Hamilton Township, Atlantic County, New Jersey

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Not to be confused with Hamilton Township, Mercer County, New Jersey.
Hamilton Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Hamilton
Motto: "New Jersey's Largest Municipality"
Map of Hamilton Township in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Hamilton Township in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hamilton Township, Atlantic County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hamilton Township, Atlantic County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°28′55″N 74°44′15″W / 39.481949°N 74.737379°W / 39.481949; -74.737379Coordinates: 39°28′55″N 74°44′15″W / 39.481949°N 74.737379°W / 39.481949; -74.737379[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Atlantic
Incorporated February 5, 1813
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Roger J. Silva (term ends December 31, 2014)[3][4]
 • Clerk Joan I. Anderson[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 113.066 sq mi (292.841 km2)
 • Land 111.127 sq mi (287.818 km2)
 • Water 1.939 sq mi (5.023 km2)  1.72%
Area rank 2nd of 566 in state
2nd of 23 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 30 ft (9 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 26,503
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 26,752
 • Rank 92nd of 566 in state
4th of 23 in county[12]
 • Density 238.5/sq mi (92.1/km2)
 • Density rank 494th of 566 in state
16th of 23 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP Code 08330 - Mays Landing[13][14]
Area code(s) 609[15]
FIPS code 3400129280[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882049[1][18]
Website www.townshipofhamilton.com

Hamilton Township is a township in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 26,503,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 6,004 (+29.3%) from the 20,499 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,487 (+28.0%) from the 16,012 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] The Township of Hamilton was incorporated by the New Jersey Legislature on February 5, 1813.[20][21]

The township calls itself "New Jersey's Largest Municipality" on its stationery and its website. At 111.127 square miles (287.82 km2), Hamilton Township has the largest land area of any municipality in New Jersey.[22] However, with a total area of 113.066 square miles (292.84 km2) it is the second-largest municipality in New Jersey in terms of total area, more than 2.1 square miles (5.4 km2) smaller than neighboring Galloway Township, which has a total area of 115.213 square miles (298.40 km2).[1][23]

Mays Landing (with a Census 2010 population of 2,135[24]) is a census-designated place located within Hamilton Township[1][20][25] that has been the county seat of Atlantic County since 1837.[26][27]

History[edit]

Hamilton Township's origins are directly tied to the Great Egg Harbor River and its tributaries which run through it. George May, after whom the village of Mays Landing was named, built a shipyard and trading post near Babcock Creek in 1756. By the mid 19th century, Mays Landing reached the height of its shipbuilding.

From 1830 to 1880, more than 200 vessels were built along the Great Egg Harbor River with lumber from native forests and iron from Weymouth foundries. Half of them were produced at Mays Landing. But by the end of century, wood shipbuilding began to disappear due to the lack of suitable timber. Iron was then substituted for hull construction.

Hamilton was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 5, 1813, from portions of Egg Harbor Township and Weymouth Township, while the area was still part of Gloucester County. Hamilton became part of the newly created Atlantic County in 1837. Portions of the township were taken to form Hammonton on March 5, 1866, and to form Buena Vista Township on March 5, 1867.[21]

Geography[edit]

Hamilton Township is located at 39°28′55″N 74°44′15″W / 39.481949°N 74.737379°W / 39.481949; -74.737379 (39.481949,-74.737379). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 113.066 square miles (292.841 km2), of which, 111.127 square miles (287.818 km2) of it was land and 1.939 square miles (5.023 km2) of it (1.72%) was water.[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names in the township include Mays Landing, the county seat of Atlantic County, as well as Bears Head, Carmantown, Catawba, Clarktown, Cologne, Dacosta, Emmelsville, Gravelly Run, Lake Lenape, Laureldale, McKee City, Mizpah, Reega, Thompsontown, Weymouth and Wilsons Landing.[28][29]

Pinelands Reserve[edit]

