Hamburg, Iowa

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Hamburg, Iowa
City
The community on June 16, 2011 during the 2011 Missouri River floods after a levee protecting it was breached. A second levee was built and held
The community on June 16, 2011 during the 2011 Missouri River floods after a levee protecting it was breached. A second levee was built and held
Location of Hamburg, Iowa
Location of Hamburg, Iowa
Coordinates: 40°36′21″N 95°39′18″W / 40.60583°N 95.65500°W / 40.60583; -95.65500Coordinates: 40°36′21″N 95°39′18″W / 40.60583°N 95.65500°W / 40.60583; -95.65500
Country  United States
State  Iowa
County Fremont
Area[1]
 • Total 1.10 sq mi (2.85 km2)
 • Land 1.10 sq mi (2.85 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 919 ft (280 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 1,187
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 1,137
 • Density 1,079.1/sq mi (416.6/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 51640
Area code(s) 712
FIPS code 19-33780
GNIS feature ID 0457215

Hamburg is the most southwestern city in Iowa hugging the borders of Missouri to the south and Nebraska to the west. It derives its name from the German city of Hamburg. It is the corporate headquarters of Vogel Popcorn which claims to be the source of 52 percent of the popcorn grown in the United States.[4]

It is located in Fremont County, Iowa, United States, and is situated between the Nishnabotna River and the Missouri River. The population was 1,187 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

The city is less than a quarter mile from the Missouri state line. The first settlers in the community were people who actually thought they were settling in Missouri following the Platte Purchase of former Indian territory there across the state line opened up settlement. The first formal settlement in the Hamburg vicinity were by the brothers James McKissick, Cornelius McKissick, Daniel McKissick who established McKissick's Grove. A survey was made when Iowa entered the union in 1846, and only then did the settlers discover that they were in Iowa and not Missouri.[5]

The brothers were also involved in another border irregularity when they bought McKissick Island a mile south of Hamburg. They thought at the time the island in the Missouri River was attached to Nebraska territory. The river changed course in 1867 resulting in the island becoming physically attached by dry land to Missouri and cut off from Nebraska by the main channel. Missouri and Nebraska both claimed the island and it was decided in 1904 by the U.S. Supreme Court that it belonged to Nebraska, although the states did not formally agree to the arrangement until 1999. In the meantime students from the Nebraska island passed through Missouri en route to being educated in Hamburg in Iowa.[5][6]

Hamburg was formally laid out in 1857 at the behest of Augustus Borchers (August Heinrich B., August 26, 1817, Harburg near Hamburg, Germany - November 23, 1885, Hamburg (Ia.))[7] who named for the German city and was formally incorporated on April 1, 1867 at about the same time as it was reached by the Council Bluffs and St. Joseph Railroad. A second railroad Nebraska City Branch of the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad (which came from Red Oak, Iowa) came through in 1870.[5]

Alex and Arthur Vogel started Vogel and Son Popcorn Company in 1948. The company grew to the point where he bought the city's old water tower and train station to store his popcorn - the two structures hold a million pounds of popcorn. In 1960 the city started its Popcorn Days festival (replacing an earlier named peony festival). Vogel Popcorn is now owned by ConAgra Foods but remains headquartered in the city. Its popcorn is used in Act II and Orville Redenbacher's.[8]

The city gets considerable publicity during periods of Missouri River flooding, including most recently the 2011 Missouri River Flood.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.10 square miles (2.85 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
Year Pop. ±%
1860 167 —    
1870 1,431 +756.9%
1880 2,036 +42.3%
1890 1,634 −19.7%
1900 2,079 +27.2%
1910 1,817 −12.6%
1920 2,017 +11.0%
1930 2,103 +4.3%
1940 2,187 +4.0%
1950 2,086 −4.6%
1960 1,647 −21.0%
1970 1,649 +0.1%
1980 1,597 −3.2%
1990 1,248 −21.9%
2000 1,240 −0.6%
2010 1,187 −4.3%
Source:"American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau.  and Iowa Data Center

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,187 people, 514 households, and 312 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,079.1 inhabitants per square mile (416.6 /km2). There were 594 housing units at an average density of 540.0 per square mile (208.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.2% White, 0.8% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.7% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.2% of the population.

There were 514 households of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.8% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.3% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.88.

The median age in the city was 41 years. 23.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20.5% were from 25 to 44; 26.3% were from 45 to 64; and 19.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.1% male and 49.9% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 1,240 people, 544 households, and 343 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,107.1 people per square mile (427.5/km2). There were 604 housing units at an average density of 539.3 per square mile (208.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.21% White, 0.08% African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 2.66% from other races, and 0.48% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.48% of the population.

There were 544 households out of which 27.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.1% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.8% were non-families. 32.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.83.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.9% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 24.7% from 25 to 44, 24.3% from 45 to 64, and 21.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,479, and the median income for a family was $42,935. Males had a median income of $28,162 versus $20,781 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,050. About 11.7% of families and 13.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.3% of those under age 18 and 11.0% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-23. 
  4. ^ "The Vogel Story". Vogel Popcorn. Retrieved 2013-04-02. 
  5. ^ a b c "Fremont County, Iowa history from Andreas' Atlas of Iowa 1875". Iagenweb.org. Retrieved 2013-04-02. 
  6. ^ "History of Communities: Nemaha Co. NEGenWeb". Rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved 2013-04-02. 
  7. ^ Ernst August Borchers: Borchers aus Goslar 1400-2000 - A Family's History
  8. ^ Enke, Phil (2010-09-14). "Art Vogel honored for sparking celebration - News - Hamburg Reporter - Hamburg, IA". Hamburg Reporter. Retrieved 2013-04-02. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]