Hong Kong Special Administrative Region passport

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Hong Kong Special Administrative Region passport
Cover of HKSAR e-Passport.jpg
The front cover of the Hong Kong SAR ePassport issued since February 2007.
Issued by  Hong Kong
Type of document Passport
Eligibility requirements Chinese citizens who are permanent residents of the Hong Kong SAR
Expiration 10 years after acquisition for adults aged 16 or over, 5 for children
Hong Kong Special Administrative Region passport
Traditional Chinese 香港特別行政區護照
The Cover of the 1st and 2nd Versions of the HKSAR Passport (1997–2007).

The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Passport is issued to permanent residents of Hong Kong who are citizens of the People's Republic of China.[1] In accordance with the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, since the transfer of sovereignty on 1 July 1997, the passport has been issued by the Immigration Department of the Government of Hong Kong under the authorisation of the Central People's Government of the People's Republic of China. As the official languages of Hong Kong are Chinese and English, the passport is printed bilingually in both Chinese (traditional characters) and English.

Name[edit]

In English, the passport is sometimes referred to by its long-form name which appears on the cover (i.e. the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region People's Republic of China passport – a literal translation of the Chinese title 中華人民共和國香港特別行政區護照).[2][3][4] Alternatively, the passport is commonly referred to as the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region passport (Chinese: 香港特別行政區護照)[1][5] (the Hong Kong legislative ordinance concerning the passport is titled the "Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Passports Ordinance (Chapter 539)",[6] the Hong Kong SAR passport,[7][8][9][10][11] the HKSAR passport[1][12][13] or the Hong Kong passport.[14]

Although a number of foreign authorities may refer to Hong Kong SAR passports as "Hong Kong passports" – "香港護照" in Chinese – few Hong Kong people do, in recognition of the historical complexity and range of travel documents for Hong Kong residents. Most frequently, the Hong Kong SAR passport is known as "特區護照"[15] – a literal translation in English would be "SAR passport".

The authorities of the Republic of China (commonly known as "Taiwan") refer to the Hong Kong SAR passport as the "Hong Kong passport" because the ROC government tries to avoid references to the political status of Hong Kong as a SAR of the People's Republic of China.[16]

The Brazilian Consulate-General in Hong Kong uses the term "Hong Kong passport" in reference to both the Hong Kong SAR and British National (Overseas) passports.[17]

Historical background[edit]

The issuing of Hong Kong SAR passports began on 1 July 1997, following the transfer of sovereignty over Hong Kong from the United Kingdom to the People's Republic of China.[citation needed]

PRC citizens who have right of abode in the HKSAR and who hold Hong Kong permanent resident identity cards, whether or not they are holders of British National (Overseas) passport or Hong Kong Certificate of Identity or other travel documents, are eligible to apply for the Hong Kong SAR passport. Note that acquisition of British citizenship in the British Nationality Selection Scheme itself does not affect the eligibility for a HKSAR passport. Nor does the holding of any foreign passport itself affect the eligibility for a HKSAR passport, provided that one remains a PRC citizen.[citation needed]

Under Hong Kong Basic Law, the Government of Hong Kong is responsible for immigration control in the territory. The Hong Kong SAR passport is issued by the Immigration Department of Hong Kong under the authorisation of the Central People's Government (or the State Council). Its design is distinct from other types of People's Republic of China passports and the holders enjoy visa-free entry to more countries than other PRC passports.[citation needed]

Hong Kong official travel documents prior to 1997 included the Hong Kong Certificate of Identity (CI), British Dependent Territories Citizen (BDTC), British National (Overseas) (BN(O)) and British Citizen (BC) passports. After 1997, BN(O) and BC passports are still valid but CIs and BDTC passports are no longer in use.[citation needed]

The number of Hong Kong SAR passports in circulation by year is as follows:[18]

  • 2010: 4,261,263
  • 2009: 4,088,337
  • 2008: 3,934,288
  • 2007: 3,920,780
  • 2006: 3,670,115
  • 2005: 3,326,200
  • 2004: 2,959,900

Eligibility and application[edit]

The eligibility criteria for application for a Hong Kong SAR passport include:

