List of active United States Marine Corps aircraft squadrons

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This is a list of all of the active squadrons that exist in the United States Marine Corps, sorted by type. Most squadrons have changed names and designations many times over the years, so they are listed by their current designation.

To see Marine Aviation units sorted by command hierarchy, see aviation combat element.

Squadron designations[edit]

The basic tactical and administrative unit of United States Marine Corps aviation is the squadron. Fixed-wing aircraft squadrons (heavier than air) and tiltrotor squadrons are denoted by the letter "V", which comes from the Spanish verb "volar" (to fly). Rotary wing (helicopter) squadrons use "H." Marine squadrons are always noted by the second letter "M." Squadron numbering is not linear as some were numbered in ascending order and others took numbers from the wing or the ship to which they were assigned. From 1920 to 1941, Marine flying squadrons were identified by one digit numbers. This changed on July 1, 1941 when all existing squadrons were redesignated to a three-digit system. The first two numbers were supposed to identify the squadrons parent group but with the rapid expansion during World War II and frequent transfer of squadrons this system fell apart.[1]

Rotary-wing aircraft[edit]

Marine Helicopter Squadron[edit]

The squadron is responsible for the helicopter transportation of the President of the United States, Vice President, Cabinet members and VIPs. In addition to its VIP transport role, it is also tasked with operational test and evaluation (OT&E) of new flight systems for Marine Corps helicopters.[2] The squadron flies the VH-3D Sea King and the VH-60N Whitehawk. These were due to be replaced by the VH-71 Kestrel,[3] however that program was cancelled in April 2009.[4]

Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
HMX-1
Hmx1 official insigia.jpg
Nighthawks
1 December 1947
Headquarters Marine Corps
MCAF Quantico, VA[5]

Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadrons[edit]

Heavy helicopter squadrons were first formed in 1966 when the Marine Corps began flying the heavy lift CH-53 Sea Stallion during the Vietnam War.[6] Their primary role is moving cargo and equipment with the secondary role of transferring troops ashore in an amphibious assault. Most of the squadrons have transitioned to the larger and more powerful CH-53E Super Stallion; however, three squadrons of the original Sea Stallions still remain.[7] The CH-53Es are the most powerful helicopter in the U.S. military inventory today.[8] Due to a reorganization in Marine aviation, HMH-366 was reactivated in 2008[9] at MCAS Cherry Point.[10]

CH-53D Sea Stallion
CH-53E Super Stallion

The squadron trains newly designated (i.e., winged) Naval Aviators, conversion pilots, refresher pilots, and enlisted aircrew on the CH-53E Super Stallion.[17]

Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
HMH-361
HMH-361 insignia.png
Flying Tigers
25 February 19
MAG-16, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA[11]
HMH-362
Hmm362logo.gif
Ugly Angels
30 April 1952
MAG-24, 1st MAW
MCAS Kaneohe Bay, HI[12]
HMH-366
Hmh366.gif
Hammerheads
30 September 2008
MAG-29, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC
HMH-461
Hmh461newpatch.jpg
Iron Horse
15 March 1944
MAG-26, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC[13]
HMH-462
HMH-462 insignia.png
Heavy Haulers
15 April 1944
MAG-16, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA[14]
HMH-463
HMH-463 insignia.png
Pegasus
20 July 1944
MAG-24, 1st MAW
MCAS Kaneohe Bay, HI[15]
HMH-464
Hmh464-a.jpg
Condors
5 April 1944
MAG-29, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC[16]
HMH-465
HMH-465 insignia.png
Warhorse
1 December 1981
MAG-16, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA
HMH-466
HMH-466 insignia.png
Wolfpack
30 November 1984
MAG-16, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
HMHT-302
HMT-302.png
Phoenix
1 November 1966
MAG-29, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC

Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadrons[edit]