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[30] Part of the township is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Atlantic County, along with areas in Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[31]

The western three-quarters of the township is governed by regulation by the New Jersey Pinelands Commission, which places major limitations on development in that portion of the township, which remains as pine forest with a distinctly rural character, with other portions designated as a Rural Development Area.[32] Significant portions of the eastern quarter of the township are designated by the Pinelands Commission as part of the Regional Growth Area (RGA), in which development is "allowed and encouraged" in the area surrounding Atlantic City, New Jersey.[33] The majority of the township's residents live in the area covered by the RGA, which has been developed in suburban fashion and includes shopping areas such as the Hamilton Mall, part of the township's 3,000,000 square feet (280,000 m2) of first class commercial retail properties.[20][34]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1820 877
1830 1,424 62.4%
1840 1,565 9.9%
1850 2,015 28.8%
1860 1,945 −3.5%
1870 1,271 * −34.7%
1880 1,464 15.2%
1890 1,512 3.3%
1900 1,682 11.2%
1910 2,271 35.0%
1920 2,406 5.9%
1930 3,193 32.7%
1940 3,363 5.3%
1950 3,774 12.2%
1960 6,017 59.4%
1970 6,445 7.1%
1980 9,499 47.4%
1990 16,012 68.6%
2000 20,499 28.0%
2010 26,503 29.3%
Est. 2013 26,752 [11][35] 0.9%
Population sources:
1820-1920[36] 1820-1830[37]
1840-2000[38] 1840[39] 1850-1870[40]
1850[41] 1870[42] 1880-1890[43]
1890-1910[44] 1910-1930[45]
1930-1990[46] 2000[47][48] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[21]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 26,503 people, 9,490 households, and 6,690 families residing in the township. The population density was 238.5 per square mile (92.1/km2). There were 10,196 housing units at an average density of 91.8 per square mile (35.4/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 67.96% (18,011) White, 18.55% (4,916) Black or African American, 0.26% (68) Native American, 5.41% (1,435) Asian, 0.06% (16) Pacific Islander, 4.12% (1,092) from other races, and 3.64% (965) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 12.79% (3,390) of the population.[8]

There were 9,490 households, of which 32.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.1% were married couples living together, 16.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.5% were non-families. 22.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.15.[8]

In the township, 24.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 27.6% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.1 years. For every 100 females there were 98.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.0 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $59,085 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,242) and the median family income was $62,354 (+/- $3,893). Males had a median income of $47,110 (+/- $4,411) versus $36,615 (+/- $3,549) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,292 (+/- $1,528). About 8.4% of families and 10.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.1% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.[49]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 20,499 people, 7,148 households, and 5,039 families residing in the township. The population density was 184.2 people per square mile (71.1/km²). There were 7,567 housing units at an average density of 68.0 per square mile (26.3/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 71.45% White, 19.26% African American, 0.29% Native American, 3.29% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 3.33% from other races, and 2.33% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.91% of the population.[47][48]

There were 7,148 households out of which 37.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.5% were married couples living together, 15.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.5% were non-families. 22.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.21.[47][48]

In the township the population was spread out with 27.1% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 35.9% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 8.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 99.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.7 males.[47][48]

The median income for a household in the township was $50,259, and the median income for a family was $54,899. Males had a median income of $37,419 versus $30,089 for females. The per capita income for the township was $21,309. About 4.5% of families and 6.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.1% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.[47][48]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Township of Hamilton is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government by a five-member Township Committee. Members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms in office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6] At an annual reorganization meeting each January, the Council selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2014, the members of the Hamilton Township Committee are Mayor Roger J. Silva (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2016; term as mayor ends 2014), Deputy Mayor Amy L. Gatto (R, term on committee ends 2016; term as mayor ends 2014), Aline L. Dix (R, 2014), Rodney Guishard (D, 2015) and Judith Y. Link (D, 2015).[3][50][51][52][53][54]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hamilton Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[55] and is part of New Jersey's 2nd state legislative district.[9][56][57]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[58] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[59][60] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[61][62]