In comparison with the British National (Overseas) passport, the Hong Kong SAR passport's application fees are much lower. When applying in Hong Kong, a British National (Overseas) passport costs £128 (32 pages), £154.50 (48 pages) and £81.50 (child) – this equates to HK$1536, HK$1854 and HK$978 respectively.[20] In comparison with other Chinese passports, when applying from Hong Kong, the People's Republic of China passport costs HK$430,[21] whilst the Macao SAR passport costs MOP370/HK$359.[22]

Physical appearance[edit]

Since the issuing of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Passport commenced on 1 July 1997 following the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kong, the passport has undergone three different changes, each with security enhancements. In February 2007, the first ePassport was introduced. The design conforms with the document design recommendations of the International Civil Aviation Organization. The new ePassport featured in the 2008 Stockholm Challenge Event and was a finalist for the Stockholm Challenge Award in the Public Administration categeory. The Hong Kong SAR ePassport design was praised on account of the "multiple state-of-the-art technologies [which] are seamlessly integrated in the sophisticated Electronic Passport System (e-Passport System)".[23] The cover of the new biometric passport remains essentially the same as that of previous versions, with the addition of the biometric passport logo at the bottom.[24]

Current version (biometric passport)[edit]

In 2006, the Immigration Department announced that Unihub Limited (a PCCW subsidiary company heading a consortium of suppliers, including Keycorp) had won the tender to provide the technology to produce biometric passports.[25] In February 2007, the first ePassport was introduced. The cover of the new biometric passport remains essentially the same as that of previous versions. The biometric passport symbol EPassport logo.svg appears at the bottom under the word "PASSPORT". However, the design of the inner pages has changed substantially.

Inside front cover[edit]

Inner front cover of the ePassport

On the inner front cover of the passport, below the crest of the People's Republic of China and above a picture of the Great Wall of China are the following words:

中華人民共和國外交部請各國軍政機關對持照人予以通行的便利和必要的協助
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic of China requests all civil and military authorities of foreign countries to allow the bearer of this passport to pass freely and afford assistance in case of need.

On the reverse of the polycarbonate identification page insert is a blue image with the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region emblem in the centre. At the top is a pattern of the words "中華人民共和國香港特別行政區 HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA". At the bottom is a picture of Victoria Harbour behind an outline of the Great Wall of China.

Identification page[edit]

The identification page of the ePassport

The identification page appears on a polycarbonate insert between the front cover and the first page. Using laser engraving technology, the holder's photograph is printed in black and white, with the holder's Hong Kong Permanent Identity Card number printed vertically on the right-hand side of the portrait photograph. The passport is also machine readable, designed for immigration control points equipped with passport scanners. Details which are printed include:[24]

  • Travel document type: P
  • Code of Issuing State: CHN
  • Passport number
  • Surname and Given Names: in traditional Chinese characters and English
  • Nationality: "CHINESE" (The nationality code is CHN as shown in the machine readable zone)
  • Sex: denoted as "M" (male) or "F" (female)
  • Place of birth: if born in China, the name of the province/autonomous region/municipality in which the bearer was born; if born in Hong Kong or Macao, 'Hong Kong' or 'Macao'; if born in other countries, the name of the country of birth
  • Dates of birth, issuance and expiry: displayed in the format DD-MMM-YY
  • Authority (of issue): "IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT, HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION" (in traditional Chinese characters and English)

The code "CHN" (China) is used for both issuing state and nationality. This is the same as PRC passport and Macau SAR passport. (It is worth noting that during the British colonial era, a Hong Kong British Dependent Territories Citizen passport used "HKG" as the code of the issuing state and "GBD" as the nationality code).

Instead of printing the holder's signature on the identification/observation pages, space is reserved on the last page of the passport below the emergency contact information for the holder to complete his/her signature.

Security features[edit]
The identification page of the ePassport under UV light

Enveloping the top right hand corner of the portrait photograph, and the surname, given names and nationality data sections is a kinegram, consisting of an amalgamation of the Chinese and Hong Kong flags, and the letters "HK香港". In the middle of the identification page is a multiple laser image consisting of two circles: in the left hand circle is another image of the holder's portrait photograph, at the bottom of which is the passport number; in the right hand circle is the Hong Kong regional flag (the red and white reverse gradually as the viewing angle is changed).[24]

The Hong Kong permanent identity card number is printed at the bottom right hand side of the portrait photograph as a trapezium shape which gradually widens towards the bottom. The three waves at the bottom of the portrait photograph, as well as the straight line separating the machine readable zone from the rest of the data page and the vertical straight line of the right hand column of Tsing Ma Bridge, contains micro-lettering of the holder's English name, Hong Kong permanent identity card number and date of birth.[24]

