Haglaz

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Name
Hagall
"hail"
Shape Elder Futhark Futhorc Younger Futhark
Runic letter haglaz.svg Runic letter haglaz variant.svg Runic letter ior.svg H rune short-twig.svg
Unicode ᚺ ᚻ
U+16BA U+16BB
U+16BC
U+16BD
Transliteration h
Transcription h
IPA [h]
Position in rune-row 9 7
Various forms of the haglaz rune in the elder futhark.

*Haglaz or *Hagalaz is the reconstructed Proto-Germanic name of the h-rune , meaning "hail" (the precipitation).

In the Anglo-Saxon futhorc, it is continued as hægl and in the Younger Futhark as hagall The corresponding Gothic letter is 𐌷 h h, named hagl.

The Elder Futhark letter has two variants, single-barred and double-barred . The double-barred variant is found in continental inscriptions while Scandinavian inscriptions have exclusively the single-barred variant.

The Anglo-Frisian futhorc in early inscriptions has the Scandinavian single-barred variant. From the 7th century, it is replaced by the continental double-barred variant, the first known instances being found on a Harlingen solidus (ca,. 575–625), and in the Christogram on St. Cuthbert's coffin.

Haglaz is recorded in all three rune poems:

Rune Poem:[1] English Translation:

Old Norwegian
Hagall er kaldastr korna;
Kristr skóp hæimenn forna.


Hail is the coldest of grain;
Christ created the world of old.

Old Icelandic
Hagall er kaldakorn
ok krapadrífa
ok snáka sótt.


Hail is cold grain
and shower of sleet
and sickness of serpents.

Anglo-Saxon
Hægl byþ hwitust corna;
hwyrft hit of heofones lyfte,
wealcaþ hit windes scura;
weorþeþ hit to wætere syððan.


Hail is the whitest of grain;
it is whirled from the vault of heaven
and is tossed about by gusts of wind
and then it melts into water.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Original poems and translation from the Rune Poem Page.