HMS Defiance (1675)

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For other ships of the same name, see HMS Defiance.
Career (Great Britain) Royal Navy Ensign
Name: HMS Defiance
Builder: Phineas Pett II, Chatham Dockyard
Launched: 1675
Fate: Broken up, 1749
General characteristics as built[1]
Class & type: 64-gun third rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 890 tons (904.3 tonnes)
Length: 117 ft (36 m) (keel)
Beam: 37 ft 10 in (11.53 m)
Depth of hold: 15 ft 10 in (4.83 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 64 guns of various weights of shot
General characteristics after 1695 rebuild[2]
Class & type: 64-gun third rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 902 tons (916.5 tonnes)
Length: 143 ft 10 in (43.84 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 37 ft 11 in (11.56 m)
Depth of hold: 15 ft 8 in (4.78 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 64 guns of various weights of shot
General characteristics after 1707 rebuild[3]
Class & type: 66-gun third rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 949 tons (964.2 tonnes)
Length: 146 ft 3 12 in (44.6 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 38 ft 6 in (11.73 m)
Depth of hold: 15 ft 9 12 in (4.8 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 66 guns of various weights of shot

HMS Defiance was a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built by Phineas Pett II at Chatham Dockyard, and launched in 1675.[1]

In the summer of 1678, Defiance was under the command of John Ernle.[4][5]

She was rebuilt at Woolwich Dockyard in 1695, again as a 64-gun ship.[2]

Defiance was part of a squadron under Vice-Admiral John Benbow in August 1702. In an action between Benbow's squadron and the squadron of the French Admiral Jean du Casse, Defiance under Captain Richard Kirkby was one of the ships that refused to engage. Along with Windsor, Defiance bore away from the French squadron after only two or three broadsides, and stood out of range. At his court-martial, Captain Kirkby was convicted of cowardice and sentenced to be shot.[6]

In 1707 she was rebuilt for a second time, relaunching from Deptford Dockyard as a 66-gun third rate.[3]

Defiance was reduced to a fourth rate in 1716.

On 30 August 1739 command of her was given to Captain John Trevor.[7]

She was hulked in 1743 and was broken up in 1749.[3][8]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p161.
  2. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p165.
  3. ^ a b c Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p167.
  4. ^ Thomas Baker, Piracy and diplomacy in seventeenth-century North Africa: the journal of Thomas Baker, ed. C. R. Pennell (1989), pp. 84, 94, 99
  5. ^ Henry Teonge, The Diary of Henry Teonge: Chaplain on Board HM's Ships Assistance, Bristol and Royal Oak 1675-1679 (1927 edition) p. 252
  6. ^ Ships of the Old Navy, Breda (1692)
  7. ^ 'Office of the Lord High Admiral to Captain John Trevor', 30 August 1739, ADM 7/781, The National Archives at Kew
  8. ^ Ships of the Old Navy, Defiance (1675)

References[edit]

  • Lavery, Brian (2003) The Ship of the Line - Volume 1: The development of the battlefleet 1650-1850. Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-252-8.
  • Michael Phillips. Breda (70) (1692). Michael Phillips' Ships of the Old Navy. Retrieved 9 December 2007.
  • Michael Phillips. Defiance (64) (1675). Michael Phillips' Ships of the Old Navy. Retrieved 9 December 2007.
  • 'Office of the Lord High Admiral to Captain John Trevor', 30 August 1739, ADM 7/781, The National Archives at Kew