HMS Abelia (K184)

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HMS Abelia IWM A 7312.jpg
At Hvalfjord, Iceland after a patrol in the North Atlantic in search of the German battleship Tirpitz, January 1942
Career (UK) RN Ensign
Name: HMS Abelia
Builder: Harland and Wolff,[1] Belfast
Yard number: 1095[1]
Launched: 28 November 1940
Completed: 3 February 1941[1]
Decommissioned: 1946
Identification: Pennant number: K184
Fate: Sold as merchant ship 1947. Scrapped 1966.
General characteristics
Class & type: Flower-class corvette
Displacement: 925 long tons
Length: 205 ft (62 m) o/a
Beam: 33 ft (10 m)
Draught: 11 ft 6 in (3.51 m)
Propulsion: 1 × 4-cycle triple-expansion reciprocating steam engine
2 × fire tube Scotch boilers
Single shaft
2,750 ihp (2,050 kW)
Speed: 16 kn (30 km/h)
Range: 3,500 nmi (6,500 km) at 12 kn (22 km/h)
Complement: 85
Sensors and
processing systems:
1 × SW1C or 2C radar
1 × Type 123A or Type 127DV sonar
Armament: 1 × BL 4-inch (101.6 mm) Mk.IX gun

2 × Vickers .50 cal machine gun (twin)
2 × Lewis .303 cal machine gun (twin)
2 × Mk.II Depth charge throwers

2 × Depth charge rails with 40 depth charges
Service record
Commanders: Orme G. Stuart (1943–1944)
Operations: Battle of the Atlantic

HMS Abelia was a Flower-class corvette that served in the Royal Navy and was built by Harland and Wolff in 1941.[1]

She was launched on 28 November 1940, and was fitted for minesweeping. She served in World War II; her commanding officer for parts of 1943 and 1944 was Lieutenant Orme G. Stuart.

On 9 January 1944 Abelia encountered a U-Boat while on convoy escort duty, and moved to attack with depth charges. Lieutenant Stuart ordered an increase in speed at 950 yards to prevent being torpedoed, not knowing that the U-boat was equipped with T5 torpedoes, for which he would have needed to increase speed at 700 yards. Abelia was hit and lost her rudder, and the U-boat escaped.

She was sold in 1947 and became the merchant vessel Kraft in 1948. She was renamed Arne Skontorp in 1954. She was eventually scrapped in December 1966.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d McCluskie, Tom (2013). The Rise and Fall of Harland and Wolff. Stroud: The History Press. p. 149. ISBN 9780752488615. 

External links[edit]