Haddon Township, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Haddon Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Haddon
Haddon Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in New Jersey.
Haddon Township highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Haddon Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Haddon Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°54′22″N 75°03′47″W / 39.906216°N 75.062951°W / 39.906216; -75.062951Coordinates: 39°54′22″N 75°03′47″W / 39.906216°N 75.062951°W / 39.906216; -75.062951[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated February 23, 1865
Government[5]
 • Type Walsh Act
 • Mayor Randall W. "Randy" Teague (term ends May 15, 2015)[3]
 • Clerk Dawn M. Pennock[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.791 sq mi (7.231 km2)
 • Land 2.687 sq mi (6.960 km2)
 • Water 0.104 sq mi (0.271 km2)  3.74%
Area rank 353rd of 566 in state
14th of 37 in county[2]
Elevation [6] 20 ft (6 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 14,707
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 14,708
 • Rank 171st of 566 in state
8th of 37 in county[11]
 • Density 5,472.6/sq mi (2,113.0/km2)
 • Density rank 97th of 566 in state
8th of 37 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08104, 08107, 08108[12][13]
Area code(s) 856[14]
FIPS code 3400728740[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882156[17][2]
Website www.haddontwp.com

Haddon Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 14,707,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 56 (+0.4%) from the 14,651 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 186 (-1.3%) from the 14,837 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

By an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 23, 1865, Haddon Township was incorporated from portions of Newton Township. The following communities were subsequently created from the Haddon Township: Haddonfield (April 6, 1875), Collingswood (May 22, 1888), Woodlynne (March 19, 1901), Haddon Heights (March 2, 1904), Audubon (March 13, 1905) and Oaklyn (also March 13, 1905).[19]

Haddon Township has two exclaves, West Collingswood Heights and West Collingswood Extension. The downtown portion of the township is known as Westmont, a name probably derived from a noted harness racing horse.[20] Haddon Township allows sales of alcohols, and has several restaurants which serve alcohol, and bars, unlike the neighboring boroughs of Collingswood, Haddonfield and Haddon Heights which prohibit the sale of alcohol.

History[edit]

In 1701, Elizabeth Haddon Estaugh, the daughter of John Haddon, arrived in the American colonies to oversee his large landholdings, which included areas that are now Collingswood, Haddon Township, and Haddonfield. Contemporary Newton Township included land that later became part of Audubon, Audubon Park, Camden, Collingswood, Gloucester City, Haddon Heights, Haddonfield, Oaklyn, and Woodlynne. Its first European settlers were Irish who settled in the area of Newton Creek in 1681.

Saddlertown[edit]

In the late 1830s, a runaway slave, who had taken the surname Saddler to avoid detection by his former master, came to New Jersey from a Maryland plantation with his wife and two daughters. Saddler worked for Cy Evans, a local Quaker farmer, from whom he bought fifty acres to farm.[21] The area where Saddler settled became a predominantly black community known as Saddlertown, a stop on the Underground Railroad. Today, Saddlertown is racially diverse.[21]

Geography[edit]

Haddon Township is located at 39°54′22″N 75°03′47″W / 39.906216°N 75.062951°W / 39.906216; -75.062951 (39.906216,-75.062951). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 2.791 square miles (7.231 km2), of which, 2.687 square miles (6.960 km2) of it was land and 0.104 square miles (0.271 km2) of it (3.74%) was water.[2][1]

Haddon Township borders Audubon, Audubon Park, Camden, Cherry Hill (water border), Collingswood, Gloucester City, Haddonfield, Mount Ephraim, and Oaklyn.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,926
1880 1,071 * −44.4%
1890 888 * −17.1%
1900 2,012 126.6%
1910 1,465 * −27.2%
1920 2,708 84.8%
1930 9,198 239.7%
1940 9,708 5.5%
1950 12,379 27.5%
1960 17,099 38.1%
1970 18,192 6.4%
1980 15,875 −12.7%
1990 14,837 −6.5%
2000 14,651 −1.3%
2010 14,707 0.4%
Est. 2012 14,708 [10] 0.0%
Population sources: 1870-2000[22]
1870-1920[23] 1870[24][25] 1880-1890[26]
1890-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[19]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 14,707 people, 6,226 households, and 3,860 families residing in the township. The population density was 5,472.6 per square mile (2,113.0 /km2). There were 6,477 housing units at an average density of 2,410.1 per square mile (930.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.16% (13,701) White, 1.50% (220) Black or African American, 0.16% (23) Native American, 2.71% (398) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 1.11% (163) from other races, and 1.36% (200) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.95% (581) of the population.[7]

