HMS Orlando (1886)

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HMSOrlando1897.jpg
Career Royal Navy Ensign
Name: HMS Orlando
Builder: Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow
Laid down: 23 April 1885
Launched: 3 August 1886
Fate: Sold for breaking up 11 July 1905
General characteristics
Displacement: 5,600 tons
Length: 300 ft (91 m) p/p
Beam: 56 ft (17 m)
Draught: 22.5 ft (6.9 m)
Propulsion: 3-cylinder triple-extension steam engines
two shafts
4 double-ended boilers
5,500 hp
8,500 hp forced-draught
Speed: 17 knots natural draught
18 knots forced draught
Range: 10,000 nautical miles (19,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h)
Complement: 484
Armament: 2 × BL 9.2-inch (233.7 mm) Mk V guns (2 x 1)
10 x BL 6-inch (152.4 mm) guns (10 x 1)
6 × 6 pdr guns (6 × 1) QF
10 × 3 pdr guns (10 × 1) QF
6 × 18 in (457 mm) torpedo tubes:
4 above-water broadside
1 bow and 1 stern submerged
Armour: 10 in (254 mm) belt
12 in (304.8 mm) conning tower
For other ships of the same name, see HMS Orlando.

HMS Orlando was the lead ship of the Orlando-class of first-class cruisers built in the yards of Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow and launched on 3 August 1886.

Service history[edit]

She was commanded by Charles Ramsay Arbuthnot on the Australia Station from 1892 to 1895. In 1899 she was assigned to the China Station.[1] During the Boxer Rebellion in 1900, sailors from HMS Orlando formed part of the force led by Vice-Admiral Sir Edward Seymour attempting to relieve the British Legation in Beijing. A replica of a bell captured from the Taku Forts forms part of a memorial to HMS Orlando in Victoria Park, Portsmouth.

In late March 1902 she left Hong Kong for Singapore, arriving there 6 April.[2]

HMS Orlando was sold for scrapping on 11 July 1905 to Ward of Morecambe for £10,000.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bastock, pp.98–99.
  2. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence" The Times (London). Wednesday, 9 April 1902. (36737), p. 10.

References[edit]

External links[edit]