Hakin9

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hakin9: IT Security Magazine
Editor hakin9 team
Categories Computers, technology
Frequency Weekly
Publisher Hakin9 Media
First issue 2005
Country  Poland
Language Polish, English, French, German
Website www.hakin9.org/en
ISSN 1733-7186

Hakin9 is a Polish online, weekly publication on IT Security. The magazine also features some articles in English, German and French. A limited number of free articles are available on their web site. The full version of the magazine is available online to subscribers.

Hakin9 is a source of news and information about offensive hacking methods as well as ways of securing systems, networks and applications.

Hakin9 is published by Hakin9 Media Sp.z.o.o Sp Komandytowa, based in Poland.

History of publication[edit]

Hakin9's first edition was released in 2005, then after a few-month-long break the real editing process started in September 2006.

DICKS hoax[edit]

In August 2012, Hakin9 published an e-book entitled Nmap Guide, intended to be a guide to the Nmap network scanner software. The first chapter was entitled, "Nmap: The Internet Considered Harmful - DARPA Inference Checking Kludge Scanning", which forms the acronym "DICKS". The entire content of this chapter is a nonsensical hoax.[1] The chapter credited several authors, including Mark Dowd, who posted on Twitter that he had nothing to do with it.[2] Some of the authors, such as Matthieu Suiche, thanked the Pwnie Awards Jury for the award. [3]

The original author and current maintainer of Nmap, Gordon "Fyodor" Lyon, criticized Hakin9's editorial practices for accepting content he called "ridiculous", even to the title. Lyon speculated that the chapter had been generated by SCIgen (software for generating nonsense computer science papers).[4] Lyon initially obtained permission from Hakin9 to publish the chapter on the NMAP website, but once news of the hoax began to spread, Hakin9 sent Lyon a legal threat to remove it.[5]

Spamming practices[edit]

Hakin9 is known for spamming tactics used to get free articles. It's been doing this since abandoning paid subscribtion model. Several articles were written about their spamming actions [6][7] and a legal threats has been issued against people who wrote about it. [8]

Staff[edit]

  • Editor in Chief: Ewa Duranc
  • Editorial Advisory Board: Clement Dupuis, Matt Jonkman, Steve Lape, James Broad, Rebecca Wynn
  • Proofreaders: James Broad, Arsen Darakdjian, Jonathan Edwards, Henry Henderson

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Leyden (2012-10-05). "Experts troll 'biggest security mag in the world' with DICKish submission". The Register. Retrieved 2012-12-05. 
  2. ^ Mark Dowd (6:03 PM - 28 Sep 12). "Hrm, I actually didn't contribute to that hackin9 article.". Twitter. Retrieved 2012-12-05. 
  3. ^ Matt Suiche. "Proud to have contributed to the pwnie award attributed to Hakin9. #BlackHat cc: @endrazine @jonoberheide @nudehaberdasher @thegrugq @mdowd". Twitter. Retrieved 2013-08-01. 
  4. ^ Gordon "Fyodor" Lyon (Fri, 28 Sep 2012 13:05:25 -0700). "Re: Hakin9's new Nmap Guide". Nmap Development mailing list. Retrieved 2012-12-05. 
  5. ^ Gordon "Fyodor" Lyon (Wed, 3 Oct 2012 15:42:12 -0700). "Re: Hakin9's new Nmap Guide". Nmap Development mailing list. Retrieved 2012-12-05. 
  6. ^ Robin Wood (4 Oct 2012). "Hakin9 - Spam Kings". Hakin9 - Spam Kings. Retrieved 2012-10-04. 
  7. ^ unknown (5 Oct 2012). "Hakin9 Magazine & Their Spam Problem". Hakin9 Magazine & Their Spam Problem. Retrieved 2012-10-05. 
  8. ^ informantt (4 Oct 2012). "Hakin9 wants to sue polish blogger after he wrote about their spamming tactics". Hakin9 wants to sue polish blogger after he wrote about their spamming tactics. Retrieved 2012-10-04. 

External links[edit]