HTC Windows Phone 8S

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Windows Phone 8S by HTC
HTC Windows Phone 8S.jpg
Manufacturer HTC Corporation
Compatible networks GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/900/1800/1900
HSPA 900/2100
First released December 7, 2012 (Canada)
Related Windows Phone 8X by HTC
Type Smartphone
Form factor Slate
Dimensions 120.5 x 63 x 10.28 mm
Weight 113 g
Operating system Windows Phone 8
System on chip Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 MSM8627
CPU 1.0 GHz dual-core Qualcomm Krait
GPU Qualcomm Adreno 305
Memory 4 GB internal flash (1.1 GB available)[1]
512 MB RAM
Removable storage MicroSD (up to 32GB)
Battery 1700 mAh Li-ion battery
Data inputs Multi-touch capacitive touchscreen, proximity sensor, ambient light sensor
Display 4" S-LCD
800 x 480 px (WVGA)
Rear camera 5 Megapixels, 720p video recording
Front camera None
Connectivity Bluetooth 3.1+EDR

The Windows Phone 8S by HTC was announced by HTC Corporation on September 19, 2012 and released on December 7, 2012 in Canada.[2][3] It is a cheaper, lower-end version of the Windows Phone 8X by HTC. Despite its availability in Canada, HTC announced that the 8S will not be sold in the United States because the company plans to focus instead on the 8X, which is considered its signature phone on the Windows operating system.[4][5]

Because of the limited memory available on this phone, certain applications and features will not be able to run.[6]

Availability[edit]

In Canada, the HTC 8S was first available released for Virgin Mobile Canada on December 7, 2012.[3] HTC plans to make the 8S available at Koodo Mobile, Mobilicity and Wind Mobile in 2013.[7]

Reception[edit]

One week after launching the device, Virgin Mobile Canada reported that the phone has been "flying off the shelves". At that time, the Mobile Syrup blog stated that the 8S was "the best deal on a no-contract phone at the moment" [8] The blog also praised the device's size and design, and claimed that the phone "makes a number of compromises […] but it’s still able to perform […] well".

Ewan Spence from All About Windows Phone wrote: "While there are clear use cases for the 8S (and I can think of a few people in my family that would get by easily with the 8S) it feels like a missed opportunity. It's going to fall seriously short with anyone who is looking to really push the Windows Phone 8 platform."[9]

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