The background of the identification page changes under ultraviolet light, when a scene of the Tsing Ma Bridge with nighttime fireworks becomes visible. The identification page also contains an engraving of a bauhinia, but with certain lines replaced by microlettering consisting of "HKSAR".[24]

Inner pages[edit]

Pages 12 and 13 (with a seasonal flower printed across both pages)
Pages 11 and 14 rolled up to meet each other (with the seasonal flower printed on separate pages matching up)
The inner pages of the 32-page ePassport
The inner pages of the 48-page ePassport

All the inner pages have seasonal flowers at the side, and different "華" characters in the centre (in English this means "Chinese"). As well as being printed in red at the bottom of each page, the passport number is perforated through the top section of all the odd-numbered pages. At the bottom of each page is a gold outline of the Great Wall of China. The seasonal flower is printed across the middle of even-numbered and odd-numbered pages. When two pages are rolled up such that they meet each other, the seasonal flower on the right margin of odd-numbered page matches up with the flower on the left margin of the even-numbered page (e.g. pages 11 and 14), forming a complete bunch of flowers.

The observations page, located on page 1, contains a photograph of the holder. If the passport is issued through a Chinese foreign mission, the embassy/consulate will make an endorsement in the observations stating so.

The explanatory notes on the passport are placed on the second last page of the passport, and read as follows-

  1. The issuance, replacement, reissuance and endorsement of this passport shall be effected by the Immigration Department of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, diplomatic and consular missions of the People's Republic of China in foreign countries, or other Chinese authorities in foreign countries under the entrustment of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic of China.
  2. The bearer of this passport is a Chinese citizen who holds a Hong Kong permanent identity card (HKPIC) and has the right of abode in and the right to return to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.
  3. This passport is valid for ten years, unless otherwise stated. This passport is normally valid for five years if issued to a child under sixteen years of age. This passport shall be replaced by a new one when its validity period has expired or it has no further space for visas.
  4. This passport is an important document of identity which shall be kept carefully and used properly. It shall not multilated, tampered with, or transferred to another person for unlawful use. Any case of loss or destruction should be immediately reported to the nearest issuing authority and the local police or public security authorities.

The last page of the passport has a section to be filled in by the holder with contact information in the event of an emergency, as well as a space for the holder to complete his/her signature.

Contactless biometric data chip[edit]

Data included in the contactless chip of the passport:[26]

  • Name in Chinese and English
  • Nationality (i.e. Chinese)
  • Sex
  • Date of birth
  • Place of birth
  • Permanent Hong Kong identity card number
  • Facial image
  • Passport number
  • Date of issue
  • Date of expiry
  • Issuing authority (i.e. Immigration Department, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region)

Fingerprints and iris scans are not included.

The explanation from back cover for the chip is as follows:

本護照含敏感的電子部件,為保持護照的最佳效能,請勿彎曲護照或在本頁打孔;切勿讓本護照接觸高低溫或受潮。
This passport contains sensitive electronics. For the best performance please do not bend, perforate this page or expose this passport to extreme temperatures or excess moisture.
請勿在此蓋印
Do not stamp here

Second Version (2003–2007)[edit]

Starting from 1 January 2003, the second version of the passport was introduced with enhanced security features. The passport was machine readable, designed for immigration control points equipped with passport scanners. The passport size was 125 mm × 88 mm. The second version of the Hong Kong SAR passport was available either as a 32-page ordinary-size passport or as a 48-page passport.

Front cover[edit]

The cover of the passport was dark blue with wording and the national emblem of the People's Republic of China in gold. The word Passport in Traditional Chinese and English are found below the crest. Above are the words Hong Kong Special Administrative Region People's Republic of China, also in Traditional Chinese and English. It is worth noting that the Chinese characters 中華人民共和國 (People's Republic of China) are bigger than the characters 香港特別行政區 (Hong Kong Special Administrative Region) on the passport cover. In English, however, "HONG KONG" is bigger than the phrase "SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA" for easy distinction by foreign immigration officials.

Inner front cover[edit]

Inner front cover of the Second Version Hong Kong SAR Passport

The passport note appeared on the second page in Chinese (Traditional characters) and English:

中華人民共和國外交部請各國軍政機關對持照人予以通行的便利和必要的協助
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic of China requests all civil and military authorities of foreign countries to allow the bearer of this passport to pass freely and afford assistance in case of need.