The Marine Corps’ light attack squadrons are composite squadrons usually made up of 18 AH-1W Cobras and 9 UH-1N Hueys. The primary missions of the Cobra is close air support, forward air control, reconnaissance and armed escort,[18] while the Huey provides airborne command and control, utility support, supporting arms coordination and medical evacuation.[19] Both airframes are due to be upgraded as part of the H-1 upgrade program which will see them get greater power, improved avionics and an 85% commonality of parts. When the aircraft are upgraded, they will have the new nomenclatures AH-1Z[20] and UH-1Y.[21][22] Due to the need for more light attack squadrons, the Marine Corps began adding new squadrons in 2008.[23] HMLA-467 and HMLA-469 activated recently.[10]

AH-1W Cobra
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
HMLA-167
Hmla167 insig.jpg
Warriors
1 April 1968
MAG-29, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC[24]
HMLA-169
HMLA-169 insignia.png
Vipers
30 September 1971
MAG-39, 3rd MAW
MCAS Camp Pendleton, CA[25]
HMLA-267
HMLA-267.png
Stingers
15 February 1944
MAG-39, 3rd MAW
MCAS Camp Pendleton, CA[26]
HMLA-269
Hmla-269.jpg
The Gunrunners
22 February 1971
MAG-29, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC[27]
HMLA-367
HMLA 367 insignia.png
Scarface
1 December 1943
MAG-24, 1st MAW
MCAS Kaneohe Bay, HI[28]
HMLA-369
HMLA-369 insignia.PNG
Gunfighters
1 April 1972
MAG-39, 3rd MAW
MCAS Camp Pendleton, CA[29]
HMLA-467
HMLA-467 insignia.png
Sabers
1 October 2008
MAG-29, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC[30]
HMLA-469
HMLA-469 Logo.jpg
Vengeance
30 June 2009
MAG-39, 3rd MAW
MCAS Camp Pendleton, CA[31]
HMLA-773
Hmla-773.gif
Red Dog
June 1968
MAG-49, 4th MAW
Robins AFB, GA[32]

Marine Light Attack Helicopter Training Squadron[edit]

The squadron trains newly designated (i.e., winged) Naval Aviators, conversion pilots, refresher pilots, and enlisted aircrew on the AH-1W SuperCobra, the UH-1N Twin Huey, as well as transition to the newer AH-1Z Viper and UH-1Y Venom variants.[33]

Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
HMLAT-303
HMT-303.png
Atlas
30 April 1982
MAG-39, 3rd MAW
MCAS Camp Pendleton, CA

Marine Medium Helicopter Squadrons[edit]

The Marine Corps' HMM squadrons first came to being in 1964 with the fielding of the CH-46 Sea Knight medium helicopter. They provide all-weather, day/night, night vision goggle (NVG) assault transport of combat troops, supplies, and equipment during amphibious and subsequent operations ashore. Troop assault is their primary function and the movement of supplies and equipment is secondary.[34][35] The CH-46 is currently being replaced by the MV-22B Osprey and HMM squadrons are incrementally being deactivated and coming back as VMMs.[36]

CH-46 Sea Knight
HMM-268 Phrog in a field outside of Baghdad on April 10, 2003
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
HMM-268
HMM-268 insignia.png
Red Dragons
September 15, 1972
MAG-16, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA[37]
HMM-364
HMM 364 LOGO.jpg
Purple Foxes
September 1, 1961
MAG-39, 3rd MAW
MCAS Camp Pendleton, CA[38]
HMM-774
HMM774WILDGOOSE.jpg
Wild Goose
1969
MAG-49, 4th MAW
NS Norfolk, VA[39]

Marine Medium Helicopter Training Squadron[edit]

The squadron trains newly designated (i.e., winged) Naval Aviators, conversion pilots, refresher pilots, and enlisted aircrew on the CH-46 Sea Knight.[40]

Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
HMMT-164
HMMT-164 Green.JPG
Knightriders
July 1, 1962
MAG-39, 3rd MAW
MCAS Camp Pendleton, CA

Tiltrotor Aircraft[edit]

Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadrons[edit]

Marine tiltrotor squadrons are new units operating the MV-22 Osprey with their main mission being assault support. The Osprey offers twice the speed, three times the payload, five times the range, and can fly more than twice as high as the helicopters it is replacing.[41] As the Marine Corps’ number one aviation acquisition priority, the Osprey is replacing the aging fleet of CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters and is a cornerstone of the capstone concept of Expeditionary maneuver warfare.[42] The Marine Corps is planning on transitioning two squadrons a year to the new airframe until all squadrons have made the conversion.[36][dead link]