There were 6,226 households, of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.0% were non-families. 32.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 3.04.[7]

In the township, 21.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 25.7% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 17.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 93.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.3 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $70,392 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,948) and the median family income was $90,156 (+/- $6,251). Males had a median income of $60,221 (+/- $5,315) versus $52,179 (+/- $4,167) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,506 (+/- $2,687). About 3.6% of families and 6.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.4% of those under age 18 and 9.9% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 14,651 people, 6,207 households, and 3,891 families residing in the township. The population density was 5,443.4 people per square mile (2,102.9/km²). There were 6,423 housing units at an average density of 2,386.4 per square mile (921.9/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 95.42% White, 1.18% African American, 0.05% Native American, 2.01% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.56% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.54% of the population.[30][31]

There were 6,207 households out of which 27.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.9% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.3% were non-families. 33.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 3.05.[30][31]

In the township the population was spread out with 22.6% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to 64, and 20.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 88.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.4 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the township was $51,076, and the median income for a family was $65,269. Males had a median income of $44,943 versus $32,967 for females. The per capita income for the township was $25,610. About 1.6% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.3% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Under the Walsh Act, Haddon Township has been governed by a three-member commission since 1950.[33] Commission members are elected at-large in nonpartisan elections to serve four-year concurrent terms.[5]

Each commissioner is responsible for supervising an assigned department. The three commissioners vote among themselves to choose a part-time mayor, who presides over meetings but has no independent executive function. Haddon Township has had only three mayors in its history: William Rohrer, William J. Park. Jr., (1997 New Jersey State League of Municipalities Mayors Hall of Fame),[34] and Randall Teague.

As of 2013, members of the Haddon Township Committee are Mayor Randall W. "Randy" Teague (I, Commissioner of Public Works, Parks and Public Property), Paul Dougherty (R, Commissioner of Public Affairs and Public Safety) and John Foley (D, Commissioner of Revenue and Finance), all serving terms of office that end May 15, 2015.[35]

Emergency services[edit]

Haddon Township is divided into four fire districts, each governed by five elected fire commissioners. Fire District 1 is the Westmont and Bluebird section, protected by the Westmont Fire Company No. 1, which was established in 1902.[36] Fire District 2 is the West Collingswood Extension section, which contracts with the Borough of Collingswood for fire protection from the Collingswood Fire Department (Station 16-1). Fire District 3 is the Bettlewood, Heather Glen, and Heather Woods sections and it contracts with the Westmont Fire Company Number 1 for fire protection from District 1. Fire District 4 is the West Collingswood Heights section, protected by the West Collingswood Heights Fire Co. Westmont Fire Co. (Station 15-1) and West Collingswood Heights Fire Co. (Station 15-2) are both Haddon Township companies, but separate entities with their own chiefs.[37]

Ambulance service throughout the Township is also divided, mirroring the fire service.

The Westmont Fire Company No. 1 provides both fire and EMS services. John D. Medes has served as Chief since 2007.

Police coverage throughout the entire township is provided by the Haddon Township Police Department. The department also provides services for Audubon Park, NJ[38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Haddon Township is located in the 1st Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 6th state legislative district.[8][40][41]

The seat for New Jersey's First Congressional District is currently vacant, having formerly been represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights), who resigned on February 18, 2014.[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[45][46]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 6th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James Beach (D, Voorhees Township) and in the General Assembly by Louis Greenwald (D, Voorhees Township) and Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D, Cherry Hill).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, its seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with wither two or three seats coming up for election each year.[50] As of 2014, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term ends December 31, 2014)[51], Freeholder Deputy Director Edward McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, 2016)[52], Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015)[53], Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015)[54], Scot N. McCray (Camden, 2014)[55], Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015)[56] and Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2016).[57][58][59] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk Joseph Ripa,[60] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham[61] and Surrogate Patricia Egan "Pat" Jones.[62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 10,876 registered voters in Haddon Township, of which 4,408 (40.5%) were registered as Democrats, 2,036 (18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 4,415 (40.6%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 17 voters registered to other parties.[63]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 59.7% of the vote here (5,185 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 37.4% (3,244 votes), with 8,685 ballots cast among the township's 10,887 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.8%.[64] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 58.7% of the vote here (5,021 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 39.8% (3,401 votes), with 8,549 ballots cast among the township's 10,762 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 79.4.[65]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 49.2% of the vote here (2,705 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 43.0% (2,365 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 5.9% (327 votes), with 5,498 ballots cast among the township's 10,864 registered voters, yielding a 50.6% turnout.[66]