Inner pages[edit]

Visa pages of the Second Version Hong Kong SAR Passport

The passport's observations page on page 3 had the following:

  • the holder's Hong Kong Permanent Identity Card number, and the Chinese Commercial Code of the holder's Chinese name
  • if the passport was issued through a Chinese foreign mission, the embassy/consulate would also make an endorsement in the observations stating so.
  • an official chop by the Immigration Department
  • a machine-readable barcode

The passport's explanatory notes were on page 1 in Chinese, and on page 2 in English. They consisted of the following words:

  1. The issuance, replacement, reissuance and endorsement of this passport shall be effected by the Immigration Department of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, diplomatic and consular missions of the People's Republic of China in foreign countries, or other Chinese authorities in foreign countries under the entrustment of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic of China.
  2. The bearer of this passport is a Chinese citizen who holds a Hong Kong permanent identity card and has the right of abode in and the right to return to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.
  3. This passport is valid for ten years, unless otherwise stated. This passport is normally valid for five years if issued to a child under sixteen years of age. This passport shall be replaced by a new one when its validity period has expired or it has no further space for visas.
  4. This passport is an important document of identity which shall be kept carefully and used properly. It shall not multilated, tampered with, or transferred to another person for unlawful use. Any case of loss or destruction should be immediately reported to the nearest issuing authority and the local police or public security authorities.

Identification page[edit]

Personal data was recorded on the inner rear cover of the passport, which was covered with a security laminate. Details included were:

  • Travel document type: P
  • Code of Issuing State: CHN (People's Republic of China)
  • Passport number
  • Surname and Given Names: in Traditional Chinese and English
  • Nationality: "CHINESE" (The nationality code is CHN as shown in the machine readable zone)
  • Sex: denoted as "M" (male) or "F" (female)
  • Place of birth: if born in China, name of province/autonomous region/municipality; if born in Hong Kong or Macao, 'Hong Kong' or 'Macao'; if born in other countries, name of country
  • Dates of birth, issue and expiry: displayed in the format DD-MMM-YY
  • Authority (of issue): "IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT, HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION" (in Traditional Chinese and English)

There was also a machine readable zone at the bottom of the identification page.

Changes from the first version included optically variable ink used to print the letters "HKSAR" along the left hand side of the photo and the words "IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT, HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION" in the "Issuing authority" section of the personal data page.

First version (1997–2002)[edit]

The first version of the Hong Kong SAR Passport was issued from 1 July 1997 until 31 January 2007.

Use[edit]

China[edit]

Mainland China[edit]

The Hong Kong SAR passport is not accepted for travel between Hong Kong and Mainland China. Instead, those who are eligible for a Hong Kong SAR passport are also eligible to apply for a Home Return Permit via the Public Security Bureau of Guangdong Province (represented in Hong Kong by the China Travel Service). The possession of a Hong Kong SAR passport does not guarantee the issuing of a Home Return Permit; several pro-democracy advocates, for example, have been refused Home Return Permits or had their permits confiscated.[27]

Macao SAR[edit]

The Hong Kong SAR passport is only accepted as a valid travel document for a maximum visa exempt stay of 7 days when the holder is transiting through Macao to a third country. Otherwise, a Hong Kong permanent identity card should be used, enabling visa-free entry for a maximum stay of one year.[28]

Taiwan[edit]

Hong Kong SAR passport holders who have either visited Taiwan previously or who were born in Hong Kong or Macao are able to obtain a 30-day entry permit online at the website of the National Immigration Agency which can be used for a single entry to Taiwan within three months of the application date. Once the permit has been granted online, the applicant must print it out to be presented at the border checkpoint with a Hong Kong SAR passport with at least 6 months' validity and a return flight/ferry ticket.[29]

Hong Kong SAR passport holders can also obtain a 30-day entry permit upon arrival in Taiwan at the border checkpoint on presentation of their Hong Kong Permanent Identity Card as well as their Hong Kong SAR or British National (Overseas) passport, as long as they were born in Hong Kong. A fee of NT$300 is incurred for each application.[30]

Alternatively, they can apply for an entry visa in advance through Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Hong Kong at a cost of HK$75, which is valid for 3 months from the date of issuance, permitting the holder to enter Taiwan twice, each time for a maximum stay of 30 days.[30]

