Blacklip abalone

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Haliotis rubra
Blacklip abalone.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Mollusca
Class: Gastropoda
(unranked): clade Vetigastropoda
Superfamily: Haliotoidea
Family: Haliotidae
Genus: Haliotis
Species: H. rubra
Binomial name
Haliotis rubra
W. E. Leach, 1814
Synonyms
  • Haliotis improbula Iredale, T., 1924
  • Haliotis (Haliotis) ancile Reeve, L.A., 1846
  • Haliotis (Haliotis) naevosa Philippi, R.A., 1844
  • Haliotis (Haliotis) tubifera Lamarck, J.B.P.A. de, 1822
  • Sanhaliotis whitehousei Colman, J.G., 1959

The blacklip abalone, Haliotis rubra, is a species of large, edible sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Haliotidae, the abalones.[1][2]

Two shells of Haliotis rubra
Subspecies
  • Haliotis rubra conicopora Péron, 1816 – the conical pore abalone; synonyms: Haliotis conicopora Péron, 1816 (original combination), Haliotis cunninghami Gray, 1826; Haliotis granti Pritchard & Gatliff, 1902; Haliotis vixlirata Cotton, 1943
  • Haliotis rubra rubra Leach, 1814 the shield abalone; synonyms: Haliotis ancile Reeve, 1846; Haliotis improbula Iredale, 1924; Haliotis naevosa Philippi, 1844; Haliotis ruber Leach, 1814 (original combination); Haliotis whitehousei (Colman, 1959); Sanhaliotis whitehousei Colman, 1959

Description[edit]

The size of the shell varies between 35 mm and 200 mm.

Distribution[edit]

This species is endemic to Australia, and is of one of the main species of abalone taken in South Australia and Tasmania[3] Range is from Fremantle, Western Australia, to Angourie, New South Wales, and around Tasmania[4]

It is called the blacklip abalone because the edge of the foot is black.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.seashellsofnsw.org.au/Haliotidae/Pages/haliotis_rubra.htm
  2. ^ Bouchet, P. (2012). Haliotis rubra Leach, 1814. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=445354 on 2013-02-04
  3. ^ "Fisheries - Abalone". Government of South Australia, Primary Industries and Regions SA. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  4. ^ Edgar, Graham J. (2008). Australian Marine Life: The plants and animals of temperate waters (Second ed.). Sydney: New Holland. ISBN 9781921517174. 
  • Geiger D.L. & Poppe G.T. (2000). A Conchological Iconography: The family Haliotidae. Conchbooks, Hackenheim Germany. 135pp 83pls
  • Geiger D.L. & Owen B. (2012) Abalone: Worldwide Haliotidae. Hackenheim: Conchbooks. viii + 361 pp.

External links[edit]