HMS Caesar (1793)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other ships of the same name, see HMS Caesar.
HMS Caesar (1793) engaging Mont Blanc.jpg
HMS Caesar engaging Mont Blanc at the Battle of Cape Ortegal, 4 November 1805
Career (UK) Royal Navy Ensign
Name: HMS Caesar
Ordered: November 1783
Builder: Plymouth Dockyard
Laid down: 24 January 1786
Launched: 16 November 1793
Honours and
awards:

Participated in:

Fate: Broken up, 1821
General characteristics [1]
Class & type: 80-gun third rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 1992 tons (2024 tonnes)
Length: 181 ft (55 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 51 ft 3 in (15.62 m)
Depth of hold: 22 ft 4 in (6.81 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 80 guns:
  • Gundeck: 30 × 32 pdrs
  • Upper gundeck: 32 × 24 pdrs
  • Quarterdeck: 14 × 9 pdrs
  • Forecastle: 4 × 9 pdrs

HMS Caesar, also Cæsar, was an 80-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 16 November 1793 at Plymouth. She was designed by Sir Edward Hunt, and was the only ship built to her draught.[1] She was also one of only two British-built 80-gun ships of the period, the other being HMS Foudroyant (1798).

Service[edit]

Battle of Algeciras Bay[edit]

She was involved in the Battle of Algeciras Bay in 1801, during which her Master, William Grave, was killed[2] and buried in Trafalgar Cemetery in Gibraltar.

Gravestone in Trafalgar Cemetery Gibraltar.jpg

Battle of Cape Ortegal[edit]

The Battle of Cape Ortegal was the final action of the Trafalgar Campaign, and was fought between a squadron of the Royal Navy and a remnant of the fleet that had been destroyed several weeks earlier at the Battle of Trafalgar. It took place on 4 November 1805 off Cape Ortegal, in north-west Spain and saw a squadron under Captain Sir Richard Strachan in Caesar defeat and capture a French squadron under Rear-Admiral Pierre Dumanoir le Pelley.

Battle of Les Sables-d'Olonne[edit]

In 1809, she took part in the Battle of Les Sables-d'Olonne.

Fate[edit]

She was converted to serve as a depot ship in 1814, and was broken up in 1821.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Lavery, Ships of the Line, vol. 1, p. 183.
  2. ^ McCarthy, The Road to McCarthy. p.10

References[edit]

  • Lavery, Brian (2003) The Ship of the Line - Volume 1: The development of the battlefleet 1650-1850. Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-252-8.
  • McCarthy, Pete (2003) The Road to McCarthy Sceptre. ISBN 0-340-76607-7.