Hamilton Mountain

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For the provincial electoral district, see Hamilton Mountain (provincial electoral district).
Hamilton Mountain
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario electoral district
Hamilton Mountain.png
Hamilton Mountain in relation to the other Hamilton area ridings
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Chris Charlton
New Democratic
District created 1966
First contested 1968
Last contested 2011
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1] 125,586
Electors (2011) 88,620
Area (km²)[2] 42.32
Pop. density (per km²) 2,967.5
Census divisions Hamilton
Census subdivisions Hamilton
For information on the Hamilton Mountain geographical feature, see the articles on the Niagara Escarpment or Hamilton, Ontario.

Hamilton Mountain is a federal electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968. The riding is located in the Hamilton, Ontario region.

The socio-economic composition of the Hamilton Mountain is diverse, having low-income public housing residents as well as million dollar estates, highly paid unionized workers and small-wage unskilled workers, and well-established families and recent immigrants.

This diversity makes Hamilton Mountain a swing riding where many elections are virtually two- or three-way ties. For instance, in 1988 less than a hundred votes separated the first and second place finishers and in the 2004 election only three thousand votes separated the first and third place finishers. In recent years, however, the riding has been one of the more left-leaning ones in Hamilton. A centre-right MP hasn't won here since 1980. Since the 1990s it has usually been a two-way race between the Liberals and NDP. The Conservatives have only seriously contended once here since their formation, in the 2004 election--the only time since 1993 that a centre-right party has won more than 20 percent of the vote.

Geography[edit]

In 2003, the riding was redefined to consist of the part of the City of Hamilton bounded by a line drawn west from the Niagara Escarpment along Red Hill Creek, south along Mountain Brow Boulevard, Arbour Road and Glover Road, west along the hydroelectric transmission line situated south of Rymal Road East, north along Glancaster Road, east along Garner Road East, north along the hydroelectric transmission line situated west of Upper Paradise Road, east along Lincoln M. Alexander Parkway, north along West 5th Street, northeast along James Mountain Road, and east and south along the Niagara Escarpment to the point of commencement.

History[edit]

The riding was created in 1966 from parts of Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Aldershot, Hamilton South, Hamilton West, Stoney Creek, and Wentworth ridings.

It consisted initially of:

  • the part of the City of Hamilton east of a line drawn west along Mud Street, north along Mountain Brow Boulevard, and northwest along the brow of the Mountain; and
  • the part of the Township of Glanford in the County of Wentworth lying north of County Suburban Road No. 22.

In 1976, it was redefined to consist of the part of the City of Hamilton lying south of the brow of the Mountain bounded on the east by Red Hill Creek, on the west by the west limit of the city, and on the south by Mohawk Road, Limeridge Road, and Mountain Brow Boulevard.

In 1987, it was redefined to consist of the part of the City of Hamilton lying south of the brow of the Mountain bounded by a line drawn from Mountain Brow Boulevard, west along Limeridge Road to St. Jerome School, west to Garth Street, south along Garth Street, west along the proposed Mountain Freeway.

In 1996, it was redefined to consist of the part of the City of Hamilton south of a line drawn north from the western city limit near Lisajane Court, east along Stone Church Road, north along Garth Street, east along Redhill Creek Expressway, north along West 5 Street, then east along the brow of the Niagara Escarpment to the eastern city limit.

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Hamilton Mountain
Riding created from Hamilton South and Hamilton West
28th  1968 − 1972     Gordon J. Sullivan Liberal
29th  1972 − 1974     Duncan Beattie Progressive Conservative
30th  1974 − 1979     Gus MacFarlane Liberal
31st  1979 − 1980     Duncan Beattie Progressive Conservative
32nd  1980 − 1984     Ian Deans New Democratic
33rd  1984 − 1986
 1987 − 1988     Marion Dewar New Democratic
34th  1988 − 1993     Beth Phinney Liberal
35th  1993 − 1997
36th  1997 − 2000
37th  2000 − 2004
38th  2004 − 2006
39th  2006 − 2008     Chris Charlton New Democratic
40th  2008 − 2011
41st  2011 − Present

Election results[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
New Democratic Chris Charlton 25,595 47.2 +3.5
Conservative Terry Anderson 17,936 33.1 +2.4
Liberal Marie Bountrogianni 8,787 16.2 -4
Green Stephen Brotherson 1,505 2.8 -2.7
Christian Heritage Jim Enos 270 0.5
Independent Henryk Adamiec 171 0.3
Total valid votes 54,264 100.0
Total rejected ballots 261 0.5 +0.4
Turnout 54,525 61.8
Eligible voters 88,196
Source: Elections Canada.[3]
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
New Democratic Chris Charlton 22,796 43.7 +6.3 $79,793
Conservative Terry Anderson 16,010 30.7 +3.5 $58,663
Liberal Tyler Banham 10,531 20.2 -11.7 $78,883
Green Stephen Brotherston 2,884 5.5 +2.9 $7,683
Total valid votes/Expense limit 52,221 100.0 $91,117
Total rejected ballots 293 0.1
Turnout 52,514
Source: Elections Canada.[3]
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
New Democratic Chris Charlton 21,869 37.3 +4.4
Liberal Bill Kelly 18,697 31.9 -2.9
Conservative Don Graves 15,915 27.2 -2.1
Green Susan Wadsworth 1,510 2.6 0.0
Christian Heritage Stephen Downey 458 0.8
Marxist–Leninist Paul Lane 131 0.2 -0.2
Total valid votes 58,580 100.0
Source: Elections Canada.[3]
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Beth Phinney 18,548 34.8 -16.1
New Democratic Chris Charlton 17,552 32.9 +23.0
Conservative Tom Jackson 15,590 29.3 -9.3
Green Jo Pavlov 1,378 2.6
Marxist–Leninist Paul Lane 214 0.4 -0.2
Total valid votes 53,282 100.0
Source: Elections Canada.[3]