Education[edit]

The Haddon Township School District serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[67]) are five elementary schools — Thomas A. Edison Elementary School[68] (grades PreK-5; 161 students), Clyde S. Jennings Elementary School[69] (K-5; 106), Stoy Elementary School[70] (PreK-5; 187), Strawbridge Elementary School[71] (K-5; 228), Van Sciver Elementary School[72] (PreK-5; 335) — William G. Rohrer Middle School[73] (6-8; 520) and Haddon Township High School[74] (9-12; 571).[75]

Prior to the establishment of Haddon Township High School in the 1960s, most Haddon Township students attended Collingswood High School; however, some attended Haddonfield Memorial High School or Audubon High School.[76]

Paul VI High School is a regional high school founded in September 1966 that operates under the oversight of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden with an enrollment of over 1,000 students.[77][78] Holy Saviour School was an elementary school that operated under the auspices of the Camden diocese until it closed in 2008.[79]

Transportation[edit]

Westmont, the downtown section of Haddon Township, has a PATCO Park-and-Ride station.[80]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between the township and Philadelphia on the 403 route, with local service available on the 450 and 451 routes.[81]

Points of interest[edit]

Newton Union Schoolhouse

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Haddon Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Municipal Clerk, Haddon Township. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 33.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Haddon, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Haddon township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Haddon township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Haddon Township, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Haddon Township, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  19. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 106. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  20. ^ "The Name 'Westmont'" by William B. Brahms, Haddon Township Historical Society Web Site. Accessed August 30, 2008
  21. ^ a b History, Saddler's Woods Conservation Association. Accessed October 17, 2007. Saddler willed the property to his wife and nine surviving children.
  22. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2010, WestJersey.org. December 6, 2010. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  24. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 279, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed October 14, 2013. "Haddon contained a population in 1870 of 1,926."
  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Haddon township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Haddon township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Haddon township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  33. ^ The Commission Form of Municipal Government, p. 53. Accessed August 10, 2007.
  34. ^ 1997 Mayors Hall of Fame, New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  35. ^ Mayor + Commissioners, Haddon Township. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  36. ^ History, Westmont Fire Company No. 1. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  37. ^ Government, Haddon Township. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  38. ^ Police Department, Haddon Township.
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  43. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 21, 2014.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  51. ^ Louis Cappelli, Jr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  52. ^ Edward McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder Michelle Gentek, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  54. ^ Ian K. Leonard, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  55. ^ Scot N. McCray, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  56. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  57. ^ Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  58. ^ Board of Freeholders, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  59. ^ 2014 County Data Sheet, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  60. ^ County Clerk, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  61. ^ Sheriff, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  62. ^ Surrogate's Court, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  63. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Camden, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  64. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  65. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  66. ^ 2009 Governor: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  67. ^ Data for the Haddon Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  68. ^ Thomas A. Edison Elementary School, Haddon Township School District. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  69. ^ Clyde S. Jennings Elementary School, Haddon Township School District. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  70. ^ Stoy Elementary School, Haddon Township School District. