United States Department of the Army

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Not to be confused with United States Army.
Department of the Army
DA
United States Department of the Army Seal.svg
Agency overview
Formed 1947
Preceding Agency Department of War
Jurisdiction  United States Army
Headquarters The Pentagon, Arlington County, Virginia, U.S.
Agency executive John M. McHugh (Secretary)
Parent agency Department of Defense
Website www.army.mil

The Department of the Army (DA) is one of the three military departments within the Department of Defense of the United States of America. The Department of the Army is the Federal Government agency within which the United States Army is organized, and it is led by the Secretary of the Army who has statutory authority 10 U.S.C. § 3013 to conduct its affairs and to prescribe regulations for its government, subject to the limits of the law, and the directions of the Secretary of Defense and the President.

The Secretary of the Army is a civilian official appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. The highest-ranking military officer in the department is the Chief of Staff of the Army, who is also a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Other senior officials of the Department are the Under Secretary of the Army (principal deputy to the Secretary) and the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army (principal deputy to the Chief of Staff.)

The Department of War was originally formed in 1789 as an Executive Department of the United States, and was renamed by the National Security Act of 1947 to the Department of the Army on September 18, 1947. By amendments to the National Security Act of 1947 in 1949, the Department of the Army was transformed to its present-day status.

Organizational structure[edit]

The Department of the Army is a Military Department within the United States Department of Defense. The Department is headed by the Secretary of the Army, who by statute must be a civilian, appointed by the President with the confirmation by the United States Senate. The Secretary of the Army is responsible for, and has the authority to conduct all the affairs of the Department of the Army, subject to the authority, direction and control of the Secretary of Defense. The Department of the Army is divided between its Headquarters at the Seat of Government and the field organizations of the Army.

By direction of the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Army assigns Army forces, apart from those units performing duties enumerated in 10 U.S.C. § 3013 (i.e. organize, train & equip) or unless otherwise directed, to the operational command of the Commanders of the Combatant Commands. Only the Secretary of Defense (and the President) has the authority to approve transfer of forces to and from Combatant Commands. 10 U.S.C. § 162.

Headquarters, Department of the Army[edit]

Chart summarizing the organization of the Department of the Army's Headquarters as of 2010.

Headquarters, Department of the Army is the corporate office of the Department which exercises directive and supervisory functions and consists of two separate staffs; the Office of the Secretary of the Army (10 U.S.C. § 3014), the mainly civilian staff; and the Army Staff (10 U.S.C. § 3031 & 10 U.S.C. § 3032), the mainly military staff. The Office of the Secretary and the Army Staff are organized along similar lines, with civilians and military officers both overseeing similar program areas.

Civilian Military
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Deputy Chief of Staff (G1-Personnel)
Deputy Chief of Staff (G3/5/7-Operations)
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations and Environment Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works Chief of Engineers
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology Deputy Chief of Staff (G4-Logistics)
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Financial Management and Comptroller Deputy Chief of Staff (G8-Financial Management)
General Counsel of the Army Deputy Chief of Staff (G2-Intelligence)

Office of the Secretary[edit]

The Office of the Secretary is led by the Secretary of the Army, assisted by the Under Secretary of the Army and the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army, who is the senior civilian career official of the Department. The Office of the Secretary of the Army, also known as the Army Secretariat, is divided into multiple branches with functional responsibilities, the six most important of which are headed by one of the five Assistant Secretaries of the Army or the General Counsel of the Army, each of whom are civilians appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

The Army Staff[edit]

The Army Staff is led by the Chief of Staff of the Army, a four-star general who is the highest-ranking officer in the Army and the Army member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Chief of Staff is assisted in managing the Army Staff by the Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army, a four-star general and second-highest-ranking officer in the Army. The Army Staff is divided into several directorates, each headed by a three-star general.

A key official within the Army Staff is the Director of the Army Staff, who is a three-star general. The Director is responsible for integrating and synchronizing the work of the Office of the Secretary and the Army Staff so that they meet the goals and priorities of the Secretary of the Army. Other key figures within the Army Staff are the Sergeant Major of the Army, the United States Army Judge Advocate General, the Chief of the Army Reserve, the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, the United States Army Provost Marshal General, and the United States Army Surgeon General

Field Organizations[edit]

Army Commands (ACOM) Current commander Location of headquarters
United States Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) GEN David G. Perkins Fort Eustis, Virginia
United States Army Materiel Command (AMC) GEN Dennis L. Via Redstone Arsenal, Alabama
United States Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) GEN Mark A. Milley Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Army Service Component Commands (ASCC) Current commander Location of headquarters
United States Army Central (ARCENT) LTG James L. Terry Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina
United States Army North (ARNORTH) LTG Perry L. Wiggins Fort Sam Houston, Texas
United States Army South (ARSOUTH) MG Joseph P. DiSalvo Fort Sam Houston, Texas
United States Army Africa (USARAF) MG Darryl A. Williams Caserma Ederle, Italy
United States Army Europe and Seventh Army (USAREUR) LTG Donald M. Campbell, Jr. Campbell Barracks, Germany
United States Army Pacific (USARPAC) GEN Vincent K. Brooks Fort Shafter, Hawaii
United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) LTG Charles T. Cleveland Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (SDDC) MG Thomas J. Richardson Scott AFB, Illinois
United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command/United States Army Strategic (USASMDC/ARSTRAT) LTG Richard P. Formica Redstone Arsenal, Alabama
Field army headquarters Current commander Location of headquarters
Eighth United States Army (EUSA) LTG Bernard S. Champoux Yongsan Garrison, Seoul
First United States Army (FUSA) LTG Michael S. Tucker Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois
Direct Reporting Units (DRU) Current commander Location of headquarters
United States Military Academy (USMA) LTG Robert L. Caslen West Point, New York
United States Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) LTG David D. Halverson San Antonio, Texas
Army Network Enterprise Technology Command (NETCOM) MG John B. Morrison, Jr. Fort Huachuca, Arizona
United States Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM) MG George J. Franz III Fort Belvoir, Virginia
U.S. Army Test & Evaluation Command (ATEC) MG Peter D. Utley[1] Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland
United States Army Criminal Investigation Command (USACIDC) MG David E. Quantock Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia
United States Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) LTG Patricia Horoho Fort Sam Houston, Texas
United States Army Military District of Washington (MDW) MG Jeffrey S. Buchanan Fort McNair, Washington, D.C.
United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) LTG Thomas P. Bostick Washington, D.C.
United States Army Reserve Command (USARC) LTG Jeffrey W. Talley Fort Bragg, North Carolina
United States Army Cyber Command (ARCYBER)[2][3] LTG Edward C. Cardon Fort Belvoir, Virginia

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ Utley, Peter. "CG, ATEC". US Army. Retrieved July 2013. 
  2. ^ http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/go1026.pdf
  3. ^ "Army establishes CYBER Command". Army.mil. Retrieved 2011-12-13. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]