Overseas[edit]

Hong Kong SAR passport holders can enter many countries visa-free, including all member states of the European Union, Brazil, Canada, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Russia, Singapore, South Africa and South Korea. The official figure of the Hong Kong Immigration Department states that 150 countries and territories grant Hong Kong SAR passport holders either visa-free or visa-on-arrival treatment as of 25 March 2014 (though this figure excludes countries and territories not officially recognised by the People's Republic of China, e.g. Kosovo and Taiwan).[31] According the Henley and Partners Visa Restrictions Index, in 2014 the passport was ranked 14 out of 219, placing it the top 20 (for any given rank, often several countries are tied at that rank). A non-SAR PRC passport was ranked 82 out of 219.[32]

With regards to Schengen Agreement signatory states, Hong Kong SAR passport holders are also permitted to take up a paid activity (e.g. work) visa-free for a maximum of 90 days within a 180-day period in Belgium, Denmark, Iceland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia and Sweden.[33] In Switzerland, another Schengen signatory state, Hong Kong SAR passport holders are able to exercise a "gainful occupation" for a maximum of 8 days during their 90 days visa-exempt stay without the need to apply for a special work visa.[2] However, this 8-day visa exemption excludes gainful occupation in the primary or secondary construction industry, civil engineering, catering and hotel services, industrial and private cleaning industry, surveillance and security services and sex industry. Alternatively, if in possession of a long term residence permit issued by any other Schengen member state, the Hong Kong SAR passport holder can exercise a gainful occupation for up to 3 months visa-free in Switzerland (without the industry-specific restrictions listed in the 8-day visa exemption).[2]

As Chinese citizens, those travelling on Hong Kong SAR passports are entitled to the consular protection offered by the People's Republic of China government while overseas. However, it is not uncommon for PRC authorities overseas to offer consular assistance to PRC citizens of Hong Kong origin travelling on their British National (Overseas) passports, as their British nationality is not recognised by the Chinese government. See also British consular protection enjoyed by BN(O) passport holders outside the PRC and the UK.[citation needed]

Hong Kong SAR passport holders are also able to enjoy travel convenience under some bilateral agreements concluded between the PRC and other countries (on PRC passports in general). For example, holders of PRC passport and that of HKSAR passport are exempt from the fee for Nepalese tourist visas.[citation needed]

On 10 April 2013, the Prime Minister of Australia, Julia Gillard, announced that, starting from 2015, holders of Hong Kong SAR e-passports would be able to use SmartGates in Australia on a trial basis.[34][35]

Visa waiver reciprocity[edit]

In some cases, Hong Kong SAR passport holders are subject to visa requirements to countries whose nationals can enter Hong Kong visa-free. For example, American and Indian nationals can enter Hong Kong visa-free for a maximum period of 90 and 14 days respectively, though Hong Kong SAR passport holders are required to apply for a visa for any visit to the United States or India.[36]

Also, Hong Kong SAR passport holders may be given less favourable visa-free conditions by certain countries, compared to the conditions offered by Hong Kong to those countries' nationals

Conversely, in some situations, Hong Kong SAR passport holders enjoy better visa waiver conditions to countries whose nationals are subject to stricter conditions entering Hong Kong. Hong Kong SAR passport holders enjoy a visa-free stay of up to 90 days to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia and Rwanda, although nationals of these countries are only granted a maximum visa-free stay of 14 days in Hong Kong.[36]

In some cases, Hong Kong SAR passport holders are offered visa-free access to countries whose nationals are unable to travel to Hong Kong visa-free for any length of time. An example is Nicaragua, to which Hong Kong SAR passport holders can travel visa-free for a maximum period of 90 days.[37] However, Nicaraguans must apply for a visa to travel to Hong Kong.[36]

Comparison of visa-free access[edit]

The total land area Hong Kong SAR passport holders enjoy visa-free access to exceeds 87 million square kilometres after the visa-free access agreement with Russia.