The 2nd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jim Whelan (D, Atlantic City) and in the General Assembly by Chris A. Brown (R, Ventnor City) and John F. Amodeo (D, Northfield).[63] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[64] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[65]

Atlantic County is governed by a directly elected executive and a nine-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, responsible for legislation. The executive serves a four-year term and the freeholders are elected to staggered three-year terms, of which four are elected from the county on an at-large basis and five of the freeholders represent equally populated districts.[66][67] As of 2014, Atlantic County's Executive is Republican Dennis Levinson, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[68] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are Chairman Frank D. Formica, Freeholder District 2, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Linwood, Longport, Margate, Northfield, Somers Point and Ventnor (R, 2015),[69] Vice Chairman John W. Risley, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2014),[70] Colin G. Bell, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2015),[71] James A. Bertino, Freeholder District 5, including Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth (R, 2015),[72] Ernest D. Coursey, Freeholder District 1, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville (R, 2016),[73] Richard Dase, Freeholder District 4, including Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic (D, 2016),[74] Alexander C. Marino, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2014),[75] Will Pauls, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2016)[76] and Frank Sutton, Freeholder District 3, including Egg Harbor Township (part) and Hamilton Township (part) (R, 2014).[77][78][79] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Edward P. McGettigan (2016),[80] Sheriff Frank X. Balles (2014)[81] and Surrogate James Curcio (2015).[82][83]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 15,486 registered voters in Hamilton Township, of which 4,305 (27.8% vs. 30.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 3,541 (22.9% vs. 25.2%) were registered as Republicans and 7,635 (49.3% vs. 44.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[84] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 58.4% (vs. 58.8% in Atlantic County) were registered to vote, including 76.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 76.6% countywide).[84][85]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 6,748 votes here (59.9% vs. 57.9% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 4,334 votes (38.5% vs. 41.1%) and other candidates with 130 votes (1.2% vs. 0.9%), among the 11,268 ballots cast by the township's 16,710 registered voters, for a turnout of 67.4% (vs. 65.8% in Atlantic County).[86][87] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 6,619 votes here (57.7% vs. 56.5% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 4,612 votes (40.2% vs. 41.6%) and other candidates with 148 votes (1.3% vs. 1.1%), among the 11,481 ballots cast by the township's 16,199 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.9% (vs. 68.1% in Atlantic County).[88] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 5,055 votes here (51.9% vs. 52.0% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 4,507 votes (46.2% vs. 46.2%) and other candidates with 83 votes (0.9% vs. 0.8%), among the 9,747 ballots cast by the township's 13,128 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.2% (vs. 69.8% in the whole county).[89]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 4,086 votes here (59.0% vs. 60.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 2,526 votes (36.5% vs. 34.9%) and other candidates with 127 votes (1.8% vs. 1.3%), among the 6,924 ballots cast by the township's 17,080 registered voters, yielding a 40.5% turnout (vs. 41.5% in the county).[90][91] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 3,346 votes here (47.9% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 3,102 votes (44.4% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 386 votes (5.5% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 93 votes (1.3% vs. 1.2%), among the 6,983 ballots cast by the township's 15,764 registered voters, yielding a 44.3% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[92]

Education[edit]

For pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade, public school students attend the Hamilton Township Schools. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 3,156 students and 259.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.16:1.[93] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[94]) are Joseph C. Shaner Memorial School[95] with 621 students in Pre-K to 1st grade, George Hess Educational Complex[96] with 1,529 in grades 2 - 5 and William Davies Middle School[97] with 1,006 students in grades 6 - 8.[98]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Oakcrest High School, located in Hamilton Township, which serves students from Hamilton Township.[99] The high school is part of the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District, a regional high school district serving students at the district's two other schools, Absegami High School and Cedar Creek High School, from the other constituent districts of Egg Harbor City, Galloway Township and Mullica Township, together with students from the City of Port Republic and Washington Township (in Burlington County), who attend as part of sending/receiving relationships with their respective school districts.[100]

