HMS Maori (F24)

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For other ships of the same name, see HMS Maori.
HMS Maori (F24).jpg
HMS Maori underway
Career Royal Navy Ensign
Name: HMS Maori
Builder: Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Govan
Laid down: 6 June 1936
Launched: 2 September 1937
Commissioned: 2 January 1939
Fate: Sunk 12 February 1942
General characteristics
Type: Tribal-class destroyer
Displacement: 1,850 tons (standard),
2,520 tons (full)
Length: 377 ft o/a (115 m)
Beam: 36 ft 6 in (11.1 m)
Draught: 9 ft (2.75 m)
Propulsion: 3 x Admiralty 3-drum boilers, steam turbines on 2 shafts, 44,000 shp
Speed: 36 knots
Range: 524 tons oil, 5,700 nmi at 15 kn
Complement: 190
Armament:

As designed;

HMS Maori (L24/F24/G24) was a Tribal-class destroyer laid down by the Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Limited, at Govan in Scotland on 6 June 1936, launched on 2 September 1937[1] by Mrs. W. J. Jordan and commissioned on 2 January 1939. She was named after the indigenous Māori people of New Zealand, and Mrs Jordan was the wife of the New Zealand High Commissioner William Jordan.

Maori served with the Mediterranean Fleet, was involved in the pursuit and destruction of the enemy Bismarck in May 1941,[2] and served with the 14th Destroyer Flotilla during the Battle of Cape Bon in December 1941.[3] Maori, commanded by Commander R. E. Courage, RN, was attacked by enemy German aircraft and sank at her moorings in the Malta Grand Harbour on 12 February 1942 with the loss of one of her crew. She was raised and scuttled off Malta on 15 July 1945.

Located a few hundred metres from the shore from Valletta, HMS Maori is now a popular dive site. The bow section lies in white sand at a depth of 14m, the aft section of the ship having been abandoned in deep water during the tow from Grand Harbour to Marsamxett Harbour. Much of the forward superstructure is still extant, including the two front gun bases. Much marine life can be found on the wreck.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Times (London), Friday, 3 September 1937, p.6
  2. ^ The Times (London), Wednesday, 28 May 1941, p.4
  3. ^ The Times (London), Monday, 15 December 1941, p.3

References[edit]

Coordinates: 35°54′17″N 14°31′08″E / 35.90472°N 14.51889°E / 35.90472; 14.51889