USAF CV-22 Osprey
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMM-161
VMM-161 insignia.jpg
Greyhawks
15 January 1951
MAG-16, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA[43]
VMM-162
VMM-162.jpg
Golden Eagles
June 30, 1952
MAG-29, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC[44]
VMM-163
Hmm163-a.jpg
Ridge Runners
December 1951
MAG-16, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA[45]
VMM-165
HMM-165 insignia.png
White Knights
July 1, 1965
MAG-16, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA[46]
VMM-166
Official VMM-166 Patch.JPG
Sea Elk
September 13, 1985
MAG-16, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA[47]
VMM-261
Vmm-261 squadron insignia.jpg
Raging Bulls
April 5, 1951
MAG-26, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC[48]
VMM-262
HMM-262.gif
Flying Tigers
September 1951
MAG-36, 1st MAW
MCAS Futenma, Japan[49]
VMM-263
VMM263.jpg
Thunder Eagles
June 16, 1952
MAG-29, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC[50]
VMM-264
Vmm-264insignia.jpg
Black Knights
June 30, 1959
MAG-26, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC[51]
VMM-265
VMM 265 Reinforced patches.jpg
Dragons
October 1, 1962
MAG-36, 1st MAW
MCAS Futenma, Japan[52]
VMM-266
Hmm266-a.jpg
Fighting Griffins
April 26, 1983
MAG-26, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC[53]
VMM-363
HMH-363 insignia.jpg
Red Lions
June 2, 1952
MAG-16, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA[54]
VMM-365
Vmm-365 squadron insignia.jpg
Blue Knights
July 1, 1963
MAG-26, 2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC[55]
VMM-764
Hmm764logo.gif
Moonlight
April 15, 1958
MAG-41, 4th MAW
Edwards AFB, CA[56]

Marine Tiltrotor Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron[edit]

The squadron is a joint Marine Corps and Air Force test and development unit. Its mission is to conduct operational testing and evaluation of the MV/CV-22 Osprey and future tiltrotor systems.[57][58]

Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMX-22
VMX-22.JPG
Argonauts
August 28, 2003
Operational Test and Evaluation Force
MCAS New River, NC

Marine Medium Tiltrotor Training Squadron[edit]

The squadron provides new and conversion training to both Marine and Air Force pilots and units in the use and maintenance of the Osprey tiltrotor aircraft that is scheduled to replace the Marine Corps' fleet of CH-46 Sea Knights.[59]

Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMMT-204
VMMT-204.jpg
Raptors
May 1, 1972
2nd MAW
MCAS New River, NC

Fixed-Wing Aircraft[edit]

Marine Attack Squadrons[edit]

After World War II, the United States Navy decided to combine all of the functions of the scout bomber, torpedo bomber and bomber torpedo communities into the Attack designation.[60] On July 22, 1946, it released Bulletin No. 46-1543, which authorized the formation of attack squadrons; however, the Marine Corps did not form any until 1952.[1] Today, Marine attack squadrons fly the AV-8B Harrier II[61] and are tasked with providing close air support, air interdiction, surveillance and escort of helicopters. Because the STOVL Harrier can operate from amphibious assault ships, expeditionary airfields and tactical remote landing sites, it provides commanders with more flexibility in providing air support.[62] The Harrier is due to be replaced by the F-35B, the STOVL version of the F-35 Lightning II.[63]

AV-8B Harrier II taking off
AV-8B Harrier II landing
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMA-211
Vma211 insig.jpg
Wake Island Avengers
1 January 1937
MAG-13, 3rd MAW
MCAS Yuma, AZ[64]
VMA-214
VMA214-Blacksheep.svg
Black Sheep
1 July 1942
MAG-13, 3rd MAW
MCAS Yuma, AZ[65]
VMA-223
Vma223a insig.jpg
Bulldogs
1 May 1942
MAG-14, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC[66]
VMA-231
Vma231-logo.gif
Ace of Spades
8 February 1919
MAG-14, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC[67]
VMA-311
Vma311-a.jpg
Tomcats
1 December 1942
MAG-13, 3rd MAW
MCAS Yuma, AZ
15 February 1944
VMA-542
Vma542.jpg
Tigers
6 March 1944
MAG-14, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC[68]

