun. Also its metal content is over half as much as the Sun. In 2009, a gas giant planet was found in orbit around the star.

This star was designated as Gamma Antliae by Lacaille, and Gould intended to keep it in that constellation. However, the delineating of constellation boundaries in 1930 saw it transferred to Hydra.[2]

The HD 90156 planetary system[3]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b ≥17.98 ± 1.46 M 0.250 ± 0.004 49.77 ± 0.07 0.31 ± 0.10

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. Vizier catalog entry
  2. ^ Wagman, Morton (2003). Lost Stars: Lost, Missing and Troublesome Stars from the Catalogues of Johannes Bayer, Nicholas Louis de Lacaille, John Flamsteed, and Sundry Others. Blacksburg, VA: The McDonald & Woodward Publishing Company. p. 29. ISBN 978-0-939923-78-6. 
  3. ^ Mordasini, C. et al. (2011). "The HARPS search for southern extrasolar planets XXIV. Companions to HD 85390, HD 90156, and HD 103197: a Neptune analog and two intermediate-mass planets". Astronomy and Astrophysics 526. A111. arXiv:1010.0856. Bibcode:2011A&A...526A.111M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/200913521. 

Coordinates: Sky map 10h 23m 55.2749s, −29° 38′ 43.905″