The Hong Kong Immigration Department cites the number of countries and territories offering visa-free access for Hong Kong SAR passport holders as 146 (this figure excludes countries and territories not officially recognised by the People's Republic of China, e.g. Kosovo and Taiwan).[38] The British Consulate-General in Hong Kong states 119 as the number of countries and territories providing visa-free access to British National (Overseas) passport holders.[39]

Hong Kong residents staying in the United Kingdom for 6 months or more and entering on a British National (Overseas) passport are exempt from having to register with the police, whilst entry on a Hong Kong SAR passport does not exempt them from this administrative procedure, with a police registration fee of £34 payable. In this sense, Hong Kong SAR passports are treated in the same way as ordinary Chinese passports.[40][41] For travel to Dominica, Grenada and Morocco, entry on a British National (Overseas) passport permits a longer visa-free stay than on a HKSAR passport – 6 months compared to 21 days, 6 months compared to 3 months, and 3 months compared to 30 days respectively. Whilst entry on a HKSAR passport to Nauru requires a visa to be obtained in advance, a BN(O) passport holder can obtain a 30-day visa on arrival free of charge.

However, Hong Kong SAR passport holders enjoy better visa-free access to Australia than British National (Overseas) passports. Whilst both passports are eligible for the Electronic Travel Authority scheme, BN(O) passport holders can only apply for an ETA in person at an Australian visa office or through a travel agent/airline, whilst Hong Kong SAR passport holders can apply online at the ETA official website.[42] Entry to Indonesia on a HKSAR passport permits a visa-free stay of 30 days whilst on a BN(O) passport a 30-day visa must be purchased on arrival at a cost of USD25. Similarly, HKSAR passport holders are eligible to obtain a visa on arrival in Lebanon and the United Arab Emirates, whilst BN(O) passport holders are ineligible.

In comparison with other Chinese passports, the Hong Kong SAR passport provides considerably more visa-free access than the ordinary People's Republic of China passport, the Macao Special Administrative Region passport. The Republic of China passport, however, has about an equal amount of visa-free regimes as the HKSAR passport.

Working holiday visas[edit]

As a result of bilateral working holiday visa agreements made between the Government of Hong Kong and a number of other countries, Hong Kong SAR passport holders aged between 18 and 30 are eligible to apply for working holiday visas to Australia,[43] Canada,[44] France,[45] Germany,[46] Ireland,[47] Japan,[48] New Zealand[49] and South Korea.[50] These visas allow their holders to spend a maximum of 12 months in the foreign country with the primary purpose of travelling, but also permitting supplementary short-term employment (and for some countries (e.g. South Korea), short-term study may in addition be allowed). On the basis of reciprocity, Australian, Canadian, French, German, Irish, Japanese, New Zealand and South Korean nationals are also able to apply for working holiday visas in Hong Kong under similar conditions.[51]

HKSAR passport holders have been eligible for UK working holiday visas, subject to Certificate of Sponsorship and annual maximum of 1000 placements since January 2014.[52] However, holders of a British National (Overseas) passport are not subject to any quotas nor Certificate of Sponsorship under the same Scheme.[53]

Incidents[edit]

Lai Changxing incident[edit]

Lai Changxing, the suspect of a large smuggling and corruption scandal in Mainland China, used a HKSAR passport to enter Canada as a tourist in 1999. His HKSAR passport and Hong Kong permanent residency were revoked by the Hong Kong Government in 2002 on the grounds that he had obtained the residency by dishonest means.[citation needed]

"Place of birth" in HKSAR passports[edit]

On 16 April 2008, the Court of First Instance of the High Court of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region decided in an open court to public in the case of Aziz Akbar Butt v Director of Immigration (HCAL32-2007). The Applicant, Aziz Akbar Butt, argued that for HKSAR passport holders born outside the PRC, Hong Kong and Macao, it is not necessary for the Director of Immigration to label their "place of birth" as stated in the HKSAR passport to be the COUNTRY/STATE of birth. Rather, the city or province of birth may suffice. Aziz Akbar Butt, born in Pakistan and being a Hong Kong permanent resident, became a PRC citizen of Hong Kong on 8 January 2007, and holds a HKSAR passport. He claimed to have problems travelling to several countries because of the fact that his HKSAR passport states "Pakistan" (i.e. his country of birth) instead of 'Karachi' or "Sindh" (i.e. his specific place of birth within Pakistan) as his "place of birth". The Director of Immigration, on the other hand, asserted that it is in accordance with law and ICAO standards and in accordance with mainland passport that the "country of birth" should be specified for holders of the HKSAR passport born outside the PRC, Hong Kong and Macao.[54]

The Court of First Instance of the High Court decided that the Director of Immigration was wrong in using a policy to insert the country of birth as the "place of birth" in the applicant's passport in this instance.[55] As a result of this court decision, the Director of Immigration cancelled the passport previously issued to Butt, and replaced it with a new passport at no cost, with his place of birth stated as "Sindh".