Marine Attack Training Squadron[edit]

TAV-8B

The squadron trains newly designated (i.e., winged) Naval Aviators to fly the AV-8B Harrier II.[69]

Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMAT-203
Vmat203.jpg
Hawks
July 1, 1947
MAG-14, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC

Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadrons[edit]

VMAQ squadrons operate the EA-6B Prowler[70] and are tasked with providing electronic attack, electronic counter-countermeasures, radar jamming and suppression of enemy air defense using the AN/ALQ-99 jamming pod[71] and the AGM-88 HARM. Each of the four squadrons operates five aircraft and are land-based, although they are capable of landing on board U.S. Navy aircraft carriers.[72][73] The Marine Corps has recently solidified plans to install a next-generation jammer on the F-35 Lightning II. It has joined the EA-18G Growler as the launch platform for the jammer, which is scheduled to enter service in 2018.[74]

EA-6B Prowler
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMAQ-1
VMAQ-1 patch.png
Banshees
July 1, 1992
MAG-14, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC
[75]
VMAQ-2
MCS149.jpg
Death Jesters
September 15, 1952
MAG-14, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC
[76]
VMAQ-3
VMAQ-3 insignia.jpg
Moon Dogs
July 1, 1992
MAG-14, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC
[77]
VMAQ-4
VMAQ4.jpg
Seahawks
November 7, 1981
MAG-14, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC
[78]

Marine Fighter Attack Squadrons[edit]

The Marine Corps' VMFA squadrons fly the single seat F/A-18A++, F/A-18C Hornet and F-35B Lightning II. Their primary role is to intercept and destroy enemy aircraft and to attack and destroy surface targets in all weather conditions. Each Hornet squadron operates 12 aircraft, while each F-35B squadron operates 16 aircraft.[79][80]

F/A-18C Hornet
F/A-18 Hornet in transonic flight
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMFA-112
VMFA-112 squadron insignia.jpg
Cowboys
March 1, 1942
MAG-41, 4th MAW
NASJRB Fort Worth, TX
[81]
VMFA-115
VMFA-115 insignia.jpg
Silver Eagles
July 1, 1943
MAG-31, 2nd MAW
MCAS Beaufort, SC
[82]
VMFA-121
VMFA(AW)-121 insignia.png
Green Knights
June 24, 1941
MAG-11, 3rd MAW
MCAS Yuma, AZ
[83]
VMFA-122
VMFA-122 insignia werewolve.png
Werewolves
March 1, 1942
MAG-31, 2nd MAW
MCAS Beaufort, SC
[84]
VMFA-232
VMFA-232 patch.svg
Red Devils
September 1, 1925
MAG-11, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA
[85]
VMFA-251
VMFA-251.png
Thunderbolts
December 1, 1941
MAG-31, 2nd MAW
MCAS Beaufort, SC
[86]
VMFA-312
VMFA-312.png
Checkerboard
June 1, 1943
MAG-31, 2nd MAW
MCAS Beaufort, SC
[87]
VMFA-314
VMFA-314patch.png
Black Knights
October 1, 1943
MAG-11, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA
[88]
VMFA-323
VMFA-323 insignia.png
Death Rattlers
August 1, 1943
MAG-11, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA
[89]

Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadrons[edit]

The VMFA(AW) squadrons fly the two seat F/A-18D Hornet. Their primary mission is to attack and destroy surface targets, day or night, under all weather conditions; conduct multi-sensor imagery reconnaissance; provide supporting arms coordination; and intercept and destroy enemy aircraft in all weather conditions. The current F/A-18s saw their first action in Operation Desert Storm after replacing the venerable F-4 Phantom II.[79][80]

