Hama Tuma

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Hama Tuma (born 1949) is an Ethiopian poet and writer in the Amharic and English languages.

Biography[edit]

Born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Tuma studied Law in Addis Ababa University. He became an advocate for democracy and justice. This has caused him to be banned by three different Ethiopian governments. This situation sharpened his use of satire and he is known as one of Ethiopia's greatest satirists. He has travelled widely but currently lives in Paris with his wife and daughter. His books have been translated into English, Italian, French, and Hebrew.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Why Don't They Eat Coltan? (Infinity Publishing, 2010)
  • Democratic Cannibalism: African Absurdities III (Infinity Publishing, 2007)
  • The Case of the Criminal Walk and Other Stories (Outskirts Press, May 2006)
  • Give Me a Dog's Life Any Day: African Absurdities II (essays; Trafford Publishing, 2004)
  • African Absurdities: Politically Incorrect Articles (essays; First Publish, 2002)
  • Case of the Socialist Witchdoctor and other stories (short stories; Heinemann, 1993)
  • Of Spades and Ethiopians (poetry; Free Ethiopian Press, 1991)
  • Eating an American and Other Poems (1995)
  • Habeshigna #1 & #2 (two collections of poetry in Amharic)
  • Kedada Chereka (novel)

External links[edit]

Sources[edit]

Gikandi, Simon. The Columbia Guide to East African literature in English since 1945, p. 169 (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007).