HMS Kingston (1697)

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For other ships of the same name, see HMS Kingston.
Career (Great Britain) Royal Navy Ensign
Name: HMS Kingston
Builder: Frame, Hull
Laid down: 1665
Launched: 13 March 1697
Out of service: Sold, 14 January 1762
Renamed: Lord Clive, 1762
Honours and
awards:

Participated in:

Fate: Destroyed, 6 January 1763 whilst serving as the privateer Lord Clive
General characteristics as built[1]
Class & type: 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 923 bm
Length: 145 ft (44.2 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 37 ft 11 in (11.6 m)
Depth of hold: 15 ft 9 in (4.8 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 60 guns of various weights of shot
General characteristics after 1719 rebuild[2]
Class & type: 1706 Establishment 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 918 bm
Length: 144 ft (43.9 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 38 ft (11.6 m)
Depth of hold: 15 ft 8 in (4.8 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 60 guns:
  • Gundeck: 24 × 24 pdrs
  • Upper gundeck: 26 × 9 pdrs
  • Quarterdeck: 8 × 6 pdrs
  • Forecastle: 2 × 6 pdrs
General characteristics after 1740 rebuild[3]
Class & type: 1733 proposals 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 1,068
Length: 144 ft (43.9 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 41 ft 5 in (12.6 m)
Depth of hold: 16 ft 11 in (5.2 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament: 60 guns:
  • Gundeck: 24 × 24 pdrs
  • Upper gundeck: 26 × 9 pdrs
  • Quarterdeck: 8 × 6 pdrs
  • Forecastle: 2 × 6 pdrs

HMS Kingston was a 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built by Frame in Hull and launched on 13 March 1697.[1] She had an eventful career, taking part in numerous engagements.

Career[edit]

During the War of Spanish Succession, Kingston took part in the engagements of Gibraltar (1704) under the command of Edward Acton, Vélez Málaga (1709) and Gaspé (1711).

She was rebuilt for the first time according to the 1706 Establishment at Portsmouth Dockyard, and relaunched on 9 May 1719.[2] She was rebuilt for a second time at Plymouth according to the 1733 proposals of the 1719 Establishment, and relaunched on 8 October 1740.[3] Kingston was present at the Battle of Toulon in 1744.

During the Seven Years' War, the ship was part of Admiral John Byng's squadron sent to relieve Fort St. Philip (Port Mahon) in 1756, besieged by a French amphibious force who had invaded the island of Minorca. The squadron set sail from England on 10 April. On 2 May, it arrived at Gibraltar, departing on 8 May. On 19 May, it came into sight of Fort St. Philip. The French fleet then advanced to meet Byng. On 20 May, the squadron fought the Battle of Minorca where several British ships were seriously damaged but none was lost on either side. On 24 May, after a council of war, Byng gave orders to return to Gibraltar, abandoning Minorca to its fate. The squadron arrived at Gibraltar on 19 June.

In 1757, the ship was part of Admiral Holbourne's squadron which left Ireland on 5 May for the planned expedition against Louisbourg. By 10 July, the entire squadron was finally at anchor before Halifax where it made its junction with Hardy's squadron. However in August, when the combined fleet was ready to set sail, Louisbourg had already been reinforced by three French squadrons and Governor Loudon cancelled the whole enterprise. Holbourne's squadron stayed off Louisbourg until 25 September when it was dispersed by a storm, forcing it to return to Great Britain in a very bad condition. On 20 November 1759, Kingston took part in the Battle of Quiberon Bay where the French navy suffered a great defeat.

As the Lord Clive[edit]

The ship was sold to privateers linked to the East India Company on 14 January 1762 and renamed Lord Clive.

The same year during the Spanish-Portuguese War, 1761-1763, these privateers, fighting on the side of Portugal, had plans to conquer Spanish territory in South America and organised a raid on Buenos Aires and Montevideo.
Their squadron, under the command of Robert McNamara from the East India Company, consisted of the Lord Clive (60), the Ambuscade (40), two Portuguese ships (among which were the frigate Gloria (38)) transporting 500 foot soldiers, and five storeships. On 2 November, the squadron sailed from Rio de Janeiro towards the mouth of the Río de la Plata but soon abandoned the project because Spanish defenders on both cities were fully alerted and well prepared.

On January 6, 1763, McNamara decided to attack and retake Colonia do Sacramento also in Spanish hands. 60-gun Lord Clive and the 40-gun HMS Ambuscade along with 38-gun Portuguese Gloria anchored near the city and started bombardment, but they received unexpected strong resistance from the city gun battery. After three hours of fire exchange, a fire declared on the Lord Clive, it quickly extended and ship's santabarbara blew up, it sunk immediately . There were 272 fatalities on board, including the expedition's commander Captain Robert McNamara. HMS Ambuscade and Gloria were badly damaged too, and retired from combat.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p163.
  2. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p168.
  3. ^ a b Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p171.

References[edit]