HD 158633

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HD 158633
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Draco
Right ascension 17h 25m 00.0985s[1]
Declination +67° 18′ 24.137″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.43[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type K0 V[2]
U−B color index +0.29[3]
B−V color index +0.76[3]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) −40[4] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: −531.03[1] mas/yr
Dec.: 3.62[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 78.14 ± 0.51[1] mas
Distance 41.7 ± 0.3 ly
(12.80 ± 0.08 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 5.89[5]
Details
Radius 0.86[6] R
Surface gravity (log g) 4.80[7] cgs
Temperature 5,400[7] K
Metallicity −0.43 ± 0.08[8]
Age 4.27 × 109[8] years
Other designations
GJ 675, HR 6518, BD +67°1014, HD 158633, LHS 287, LTT 15185, GCTP 3972.00, SAO 17474, HIP 85235.[2]

HD 158633 is a main sequence star in the constellation Draco. This star is too faint to be observed with the unaided eye, but can be seen with a small telescope. It has a spectral classification of K0 V and has about 86% of the Sun's radius.[6] This star is emitting an excess of infrared radiation at a wavelength of 70 μm.[8] It has a low metallicity, with only 37% of the Sun's abundance of elements more massive than helium, and has a relatively high proper motion.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Perryman, M. A. C. et al. (1997), The Hipparcos Catalogue, Astronomy & Astrophysics 323: L49–L52, Bibcode:1997A&A...323L..49P 
  2. ^ a b c d "LHS 3287 -- High proper-motion Star". SIMBAD. Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  3. ^ a b Hauck, B.; Mermilliod, M. (1998). "uvbyβ photoelectric photometric catalogue". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series 129: 431–433. Bibcode:1998A&AS..129..431H. doi:10.1051/aas:1998195. 
  4. ^ Wilson, Ralph Elmer (1953). General catalogue of stellar radial velocities. Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution of Washington. Bibcode:1953GCRV..C......0W. 
  5. ^ Kovtyukh, V. V.; Soubiran, C.; Belik, S. I. (2004). "A new Böhm-Vitense gap in the temperature range 5560 to 5610 K in the main sequence". Astronomy and Astrophysics 427: 933–936. arXiv:astro-ph/0409753. Bibcode:2004A&A...427..933K. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20041449. 
  6. ^ a b Pasinetti Fracassini, L. E.; Pastori, L.; Covino, S.; Pozzi, A. (2001). "Catalogue of Apparent Diameters and Absolute Radii of Stars (CADARS) - Third edition - Comments and statistics". Astronomy and Astrophysics 367: 521–524. arXiv:astro-ph/0012289. Bibcode:2001A&A...367..521P. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20000451. 
  7. ^ a b Luck, R. Earle; Heiter, Ulrike (2006). "Dwarfs in the Local Region". The Astronomical Journal 131: 3069–3092. Bibcode:2006AJ....131.3069L. doi:10.1086/504080. 
  8. ^ a b c Beichman, C. A. et al (2006). "New Debris Disks Around Nearby Main-Sequence Stars: Impact on the Direct Detection of Planets". The Astrophysical Journal 652 (2): 1674–1693. arXiv:astro-ph/0611682. Bibcode:2006ApJ...652.1674B. doi:10.1086/508449.