HMS Lowestoft (1913)

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For other ships of the same name, see HMS Lowestoft.
HMS Lowestoft (1913).jpg
Career Royal Navy Ensign
Class and type: Town-class light cruiser
Name: HMS Lowestoft
Ordered: under 1911 Naval Estimates
Builder: Chatham Dockyard
Laid down: 29 July 1912
Launched: 23 April 1913
Commissioned: April 1914
Fate: Sold 8 January 1931 for scrapping
General characteristics
Displacement: 5,440 long tons (5,530 t)
Length: 457 ft (139.3 m) o/a
Beam: 50 ft (15.2 m)
Draught: 15 ft 9 in (4.80 m)
Installed power: 25,000 shp (19,000 kW)
Propulsion: 4 × Parsons steam turbines
12 × Yarrow boilers
4 × shafts
Speed: 25.5 knots (29.3 mph; 47.2 km/h)
Range: 4,680 nmi (5,390 mi; 8,670 km)10 kn (18.5 km/h; 11.5 mph)
Capacity: Coal: 1,165 short tons (1,057 t) (maximum)
Fuel oil: 235 short tons (213 t)
Complement: 433
Armament: 9 × BL 6 in (152 mm) Mk XII guns
1 × 3 in (76.2 mm) anti-aircraft gun
4 × QF 3-pounder guns
2 × machine guns
2 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes
Armour: 3 inch side amidships
1½ inch side (forward)
1¾ inch side (aft)

HMS Lowestoft was a Town-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy launched on 23 April 1913 from Chatham Dockyard. She was part of the Birmingham subgroup.

She was initially assigned to the 1st Light Cruiser Squadron of the Grand Fleet, and in August 1914 she sank a German merchant ship. On 28 August 1914, she participated in the Battle of Heligoland Bight, and on 24 January 1915 Lowestoft took part in the Battle of Dogger Bank. In February 1915, she was reassigned to the 2nd Light Cruiser Squadron, and in 1916 reassigned again to the 8th Light Cruiser Squadron, operating in the Mediterranean. She survived the war and was sold for scrapping on 8 January 1931 to Ward, of Milford Haven.

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