HR 5256

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HR 5256
Observation data
Epoch 2000      Equinox 2000
Constellation Ursa Major
Right ascension 13h 57m 32.0575s[1]
Declination +61° 29′ 34.301″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.520[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type K3 V[3]
U−B color index 0.98[4]
B−V color index 1.01[4]
Variable type None
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) −25.3[5] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: −32.32[1] mas/yr
Dec.: +216.49[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 98.97 ± 0.56[1] mas
Distance 33.0 ± 0.2 ly
(10.10 ± 0.06 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 6.85
Details
Mass 0.800[6] M
Radius 0.78[6] R
Surface gravity (log g) 4.54[7] cgs
Temperature 4,843[7] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] = 0.17[7]
Other designations
BD+62 1325,Giclas 239-008, HD 122064, HIP 68184, HR 5256, LTT 14084, SAO SAO 16230.[8]

HR 5256 is a solitary, K-type main sequence star located thirty-three light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. It has an estimated 80% of the Sun's mass and 78% of the Sun's radius.[6] The space velocity components of this star are (U, V, W) = (−2, −10, −25) km/s.[4] HR 5256 will make its closest approach to the Sun in about 333,000 ± 16,000 years, when it will be at a distance of 3.9 ± 0.2 parsecs.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Perryman, M. A. C.; et al. (July 1997). "The HIPPARCOS Catalogue". Astronomy & Astrophysics 323: L49–L52. Bibcode:1997A&A...323L..49P. 
  2. ^ Oja, T. (August 1991). "UBV photometry of stars whose positions are accurately known. VI". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series 89 (2): 415–419. Bibcode:1991A&AS...89..415O. 
  3. ^ Marrese, P. M.; Boschi, F.; Munari, U. (August 2003). "High resolution spectroscopy over lambda lambda 8500-8750 Å for GAIA. IV. Extending the cool MK stars sample". Astronomy and Astrophysics 406: 995–999. Bibcode:2003A&A...406..995M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20030647. 
  4. ^ a b c "ARICNS 4C04262". ARICNS. Astronomisches Rechen-Institut Heidelberg. March 4, 1998. Retrieved 2010-12-07. 
  5. ^ Wilson, Ralph Elmer (1953). General Catalogue of Stellar Radial Velocities. Washington: Carnegie Institution of Washington. Bibcode:1953QB901.W495..... 
  6. ^ a b c Takeda, Genya; et al. (February 2007). "Structure and Evolution of Nearby Stars with Planets. II. Physical Properties of ~1000 Cool Stars from the SPOCS Catalog". The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 168 (2): 297–318. arXiv:astro-ph/0607235. Bibcode:2007ApJS..168..297T. doi:10.1086/509763.  Data obtained from a VizieR query.
  7. ^ a b c Soubiran, C.; Bienaymé, O.; Mishenina, T. V.; Kovtyukh, V. V. (March 2008). "Vertical distribution of Galactic disk stars. IV. AMR and AVR from clump giants". Astronomy and Astrophysics 480 (1): 91–101. arXiv:0712.1370. Bibcode:2008A&A...480...91S. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078788. 
  8. ^ "G 239-8 -- High proper-motion Star". SIMBAD. Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2010-12-07. 
  9. ^ García-Sánchez, J.; et al. (November 2001). "Stellar encounters with the solar system". Astronomy and Astrophysics 379: 634–659. Bibcode:2001A&A...379..634G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20011330.