HMCS Ottawa (DDH 229)

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For other ships of the same name, see HMCS Ottawa.
Career (Canada)
Namesake: Ottawa River
Builder: Canadian Vickers, Montreal
Laid down: 8 June 1951
Launched: 29 April 1953
Commissioned: 10 November 1956
Decommissioned: 31 July 1992
Reclassified: 21 October 1964 (as DDH)
Fate: Scrapped in 1994.
General characteristics
Class & type: St. Laurent class destroyer
Displacement:

As DDE: 2263 tons (normal), 2800 tons (deep load)[1]

As DDH:

2260 tons (normal), 3051 tons (deep load)[2]
Length: 366 ft (111.6 m)
Beam: 42 ft (12.8 m)
Draught:

As DDE: 13 ft (4.0 m)[3]

As DDH:14 ft (4.3 m)[4]
Propulsion: 2-shaft English-Electric geared steam turbines, 3 Babcock and Wilcox boilers 30,000 shp (22,000 kW)
Speed: 28.5 knots (52.8 km/h)[5]
Range: 4,750 nautical miles (8,797.0 km) at 14 knots (25.9 km/h)[6]
Complement:

As DDE: 249

As DDH: 213 plus 20 aircrew
Sensors and
processing systems:

As DDE:

  • 1 × SPS-12 air search radar
  • 1 × SPS-10B surface search radar
  • 1 × Sperry Mk.2 navigation radar
  • 1 × SQS-10 or -11 hull mounted active search and attack sonar
  • 1 × SQS-501 (Type 162) high frequency bottom profiling sonar
  • 1 × SQS-502 (Type 170) high frequency Limbo mortar control sonar
  • 1 × UQC-1B "Gertrude" underwater telephone
  • 1 × GUNAR (Mk.64 GFCS with 2 on-mount SPG-48 directors)

As DDH:

  • 1 × SPS-12 air search radar
  • 1 × SPS-10B surface search radar
  • 1 × Sperry Mk.2 navigation radar
  • 1 × URN 20 TACAN radar
  • 1 × SQS-10 or -11 hull mounted active search and attack sonar
  • 1 × SQS-501 (Type 162) high frequency bottom profiling sonar
  • 1 × SQS-502 (Type 170) high frequency Limbo mortar control sonar
  • 1 × SQS-504 VDS, medium frequency active search (except 233 after 1986)
  • 1 × UQC-1B "Gertrude" underwater telephone
  • 1 × GUNAR (Mk.64 GFCS with 1 on-mount SPG-48 director)
Electronic warfare
& decoys:

As DDE:

  • 1 × DAU HF/DF (high frequency direction finder)

As DDH:

  • 1 × WLR 1C radar warning
  • 1 × UPD 501 radar detection
  • 1 × SRD 501 HF/DF
Armament:

As DDE:

  • 2 × 3"/50 Mk.33 FMC twin mounts guns
  • 2 × 40mm "Boffin" single mount guns
  • 2 × Mk NC 10 Limbo ASW mortars
  • 2 × single Mk.2 "K-gun" launchers with homing torpedoes

As DDH:

  • 1 × 3"/50 Mk.33 FMC twin mount gun
  • 1 × Mk NC 10 Limbo ASW mortar
  • 2 × triple Mk.32 12.75-inch (324 mm) launchers firing Mk.44 or Mk.46 Mod 5 torpedoes
Aircraft carried:

As DDE:

  • none

As DDH:

HMCS Ottawa (DDH 229) was a St. Laurent-class destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy and later the Canadian Forces from 1956-1992.

She was commissioned into the RCN on 10 November 1956 and initially carried the pennant number DDE 229 as a destroyer escort. She underwent conversion to a destroyer helicopter escort (DDH) in the early 1960s and was officially reclassed with pennant DDH 229 on 21 October 1964.

In 1968 she became the first bilingual ship of Maritime Command.

Ottawa was selected by the Canadian Forces for the Destroyer Life Extension (DELEX) program and completed this refit on 26 November 1982.

She was decommissioned from active service in the CF on 31 July 1992. Ottawa had steamed 834,634 nautical miles (1,545,742 km) over her lifetime, visiting over 350 ports in more than 40 countries throughout the world.

She was scrapped in 1994.

Ship's Bell[edit]

The Christening Bells Project at Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt Naval and Military Museum includes information from the ship's bell of HMCS Ottawa (3rd) 1956 - 1993, which was used for baptism of babies onboard ship 1956 - 1992. The bell is currently held by the CFB Esquimalt Naval & Military Museum, Esquimalt, BC.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ These were "officially revised figures" quoted in Janes Fighting Ships 1963-64
    Conways says 2000 tons standard displacement, 2600 deep load.
    Combat Fleets of the World 1978-79 says 2390 tons displacement, 2900 full load.
  2. ^ Janes Fighting Ships 1992-93, p84.
  3. ^ Janes Fighting Ships 1963-64
  4. ^ Janes Fighting Ships 1992-93, p84.
  5. ^ Janes Fighting Ships 1963-64
  6. ^ Combat Fleets of the World 1978-79
  7. ^ http://www.navalandmilitarymuseum.org/resource_pages/bells/bells.asp Christening bells