HMS D5

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Career RN Ensign
Name: HMS D5
Builder: Vickers Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness
Laid down: 23 February 1910
Launched: 28 August 1911
Commissioned: 19 February 1911
Fate: Sunk, 3 November 1914
General characteristics
Class & type: D class submarine
Displacement: 483 long tons (491 t) (surfaced)
595 long tons (605 t) (submerged)
Length: 163 ft (50 m) (o/a)
Beam: 13.6 ft (4.1 m) (o/a)
Installed power: 1,750 hp (1,300 kW) (diesel engines)
550 hp (410 kW) (electric motors)
Propulsion: 2 × diesel engines
2 × electric motors
2 × screws
Speed:
  • Surfaced: 14 kn (16 mph; 26 km/h)
  • Submerged: 10 kn (12 mph; 19 km/h) (design); 9 kn (10 mph; 17 km/h) (service)
Range: 2,500 nmi (2,900 mi; 4,600 km) at 10 kn (12 mph; 19 km/h)
45 nmi (52 mi; 83 km) at 5 kn (5.8 mph; 9.3 km/h)
Complement: 25
Armament: 3 × 18 in (460 mm) torpedo tubes (2 forward, one aft; 6 torpedoes),[1] 1 × 12 pdr (5.4 kg) deck gun[2]

HMS D5 was a British D class submarine built by Vickers, Barrow. D5 was laid down on 23 February 1910, launched on 28 August 1911 and was commissioned on 19 February 1911.

Sinking[edit]

D5 met her fate 2 mi (3.2 km) south of South Cross Buoy off Great Yarmouth in the North Sea. She was sunk by a German mine laid by SMS Stralsund on 3 November 1914 after responding to a German attack on Yarmouth by cruisers. There were only five survivors, including her commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander Godfrey Herbert.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fitzsimons, Bernard. Illustrated Encyclopedia of 20th Century Weapons and Warfare (London: Phoebus, 1978), Volume 7, p.674, "D.1".
  2. ^ Fitzsimons, p.674.

External links[edit]