F/A-18D dropping bombs
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMFA(AW)-224
VMFA-224 insignia.jpg
Bengals
May 1, 1942
MAG-31, 2nd MAW
MCAS Beaufort, SC
[90]
VMFA(AW)-225
VMFA (AW) 225 insignia.png
Vikings
January 1, 1943
MAG-11, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA
[91]
VMFA(AW)-242
VMFA AW 242 insignia.png
Bats
July 1, 1943
MAG-12, 1st MAW
MCAS Iwakuni, JA
[92]
VMFA(AW)-533
VMFA-533.png
Hawks
October 1, 1943
MAG-31, 2nd MAW
MCAS Beaufort, SC
[93]

Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadrons[edit]

VMFAT-101 trains newly designated (i.e., winged) Naval Aviators to fly the F/A-18 Hornet while VMFAT-501 trains new and transitioning pilots to fly the F-35B Lightning II.[94][95]

Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMFAT-101
VMFAT-101 insignia.png
Sharpshooters
January 3, 1969
MAG-11, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA
VMFAT-501
VMFAT-501.png
Warlords
April 1, 2010
MAG-31, 2nd MAW
Eglin AFB, FL

Marine Fighter Training Squadron[edit]

VMFT-401 is the only aggressor squadron in the Marine Corps. It flies the F-5E Tiger II and provides instruction to active and reserve squadrons through dissimilar adversary combat tactics. The squadron is based at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona.[96]

F-5E Tiger II
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMFT-401
VMFT-401.gif
Snipers
March 18, 1986
MAG-41, 4th MAW
MCAS Yuma, AZ

Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadrons[edit]

VMGR squadrons operate the KC-130 Hercules tanker/transport. Their primary missions are aerial and rapid ground refuelling, transportation of personnel and cargo to include MEDEVACs and parachute insertions, flying the airborne version of the Direct Air Support Center (DASC) and emergency resupply into unimproved landing zones.[97][98][99]

KC-130J Hercules of VMGR-252
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMGR-152
VMGR-152patchscan.jpg
Sumos
11 March 1942
MAG-36, 1st MAW
MCAS Futenma, Japan
[100]
VMGR-234
VMGR-234.png
Rangers
1 May 1942
MAG-41, 4th MAW
NASJRB Fort Worth, TX
[101]
VMGR-252
Vmgr252 insig.jpg
Otis
1 June 1928
MAG-14, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC
[102]
VMGR-352
VMGR-352 squadron insignia.png
Raiders
1 April 1943
MAG-11, 3rd MAW
MCAS Miramar, CA
[103]
VMGR-452
Vmgr452 insig.jpg
Yankees
9 September 1988
MAG-49, 4th MAW
Stewart ANGB, NY
[104]

Marine Transport Squadron[edit]

VMR squadrons provide search and rescue support as well as movement of key personnel and critical logistics support around the world. They also provide movement of high priority passengers and cargo during wartime in support of operations and other critical commitments.[105]

UC-35D
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMR-1
VMR-1Insignia.gif
Roadrunners
January 1943
H&HS, MCAS Cherry Point
MCAS Cherry Point, NC

Unmanned Aerial Systems[edit]

Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadrons[edit]

VMUs operate the RQ-7B Shadow unmanned aerial system (UAS) which provides Marine ground forces with reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition. They also provide artillery spotting and can assist in search and rescue operations.[106][107] Since 2004, the VMU squadrons have also been operating the Boeing ScanEagle UAS, and has longer endurance and smaller footprint, but has a lesser camera capability with no IR pointer.[108] The Navy/Marine Corps has shown interest in the MQ-8B Fire Scout Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV),[109] which was originally developed to meet the future Tier III requirements of the Marine Corps.[110] Due to the high operational tempo of the VMU squadrons in recent years, the Marine Corps stood up VMU-3 in 2008 and VMU-4, a reserve unit, was activated in 2010 with the lineage of VMO-4.[23]

