Haddon Heights, New Jersey

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Haddon Heights, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Haddon Heights
Haddon Heights highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Haddon Heights highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Haddon Heights, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Haddon Heights, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°52′45″N 75°03′57″W / 39.879127°N 75.065918°W / 39.879127; -75.065918Coordinates: 39°52′45″N 75°03′57″W / 39.879127°N 75.065918°W / 39.879127; -75.065918[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated March 2, 1904
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Edward Forte (term ends December 31, 2015)[3][4]
 • Clerk Kelly Santosusso[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.574 sq mi (4.076 km2)
 • Land 1.569 sq mi (4.063 km2)
 • Water 0.005 sq mi (0.014 km2)  0.33%
Area rank 444th of 566 in state
22nd of 37 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 59 ft (18 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 7,473
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 7,611
 • Rank 306th of 566 in state
18th of 37 in county[12]
 • Density 4,764.1/sq mi (1,839.4/km2)
 • Density rank 116th of 566 in state
11th of 37 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08035[13][14]
Area code(s) 856[15]
FIPS code 3400728800[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885239[18][2]
Website www.haddonhts.com

Haddon Heights is a borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 7,473,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 74 (-1.0%) from the 7,547 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 313 (-4.0%) from the 7,860 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Haddon Heights was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 2, 1904, from portions of the now-defunct Centre Township and parts of Haddon Township.[20] Haddon Heights is a dry town where alcohol cannot be sold.[21][22]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Haddon Heights as the 98th best place to live in New Jersey in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey,[23] and the borough has also been listed among its "Classic Towns of Greater Philadelphia" by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission.[24] In 2011, New Jersey Monthly named Haddon Heights the second best town to live in Southern New Jersey, after Moorestown Township.[25]

Geography[edit]

Haddon Heights is located at 39°52′45″N 75°03′57″W / 39.879127°N 75.065918°W / 39.879127; -75.065918 (39.879127,-75.065918). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.574 square miles (4.076 km2), of which, 1.569 square miles (4.063 km2) of it was land and 0.005 square miles (0.014 km2) of it (0.33%) was water.[2][1]

The borough borders Audubon, Mount Ephraim, Barrington, Bellmawr, and Haddonfield.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 1,452
1920 2,950 103.2%
1930 5,394 82.8%
1940 5,555 3.0%
1950 7,287 31.2%
1960 9,260 27.1%
1970 9,365 1.1%
1980 8,361 −10.7%
1990 7,860 −6.0%
2000 7,547 −4.0%
2010 7,473 −1.0%
Est. 2012 7,611 [11] 1.8%
Population sources:
1910-2000[26] 1910-1920[27]
1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,473 people, 2,997 households, and 2,023 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,764.1 per square mile (1,839.4 /km2). There were 3,159 housing units at an average density of 2,013.9 per square mile (777.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.45% (7,133) White, 1.12% (84) Black or African American, 0.16% (12) Native American, 1.31% (98) Asian, 0.07% (5) Pacific Islander, 0.54% (40) from other races, and 1.35% (101) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.65% (198) of the population.[8]

There were 2,997 households, of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.6% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.5% were non-families. 28.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.10.[8]

In the borough, 22.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 23.9% from 25 to 44, 30.7% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.6 years. For every 100 females there were 91.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.9 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $82,663 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,335) and the median family income was $101,943 (+/- $5,362). Males had a median income of $75,785 (+/- $5,098) versus $58,912 (+/- $4,731) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $40,913 (+/- $3,618). About 0.0% of families and 1.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over.[33]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 7,547 people, 3,039 households, and 2,039 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,855.5 people per square mile (1,879.9/km2). There were 3,136 housing units at an average density of 2,017.6 per square mile (781.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.97% White, 0.40% African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.65% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.27% from other races, and 0.57% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.05% of the population.[31][32]

There were 3,039 households out of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.4% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.9% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.09.[31][32]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.1% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 24.2% from 45 to 64, and 18.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 89.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.3 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the borough was $58,424, and the median income for a family was $73,460. Males had a median income of $51,572 versus $35,208 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,198. About 1.0% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Haddon Heights is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6]

The Reorganization Meeting of the governing body is held on the first Saturday in January. At this meeting, the newly elected Council members take the oath of office and a Council President, who serves as Acting Mayor when the Mayor is absent, is elected by the Council. Appointments for the coming year are announced by the Mayor and confirmed by the Council when required by law.[34]

As of 2013, the mayor of Haddon Heights is Edward S. Forte, Jr., whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Kathryn Lange (2014), Stephen D. Berryhill (2016), Richard DiRenzo (2014), Rose Fitzgerald (2013), Susan Griffith (2016), and Jack D. Merryfield, Jr. (2016).[4]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Haddon Heights is located in the 1st Congressional District[35] and is part of New Jersey's 5th state legislative district.[9][36][37]