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "GovHK: HKSAR Passport". Retrieved 7 January 2010.  Note that: The passport is referred to both as the HKSAR Passport and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Passport.
  2. ^ a b c "Annex 1, List 1: Overview of ID and visa provisions according to nationality (version 15 July 2010)". Federal Office of Migration. 2010. Retrieved 4 August 2010.  Note that: The "Hong Kong Special Administrative Region People's Republic of China Passport (HKSAR Passport)" is valid for a V1 exemption to Switzerland.
  3. ^ "China: travel documents to Finland". Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: The Finnish Government states that the holder of a "passport [of the] Hong Kong Special Administrative Region – People's Republic of China" can enter Finland visa-free.
  4. ^ "Do you need a Visa?". French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: The French Government states that a short stay visa to France is waived for "holders of passports from the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People』s Republic of China".
  5. ^ "Appendix 1 – Visa requirements for the United Kingdom". UK Border Agency. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: In Section 2(d) of Appendix 1 of the United Kingdom Immigration Rules, "nationals or citizens of the People's Republic of China holding passports issued by Hong Kong Special Administrative Region" are eligible for visa-free entry to the UK.
  6. ^ "Department of Justice Bilingual Laws Information System: CAP 539" (PDF). Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  7. ^ "Australian Electronic Travel Authority: Am I eligible?". Australian Government. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: The Australian Government lists the Hong Kong SAR as an ETA-eligible passport.
  8. ^ "Visas". New Zealand Consulate-General Hong Kong. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: The New Zealand Consulate-General in Hong Kong lists the Hong Kong SAR passport as a Hong Kong passport eligible for visa-free entry to New Zealand.
  9. ^ "Applying for a Visa in Hong Kong". German Consulate General Hong Kong. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: The German Consulate General in Hong Kong states that "holders of a Hong Kong S.A.R. passport do not need a visa for Schengen countries up to 90 days in any 6-month period".
  10. ^ "Requirements for entry into Spain and visas". Consulate-General of Spain in Hong Kong. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010. [dead link] Note that: The Consulate-General of Spain in Hong Kong states that Hong Kong SAR passport holders can enter Spain visa-free.
  11. ^ "Schengen visa (short-stay)". Consulate-General of the Czech Republic in Hong Kong. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: The Consulate-General of the Czech Republic in Hong Kong states that "Holders of Hong Kong SAR ... passports are entitled to a visa-free entry to Schengen countries lasting no more than 3 months in any six-month period from the date of first entry in the territory of the Member States.".
  12. ^ "Business & tourist visa (type C)". Consulate-General of Belgium in Hong Kong and Macau. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: The Consulate-General of Belgium in Hong Kong and Macau states that holders of HKSAR passports can enter Belgium visa-free for up to 90 days.
  13. ^ "Who does not need a visa to enter Iceland". Icelandic Directorate of Immigration. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010. [dead link] Note that: The Icelandic Directorate of Immigration website states that "those who carry HKSAR passports" are visa exempt to Iceland.
  14. ^ "Chinese Visa, Passport, Notarization & Authentication". Embassy of the People's Republic of China in the United States of America. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: The Chinese Embassy website uses the term "HongKong Passport".
  15. ^ "特區護照持有人往關島可免簽證". News.hkheadline.com. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  16. ^ "香港澳門居民進入臺灣地區及居留定居許可辦法". National Immigration Agency. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: The National Immigration Agency of Taiwan uses the term 香港護照 (literally in English "Hong Kong passport").
  17. ^ "Entrance Visa in Brazil – by Country". Consulate-General of Brazil in Hong Kong and Macau. 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.  Note that: The Brazilian Government lists Hong Kong as a VITUR and VITEM II Category 8 nationality (visa-free access for 90 days). Although not specifically stated, both the Hong Kong SAR and British National (Overseas) passports are eligible for visa-free access to Brazil (according to the Hong Kong Government [1] and the British Consulate-General in Hong Kong [2]).