RQ-7 Shadow
Squadron Name Insignia Nickname Date Commissioned Senior Command Station
VMU-1
VMU-1 squadron insignia.png
Watchdogs
21 January 1987
MACG-38, 3rd MAW
MCAGCC Twentynine Palms, CA
[111]
VMU-2
VMU-2 new insignia.gif
Night Owls
June 1984
MACG-28, 2nd MAW
MCAS Cherry Point, NC
[112]
VMU-3
VMU-3 logo.png
Phantoms
12 September 2008
MACG-38, 3rd MAW
MCAGCC Twentynine Palms, CA
VMU-4
Evil Eyes
20 December 1943
MACG-48, 4th MAW
MCB Camp Pendleton, CA

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rottman, Gordon L. (2002). U.S. Marine Corps World War II Order of Battle – Ground and Air Units in the Pacific War. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. ISBN 0313319065. 
  2. ^ "Marine Helicopter Squadron One". The White House. United States Government. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  3. ^ "History of the Executive Flight Detachment". Marine Helicopter Squadron One. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2009-10-26. [dead link]
  4. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30071664/
  5. ^ "Marine Helicopter Squadron One". United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2009-10-26. 
  6. ^ Weiss, Alan. "Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion". The Flying Tigers of HMR, HMM, HMH 361. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  7. ^ "CH-53A/D/E Sea Stallion and MH-53E Sea Dragon". Naval Historical Center. United States Navy. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  8. ^ "CH-53E / S-80E Super Stallion Helicopter". Sikorsky. Archived from the original on October 16, 2006. Retrieved 2007-03-26. 
  9. ^ Wilson, Drew C (30 August 2008). "New squadron takes flight at Cherry Point". Havelock News (Freedom Communications, Inc). Retrieved 2008-08-30. 
  10. ^ a b Barton, Mike (10 July 2008). "Helicopters bring new training to MCAS Cherry Point". Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point (United States Marine Corps). Archived from the original on July 14, 2008. Retrieved 2008-07-13. 
  11. ^ "Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 361". Marine Aircraft Group 16. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  12. ^ "Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 362". Marine Aircraft Group 24. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  13. ^ "Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 461". Marine Aircraft Group 29. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  14. ^ "Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 462". Marine Aircraft Group 16. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  15. ^ "Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 463". Marine Aircraft Group 24. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  16. ^ "Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 464". Marine Aircraft Group 29. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  17. ^ "Marine Helicopter Training Squadron 302". Marine Aircraft Group 29. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  18. ^ "UH-1 Huey Helicopter". Military Analysis Network. Federation of American Scientists. 1999-03-12. Retrieved 2007-03-27. 
  19. ^ "AH-1W Super Cobra AND UH-1N Huey". Naval Historical Center. United States Navy. Retrieved 2007-03-26. 
  20. ^ "The Bell AH-1Z". Bell Helicopter. Retrieved 2007-03-26. 
  21. ^ "The Bell UH-1Y". Bell Helicopter. Retrieved 2007-03-26. 
  22. ^ United States Marine Corps – 2005 – Concepts + Programs (PDF). Headquarters Marine Corps. 2005. Archived from the original on January 1, 2007. Retrieved 2007-02-28. 
  23. ^ a b LtGen George J. Trautman, III (2009). 2010 Marine Aviation Plan (PDF). Headquarters Marine Corps. Retrieved 2010-01-05. [dead link]
  24. ^ "Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 167". Marine Aircraft Group 26. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  25. ^ "Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 169". Marine Aircraft Group 39. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  26. ^ "Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 267". Marine Aircraft Group 39. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  27. ^ "Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 269". Marine Aircraft Group 29. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  28. ^ "Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 367". Marine Aircraft Group 39. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  29. ^ "Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369". Marine Aircraft Group 39. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  30. ^ "Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 467". Marine Aircraft Group 29. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2008-10-04. 
  31. ^ "Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 469". Marine Aircraft Group 39. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2009-05-18. 
  32. ^ "Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 773". Marine Aircraft Group 42. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2010-08-09. 
  33. ^ "Marine Light Attack Helicopter Training Squadron 303". Marine Aircraft Group 39. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved 2007-03-16. 
  34. ^ [dead link] "CH-46 and UH-46 Sea Knight". Naval Historical Center. United States Navy. Retrieved 2007-03-26. 
  35. ^ "CH-46E Sea Knight". Boeing. Retrieved 2007-03-26. 
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