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  71. ^ Strawbridge Elementary School, Haddon Township School District. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  72. ^ Van Sciver Elementary School, Haddon Township School District. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  73. ^ William G. Rohrer Middle School, Haddon Township School District. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  74. ^ Haddon Township High School, Haddon Township School District. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  75. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Haddon Township School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  76. ^ Haddon Township Historical Society - Haddon Township High School.
  77. ^ History, Paul VI High School. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  78. ^ Camden County Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden. Accessed July 10, 2008.
  79. ^ Staff. "Students, parishioners have reason to mourn schools", Courier-Post, June 17, 2008. Accessed September 20, 2012. "Closing for good to merge with other Catholic elementary schools are Annunciation in Bellmawr, Blessed Sacrament in Margate, Holy Saviour in Westmont, Queen of Heaven in Cherry Hill, St. Agnes in Blackwood, St. Bridget in Glassboro, St. Lawrence in Lindenwold and Our Lady of Grace/Holy Rosary in Somerdale."
  80. ^ Westmont Station, Port Authority Transit Corporation. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  81. ^ Camden County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  82. ^ http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMHQNE_Newton_Union_Schoolhouse_Haddon_Township_NJ
  83. ^ NEW JERSEY - Camden County, National Register of Historic Places. Accessed February 25, 2008.
  84. ^ History, Saddler's Woods. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  85. ^ Rothschild, Barbara S. "Longtime rabbi dies at age 90", Courier-Post, February 12, 2008. Accessed March 24, 2011. "Lewis was an inspiration to Haddon Township native Mitch Albom, best-selling author of Tuesdays with Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven."
  86. ^ Staff. "Laurie Beechman", The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 10, 1998. Accessed March 24, 2011. "Laurie Beechman, 44, a diminutive singer and actress whose immense talent, energy and heart took her from the stage at Haddon Township High School all the way to Broadway, died Sunday of ovarian cancer at home in White Plains, N.Y.... Last year, Haddon Township made her the first inductee into the Haddon Township Cultural Hall of Fame."
  87. ^ Anastasia, Phil. "Haddon Twp. jockey closes in on 5,000th victory", Courier-Post, April 22, 2006. Accessed March 24, 2011. "Black, 54, a longtime Haddon Township resident, is nearing his 5,000th career victory as a jockey."
  88. ^ Staff. "George E. Brunner, Camden Ex-Mayor". The New York Times, February 9, 1975. Accessed March 24, 2011. "George E. Brunner, who was Mayor of Camden, N.J., from 1936 to 1959, died yesterday at his home in Haddon Township, N.J."
  89. ^ Frank, Martin. "Eagles prep for Ravens's no-huddle offense", Asbury Park Press, September 15, 2012. Accessed September 20, 2012. "QB Joe Flacco grew up in nearby Haddon Township and went to Delaware."
  90. ^ Kane, Larry (2001)Larry Kane's Philadelphia Philadelphia : Temple University Press. ISBN 1-56639-806-1; p. 12
  91. ^ Kane, Larry (2003) Ticket to Ride: Inside the Beatles' 1964 Tour That Changed the World New York : Penguin Books. ISBN 0-7624-1592-4
  92. ^ Staff. "Area residents help power MS City to Shore Bike tour", Courier-Post, September 20, 2001. Accessed March 24, 2011. "Kane, now of Abington, Pa., was briefly a South Jersey resident when he lived in Haddon Township as a young bachelor in the late 1960s."
  93. ^ a b c White-Grear, Sandra. The Whitall-Van Sciver House. Haddon Township Historical Society, presented December 18, 2004. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  94. ^ "THEATER; For Comedian, Old Jokes, Loyal Fans", The New York Times, October 19, 2006, Accessed August 24, 2010
  95. ^ Bracy, Aaron. "Staley's success is no surprise to Leslie", Courier-Post, March 18, 2005. Accessed March 21, 2011. "Sal Paolantonio, a Haddon Township resident, recently signed a four-year contract extension with ESPN."
  96. ^ Lavinia, DeCastro. "Haddon Township: Part of a larger whole", Courier-Post, October 19, 2006, Accessed March 24, 2011. "Did you know film director Steven Spielberg lived in Haddon Township as a youngster? Spielberg lived in the township from 1950 to 1953 and he is believed to have seen one of his first movies at the Westmont Theater."
  97. ^ Smith, Hannah Whitall. John M. Whitall: The Story of His Life, p. 27. Accessed October 14, 2013.
  98. ^ Staff. "Scott Cronick's Casino Action: Chef Gordon Ramsay makes the rounds in Atlantic City", The Press of Atlantic City, January 6, 2011. Accessed March 24, 2011. "Miss New Jersey Julianna White, of Haddon Township, was introduced to Frankie Valli after he appearance at Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa."

External links[edit]