The seat for New Jersey's First Congressional District is currently vacant, having formerly been represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights), who resigned on February 18, 2014.[38] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[39][40] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[41][42]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 5th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Donald Norcross (D, Camden) and in the General Assembly by Angel Fuentes (D, Camden) and Gilbert "Whip" Wilson (D, Camden).[43] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[44] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[45]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, its seven members elected at-large to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[46] As of 2013, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term ends December 31, 2014)[47], Freeholder Deputy Director Edward McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, 2013)[48], Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015)[49], Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015)[50], Scot N. McCray (Camden, 2014)[51], Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015)[52] and Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2013).[53][54][55] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk Joseph Ripa,[56] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham[57] and Surrogate Patricia Egan Jones.[58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,754 registered voters in Haddon Heights, of which 2,137 (37.1%) were registered as Democrats, 1,310 (22.8%) were registered as Republicans and 2,300 (40.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered to other parties.[59]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 55.8% of the vote here (2,548 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 41.4% (1,893 votes), with 4,568 ballots cast among the borough's 5,586 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.8%.[60] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 53.2% of the vote here (2,411 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 45.1% (2,045 votes), with 4,534 ballots cast among the borough's 5,562 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 81.5.[61]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 47.4% of the vote here (1,450 ballots cast), ahead of both Democrat Jon Corzine with 43.7% (1,338 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 6.4% (195 votes), with 3,059 ballots cast among the borough's 5,680 registered voters, yielding a 53.9% turnout.[62]

Education[edit]

The Haddon Heights School District serves public school students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[63]) are three elementary schools — Atlantic Avenue Elementary School[64] (175 students; grades K-6), Glenview Elementary School[65] (194; PreK-6) and Seventh Avenue Elementary School[66] (133; K-6) — and Haddon Heights High School[67] for grades 7-12 (763).[68] The districts' high school also serves students from the neighboring communities of Barrington and Lawnside who attend the high school as part of sending/receiving relationships.[69][70]

St. Rose of Lima School, founded in 1921, is an elementary school that operates under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden.[71][72]

Baptist Regional School is a private, co-educational K-12 college-preparatory school governed by a board of directors in association with Haddon Heights Baptist Church (GARBC). The school offers an integrated curriculum with a conservative Christian worldview.[73]

History[edit]

Joseph Bloomfield

The land that was to become Haddon Heights was settled in 1699 by John Hinchman. In 1713, John Siddon built a farmhouse near Hinchman's property. John Thorn Glover dammed King's Run and constructed a mill race and fulling mill on this property before 1776. Jacob Hinchman built a frame dwelling no later than 1720 that was later enlarged by American Revolutionary War hero Col. Joseph Ellis. New Jersey governor Joseph Bloomfield later purchased this property.

Benjamin A. Lippincott, in 1890, constructed a passenger station in the center of his land for the Atlantic City Railroad. Then Lippincott, with Charles Hillman, filed a grid street plan with Camden County to develop a community. They named it Haddon Heights because of its proximity to Haddonfield and its high elevation. Large houses were constructed that appealed to prosperous middle-class families moving from the cities. In 1904, Haddon Heights was incorporated as a borough and Lippincott was elected mayor. A small downtown grew near the railroad and the White Horse Pike and eight churches and a synagogue were built. An area of old Centre Township, known as Fairfield Estates, voted in 1926 to become part of Haddon Heights. This land was developed for more single-family housing through the 1940s and 1950s. Even though rail passenger service ceased in July 1965, Haddon Heights remains a typical turn-of-the-twentieth-century railroad suburb with tree-shaded streets and comfortable homes.

Transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit local bus service between the borough and Philadelphia is provided on the 400 and 403 routes, with local service available on the 455 and 457 routes.[74] Commuter train service to Philadelphia is available using the PATCO Speedline. The closest stops are Westmont and Haddonfield.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Haddon Heights include: Notable current and former residents of Haddon Heights include:

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Mayor and Council, Borough of Haddon Heights. Accessed October 4, 2013.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Haddon heights. Accessed July 30, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 28.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Haddon Heights, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
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  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 3. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Haddon Heights borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 5, 2012.
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  82. ^ Billy Lange profile, CSTV. Accessed July 17, 2007. "A native of Haddon Heights, N.J., Lange played basketball at Bishop Eustace Preparatory School for his father, Bill Lange Sr., and at Rowan College before moving into the coaching ranks in 1995."
  83. ^ via Associated Press. "Willie Mosconi, 80; Was Champion Billiards Player", The Seattle Times, September 18, 1993. Accessed January 2, 2011. "HADDON HEIGHTS, N.J. - Willie Mosconi, a world champion billiards player over nearly two decades, died at his home here. He was 80. Mr. Mosconi, who lived in Haddon Heights for nearly 40 years, died Sept. 17 of a heart attack."
  84. ^ Staff. "Pitching for the home team, South Philly's Mike Koplove out to make the Phils.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, February 20, 2009. Accessed January 2, 2011. "Blaine Neal, who hails from Bishop Eustace Prep and Haddon Heights, was also on that team.
  85. ^ Breznican, Anthony. Spielberg's family values, USA Today, June 23, 2005. "I first became aware of the sky when my father pointed out the Perseid meteor shower to me when I was about 6 years old, living in Haddon Heights, N.J.,"
  86. ^ Biography, Composers Bureau / Stokes, Eric

External links[edit]