  18. ^ Hong Kong Factsheets: Immigration
  19. ^ Who is "eligible for a Hong Kong Special Administrative Region passport"[dead link]
  20. ^ "UK in Hong Kong: Passport fees". Ukinhongkong.fco.gov.uk. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  21. ^ "辦證所需時間和收費標準". Fmcoprc.gov.hk. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  22. ^ "Macao SAR Electronic Passport". Direcção dos Serviços de Identificação. 2010. Retrieved 11 April 2010.  Macao SAR Passport application fee total=MOP300 (normal processing fee) +MOP40 (for HKD bank draft drawn in Hong Kong) +MOP30 (postage fee)
  23. ^ Stockholm Challenge Event 2008: Electronic Passport System[dead link]
  24. ^ a b c d e "GovHKCharacteristics and Security Features of e-Passport". Retrieved 12 April 2010. 
  25. ^ "Hong Kong ePassport deal win for Keycorp". Securitydocumentworld.com. 24 January 2006. Retrieved 6 December 2011. 
  26. ^ HKSAR Electronic Passport (ePassport) and Electronic Document of Identity for Visa Purposes (e-Doc/I)[dead link]
  27. ^ China bars radical H.K. legislator from visiting earthquake victims Kyodo News 4 July 2008
  28. ^ 治安警察局:非本澳門居民之入境及出境[dead link]
  29. ^ "港澳居民網路申請入臺證". Nas.immigration.gov.tw. 1 April 2008. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  30. ^ a b "港澳居民網路申請入臺證". Retrieved 12 April 2010. 
  31. ^ http://www.gov.hk/en/residents/immigration/traveldoc/hksarpassport/visafreeaccess.htm.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  32. ^ 2014 Henley and Partners Visa Restriction Index
  33. ^ Information pursuant to Council Regulation (EC) No 539/2001 of 15 March 2001 listing the third countries whose nationals must be in possession of visas when crossing the external borders and those whose nationals are exempt from that requirement
  34. ^ http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-04-09/australia-locks-in-annual-leadership-talks-with-china/4619230
  35. ^ It is likely that the extension of the availability of SmartGates in Australia to Chinese e-passport holders will include those holding Hong Kong SAR and Macao SAR passports, since all these passports have the same country code (CHN) on the biodata page.
  36. ^ a b c "Visit Visa / Entry Permit Requirements for the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region". Immd.gov.hk. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  37. ^ "Visa Information for Nicaragua: Holders of Normal Passports from Hong Kong". Timatic. International Air Transport Association (IATA). 
  38. ^ "Visa-free Access for HKSAR Passports". GovHK. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  39. ^ "BN(O) visa free access". Ukinhongkong.fco.gov.uk. 1 February 2010. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  40. ^ UK Border Agency – Police registration[dead link]
  41. ^ UK Border Agency – List of countries or territories whose nationals of citizens require police registration[dead link]
  42. ^ "Australian Electronic Travel Authority: Frequently Asked Questions". Eta.immi.gov.au. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  43. ^ "Working Holiday Visa (Subclass 417)". Immi.gov.au. 29 October 2008. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  44. ^ "International Experience Canada". Canadainternational.gc.ca. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  45. ^ "Consulate General of France in Hong Kong and Macau: Working holiday". Retrieved 9 August 2013. 
  46. ^ "Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany in Hong Kong: Working Holiday Visa (WHV)" (PDF). Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  47. ^ "Working Holidays in Ireland". Dfa.ie. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  48. ^ "Consulate-General of Japan in Hong Kong:Working Holiday Scheme". Hk.emb-japan.go.jp. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  49. ^ "Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Working Holiday Scheme". Immigration.govt.nz. 25 May 2011. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  50. ^ "▒ Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Hong kong ▒". Hkg.mofat.go.kr. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  51. ^ "Guidance Notes on Working Holiday Scheme". Immd.gov.hk. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  52. ^ http://www.labour.gov.hk/eng/plan/guidance.htm
  53. ^ https://www.gov.uk/tier-5-youth-mobility/eligibility
  54. ^ "Constitutional and Administrative Law List No. 32 of 2007". Legalref.judiciary.gov.hk. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  55. ^ http://legalref.judiciary.gov.hk/lrs/common/search/search_result_detail_frame.jsp?DIS=61035&QS=%2B&TP=JU
  • Book in Chinese: 香港居民的國籍問題, Yung Cheung (張勇) and Yuk-Tin Chan (陳玉田)

External links[edit]