HMS Kangaroo (1900)

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Career (United Kingdom)
Name: HMS Kangaroo
Builder: Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company
Laid down: 29 December 1899
Launched: 8 September 1900
Fate: Sold for scrap, 23 February 1920
General characteristics [1]
Class & type: B-class destroyer
Displacement: 390 long tons (400 t) normal,
420 long tons (430 t) deep load
Length: 219 ft 9 in (66.98 m) oa,
215 ft 0 in (65.53 m) pp
Beam: 20 ft 9 in (6.32 m)
Draught: 8 ft 11 in (2.72 m)
Propulsion: 4 Reed boilers,[2]
Vertical triple-expansion steam engines, 2 shafts,[2]
6,200 ihp (4,600 kW)
Speed: 30 kn (56 km/h; 35 mph)
Range: 1,635 nmi (3,028 km; 1,882 mi) at 11 kn (20 km/h; 13 mph)
Complement: 63[3]
Armament: 1 × QF 12-pounder gun
5 × 6-pounder guns
2 × 18 in (460 mm) torpedo tubes

HMS Kangaroo was a B-class torpedo boat destroyer of the British Royal Navy.[a] She served with the Dover Patrol in the First World War.

Construction and design[edit]

Kangaroo was laid down by Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company at Jarrow-on-Tyne as Yard Number 787 on 29 December 1899 with work starting on speculation (i.e. without a specific order), but was purchased for the Royal Navy as part of the 1900–1901 shipbuilding programme. She was launched on 8 September 1900 and completed in July 1901.[6]

Kangaroo was of similar design to HMS Peterel, Myrmidon and Syren, three "Thirty-Knotter" destroyers built by Palmers under the 1899–1900 programme. Like these ships, she was powered by triple-expansion steam engines fed by four Reed boilers and driving two propeller shafts. Four funnels were fitted, with the two middle funnels very closely spaced. The machinery was rated at 6,200 indicated horsepower (4,600 kW), sufficient to propel the ship at her contract speed of 30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph).[7]

Gun armament consisted of a single QF 12 pounder 12 cwt (3 in (76 mm) calibre) gun forward on a platform on the ship's conning tower together with five 6-pounder guns. Two 18-inch (450 mm) torpedo tubes completed the ship's armament.[8][9]

Service[edit]

Kangaroo was commissioned in August 1901 for service on the Mediterranean Station,[10] returning to the United Kingdom in 1905.[6] Apart from this tour in the Mediterranean, Kangaroo spent most of her duty time in home waters.[11] She was part of the Fourth Destroyer Flotilla at Portsmouth between 1910 and 1912, and then joined the Sixth Destroyer Flotilla.[12]

Kangaroo remained part of the Sixth Destroyer Flotilla, based at Dover for the duration of the First World War.[13][14]

HMS Kangaroo was finally sold for scrap to M. Yates on 23 February 1920, but was resold to Thomas W. Ward and broken up at Milford Haven.[14]

Pennant numbers[edit]

Pennant number[14] From To
P02 6 Dec 1914 1 Sep 1915
D82 1 Sep 1915 1 Jan 1918
D48 1 Jan 1918 -

References[edit]

  1. ^ On 30 August 1912 the Admiralty directed all destroyers were to be grouped into classes designated by letters based on contract speed and appearance. As a four-funneled 30-knotter destroyer, Wolf was assigned to the B Class.[4][5]
  1. ^ Friedman 2009, p. 251.
  2. ^ a b Lyon 2001, p. 78.
  3. ^ Manning 1961, p. 45.
  4. ^ Gardiner and Gray 1985, p. 18.
  5. ^ Manning 1961, pp. 17–18.
  6. ^ a b Lyon 2001, p. 81.
  7. ^ Lyon 2001, pp. 78, 80–81.
  8. ^ Lyon 2001, pp. 98–99.
  9. ^ Friedman 2009, p. 40.
  10. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence" The Times (London). Monday, 5 August 1901. (36525), p. 8.
  11. ^ "Purchased Destroyers". www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk. Retrieved 5 November 2012. 
  12. ^ "NMM, vessel ID 369436". Warship Histories, vol ii. National Maritime Museum. Retrieved 19 December 2013. 
  13. ^ Bacon 1918, p. 626.
  14. ^ a b c Dittmar and Colledge 1972, p. 57.
  • Bacon, Reginald (1918). The Dover Patrol 1915–1917. Volume II. London: Hutchinson & Son. 
  • Dittmar, F.J.; Colledge, J.J. (1972). British Warships 1914–1919. Shepperton, UK: Ian Allen. ISBN 0-7110-0380-7. 
  • Friedman, Norman (2009). British Destroyers: From Earliest Days to the Second World War. Barnsley, UK: Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84832-049-9. 
  • Lyon, David (2001). The First Destroyers. London: Caxton Editions. ISBN 1-84067-3648. 
  • Manning, T. D. (1961). The British Destroyer. London: Putnam & Co. Ltd.