Hakea salicifolia

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Hakea salicifolia
Willow-leaved Hakea.jpg
Hakea salicifolia (Willow-leaved Hakea)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
Order: Proteales
Family: Proteaceae
Subfamily: Grevilleoideae
Genus: Hakea
Species: H. salicifolia
Binomial name
Hakea salicifolia
(Vent.) B.L.Burtt[1]

Hakea salicifolia (HAK-ee-uh sal-iss-ih-FOH-lee-uh) commonly known as the willow-leaved hakea,[1] is indigenous to Eastern Australia and is found in New South Wales and Queensland.

H. salicifolia is a fast-growing, upright shrub that can grow up to 5m tall. The flat and elliptical leaves are widest in the middle and can grow up to 12 cm long.[2] New growth on the Willow-leaved Hakea is rose coloured. During the spring the Willow-leaved Hakea has pale yellow to white flowers which appear in small dense clusters among the leaves.

Willow-leaved Hakea Seed Pods

Willow-leaved Hakea is an invasive plant species in New Zealand and is listed by the New Zealand Department of Conservation as one of about 300 environmental weeds.[3]

The species was formally described in 1890 by French botanist Étienne Pierre Ventenat, based on a specimen cultivated at the garden of Jacques Philippe Martin Cels which was believed to have origins in the Botany Bay area. Ventenat gave it the name Embrothium salicifolium.[4] English botanist Brian Burtt transferred the species to the genus Hakea in 1941.[1]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Hakea salicifolia (Vent.) B.L.Burtt". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government. Retrieved 9 May 2014. 
  2. ^ "Willow-leaved hakea". Bay of Plenty Regional Council. Retrieved 17 March 2013. 
  3. ^ Howell, Clayson (May 2008). Consolidated list of environmental weeds in New Zealand. DRDS292. Wellington: Department of Conservation. ISBN 978-0-478-14413-0. Retrieved 2013-01-15. 
  4. ^ "Embothrium salicifolium Vent.". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government. Retrieved 9 May 2014. 

External links[edit]