Note: Conservative vote is compared to the total of the Canadian Alliance vote and Progressive Conservative vote in 2000 election.

Canadian federal election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Beth Phinney 22,536 50.9 +5.1
Alliance Mike Scott 9,621 21.7 +4.1
Progressive Conservative John Smith 7,467 16.9 -2.4
New Democratic James Stephenson 4,387 9.9 -6.2
Marxist–Leninist Rolf Gerstenberger 259 0.6 +0.3
Total valid votes 44,270 100.0

Note: Canadian Alliance vote is compared to the Reform vote in 1997 election.

Canadian federal election, 1997
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Beth Phinney 21,128 45.8 -11.3
Progressive Conservative John Smith 8,877 19.2 +7.8
Reform Richard F. Gaasenbeek 8,154 17.7 -3.9
New Democratic Chris Charlton 7,440 16.1 8.4
Canadian Action Christopher M. Patty 374 0.8
Marxist–Leninist Iqbal Sumbal 146 0.3
Total valid votes 46,119 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Beth Phinney 27,218 57.1 +24.2
Reform Craig Chandler 10,297 21.6
Progressive Conservative Tamra Mann 5,474 11.5 -19.0
New Democratic Andrew MacKenzie 3,670 7.7 -25.1
National Gunter Hinz 673 1.4
Natural Law Isabel Millman 331 0.7
Total valid votes 47,663 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1988
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Beth Phinney 16,934 32.9 -5.9
New Democratic Marion Dewar 16,861 32.8 -10.6
Progressive Conservative Grant Darby 15,712 30.5 +14.6
Christian Heritage Charles Eleveld 1,799 3.5
Commonwealth of Canada Ed Gardner 87 0.2
Independent Rolf Gerstenberger 70 0.1
Total valid votes 51,463 100.0
Canadian federal by-election, 20 July 1987
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Resignation of Ian Deans, 31 August 1986
New Democratic Marion Dewar 14,435 43.4 -5.8
Liberal Beth Phinney 12,903 38.8 +20.6
Progressive Conservative Dan MacDonald 5,301 15.9 -16.5
Rhinoceros Martin O'Hanlon 316 0.9
Independent John Turmel 166 0.5
Social Credit Andrew Varady 149 0.4
Total valid votes 33,270 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1984
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
New Democratic Ian Deans 25,789 49.2 +13.7
Progressive Conservative Duncan M. Beattie 17,004 32.4 -0.1
Liberal Jerry McCullough 9,514 18.1 -13.7
Commonwealth of Canada Mike McGee 133 0.3
Total valid votes 52,440 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1980
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
New Democratic Ian Deans 17,700 35.5 +11.5
Progressive Conservative Duncan M. Beattie 16,208 32.5 -9.3
Liberal Gus MacFarlane 15,873 31.8 -2.1
Communist Elizabeth Rowley 65 0.1
Marxist–Leninist Gerard Kimmons 57 0.1 0.0
Total valid votes 49,903 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1979
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Duncan M. Beattie 21,348 41.2 +6.4
Liberal Gus MacFarlane 17,334 33.9 -10.0
New Democratic Andy Asselin 12,273 24.0 +3.7
Communist Elizabeth Rowley 102 0.2 -0.1
Marxist–Leninist Gerard Kimmons 68 0.1 0.0
Total valid votes 51,125 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1974
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Gus MacFarlane 22,253 43.9 +10.9
Progressive Conservative Duncan M. Beattie 17,922 35.3 -5.6
New Democratic Don Gray 10,304 20.3 -5.4
Communist Nancy McDonald 170 0.3
Marxist–Leninist Dawn Carroll 69 0.1
Total valid votes 50,718 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1972
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Duncan M. Beattie 21,713 41.0 +16.5
Liberal Harvey Lanctot 17,477 33.0 -8.2
New Democratic Bill Nichols 13,604 25.7 -8.7
Social Credit Roger Hamelin 183 0.3
Total valid votes 52,977 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1968
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal Gordon J. Sullivan 17,794 41.2
New Democratic William D. Howe 14,838 34.3
Progressive Conservative Duncan Beattie 10,583 24.5
Total valid votes 43,215 100.0

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Stastistics Canada: 2012
  2. ^ Stastistics Canada: 2012
  3. ^ a b c d "Past results: Hamilton Mountain (Ontario), 2004-present". Elections Canada. Retrieved 2012-10-21.