Hachinohe Domain

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Miyagi-jinja in Hachinohe, on the site of Hachinohe Castle

Hachinohe Domain (八戸藩 Hachinohe-han?) was a tozama feudal domain of Edo period Japan[1] It is located in Mutsu Province, Honshū. Its territory included 41 villages in Sannohe District, 38 villages in Kunohe District, and 4 villages in Shiwa District, with a total revenue of 22,000 koku. The domain was centered at Hachinohe Castle, located in the center of what is now the city of Hachinohe in Aomori Prefecture.

History[edit]

Hachinohe Domain had a somewhat ambiguous status in that it was regarded as a sub-domain of Morioka Domain and ruled by a branch of the Nambu clan, although it had been established by order of the Tokugawa Shogunate, was subject to the sankin kotai regulations, and was allowed to maintain a castle (which was permitted only to independent domains). Its status was clarified in 1812, when the domain's residence in Edo burned down, and the 10th daimyō of Morioka Domain, Nambu Toshitaka, refused to assist with its rebuilding, citing the "independence" of Hachinohe.

During the Boshin War of the Meiji Restoration, Nambu Nobuyuki supported the Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei and joined with the forces of Morioka Domain at the Battle of Noheji against the pro-imperial forces of Hirosaki Domain and Kuroishi Domain. Afterwards, however, though secret diplomacy with Kubota Domain, he was able to escape punishment by the new Meiji government. In July 1871, with the abolition of the han system, Hachinohe Domain became Hachinohe Prefecture, and was merged into the newly created Aomori Prefecture in September 1871.

List of daimyo[edit]

Name Tenure Courtesy title Court Rank Revenue
1 Nambu Naofusa (南部直房?) 1664–1668 Saemon-no-sho Lower 5th (従五位下) 20,000 koku
2 Nambu Naomasa ( 南部直政?) 1668–1699 Tōtōmi-no-kami Lower 4th (従四位下) 20,000 koku
3 Nambu Michinobu (南部通信?) 1699–1716 Tōtōmi-no-kami Lower 5th (従五位下) 20,000 koku
4 Nambu Hironobu (南部広信?) 1716–1741 Kai-no-kami Lower 5th (従五位下) 20,000 koku
5 Nambu Nobuoki (南部信興?) 1741–1765 Saemon-no-sho Lower 5th (従五位下) 20,000 koku
6 Nambu Nobuyori (南部信依?) 1765–1781 Kai-no-kami Lower 5th (従五位下) 20,000 koku
7 Nambu Nobufusa (南部信房?) 1781–1796 Ise-no-kami Lower 5th (従五位下) 20,000 koku
8 Nambu Nobumasa (南部信真?) 1796–1842 Saemon-no-sho Lower 5th (従五位下) 20,000 koku
9 Nambu Nobuyuki (南部信順?) 1842–1871 Tōtōmi-no-kami, Jiju Lower 4th (従四位下) 20,000 koku

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Map of Japan, 1789 -- the Han system affected cartography

References[edit]

  • The content of this article was largely derived from that of the corresponding article on Japanese Wikipedia.
  • Papinot, E (1910). Historical and Geographic Dictionary of Japan. Tuttle (reprint) 1972. 
  • (Japanese) Hachinohe on "Edo 300 HTML"
  • Sasaki Suguru (2004). Boshin Sensō 戊辰戦争. Tokyo: Chuokōron-shinsha.