HMS Queen Charlotte (1810)

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For other ships of the same name, see HMS Queen Charlotte.
Nicolaas Baur - Krijgsraad aan boord van de 'Queen Charlotte'.jpg
Council of war on board the Queen Charlotte, 1818
Career (UK) Royal Navy Ensign
Name: HMS Queen Charlotte
Ordered: 9 July 1801
Builder: Deptford Dockyard
Laid down: October 1805
Launched: 17 July 1810[1]
Commissioned: January 1813
Fate: Sold, 12 January 1892
General characteristics [2]
Class & type: 104-gun first-rate ship of the line
Tons burthen: 2289 bm
Length: 190 ft 0 12 in (57.9 m) (gundeck)
Beam: 52 ft 5 34 in (16.0 m)
Depth of hold: 22 ft 4 in (6.8 m)
Propulsion: Sails
Sail plan: Full rigged ship
Armament:

104 guns:

  • Gundeck: 30 × 32 pdrs
  • Middle gundeck: 30 × 24 pdrs
  • Upper gundeck: 30 × 12 pdrs
  • Quarterdeck: 2 × 12 pdrs, 12 × 32 pdr carronades
  • Forecastle: 2 × 12 pdrs, 2 × 32 pdr carronades
  • Poop deck: 6 × 18 pdr carronades

HMS Queen Charlotte was a 104-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 17 July 1810 at Deptford. She was built to the lines of Sir Edward Hunt's Royal George as a replacement for the first HMS Queen Charlotte which had been lost by accident on 17 March 1800.[1][2]

She was Lord Exmouth's flagship during the Bombardment of Algiers in 1816.

The Queen Charlotte was converted to serve as a training ship in 1859 and renamed HMS Excellent. She was eventually sold out of the service to be broken up in 1892.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b The Times (London), Wednesday, 18 July 1810, p.3
  2. ^ a b c Lavery, Ships of the Line vol.1, p187.

References[edit]

  • Lavery, Brian (2003): The Ship of the Line - Volume 1: The development of the battlefleet 1650-1850. Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-252-8.
  • Winfield, Rif (2008): British Warships in the Age of Sail: 1793 - 1817. Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84415-717-4.