The Atlantic County Institute of Technology, established in 1974 and located on a campus covering 58 acres (23 ha), provides vocational instruction to high school students and adults from across Atlantic County, and was one of eight schools in the state recognized in 2008 as a National Blue Ribbon School by the United States Department of Education.[101] Township public school students are also eligible to attend Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.[102]

Saint Vincent de Paul Regional School is a Catholic elementary school in Mays Landing, serving students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade since 1961 and operated under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Camden.[103][104]

Atlantic Cape Community College was the second community college to be established in New Jersey, and moved to its campus in Mays Landing in February 1968 where it now serves students from both Atlantic County and Cape May County.[105]

Transportation[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 258.55 miles (416.10 km) of roadways, of which 171.15 miles (275.44 km) were maintained by the municipality, 40.49 miles (65.16 km) by Atlantic County, 32.91 miles (52.96 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 14.00 miles (22.53 km) by the South Jersey Transportation Authority.[106]

A variety of roads pass through the township. Hamilton hosts a 14-mile (23 km) stretch of the Atlantic City Expressway with three interchanges and the Egg Harbor Tolls. U.S. Route 40, U.S. Route 322 pass through as well as Route 50. The major county roads include County Route 552, County Route 559, County Route 563 and County Route 575.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service in the township between Cape May and Philadelphia on the 315 route and to Atlantic City on routes 502 (from Atlantic Cape Community College) and 553 (from Upper Deerfield Township).[107][108]

Points of interest[edit]

Hamilton is home to over 3,000,000 square feet (280,000 m2) of first-class retail establishments including Hamilton Mall, Consumer Square and Hamilton Commons. The Great Egg Harbor River and Lake Lenape are recreational resources used by local residents and visitors alike. Hamilton is also home to the Atlantic County Justice Facility, the County Court Complex and the main branch of the Atlantic County Library.

Wineries[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hamilton Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Governing Body, Township of Hamilton. Accessed November 28, 2014.
  4. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  5. ^ Municipal Governments in Atlantic County, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed June 28, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 13.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Hamilton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hamilton township, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2011.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hamilton township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 11, 2011.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
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  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Mays Landing, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 10, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Mays Landing, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 10, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 28, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 28, 2012.
  20. ^ a b c A Brief Overview of our Town, Hamilton Township. Accessed October 2, 2006.
  21. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 69. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  22. ^ New Jersey: Basic Information, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  23. ^ Barlas, Thomas. "Step aside, Hamilton twp.: Galloway is bigger / 'Largest' N.J. town a little smaller than neighbor, data show", The Press of Atlantic City, July 9, 2007. Accessed November 18, 2013. "Take Atlantic County's Hamilton Township, which for years has hailed itself on stationary and signs as "New Jersey's Largest Municipality.... But Hamilton Township residents might want to take another look at the numbers before becoming too smug with its bigness: The federal government says neighboring Galloway Township is actually larger."
  24. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Mays Landing CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 28, 2012
  25. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 12, 2012.
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  33. ^ Comprehensive Management Plan, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed December 11, 2011.
  34. ^ Map of Hamilton Township, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed December 11, 2011.
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  60. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  61. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  67. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Accessed September 14, 2014.
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  87. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  88. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  89. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  90. ^ 2013 Governor: Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, January 29, 2014. Accessed December 24, 2014.
  91. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 5, 2013 General Election Results : Atlantic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, January 29, 2014. Accessed December 24, 2014.
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  100. ^ Greater Egg Harbor Regional School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 28, 2014. "The Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District serves the communities of Galloway Township, Hamilton Township, Egg Harbor City, Mullica Township and participates in receiving relationships with Port Republic and Washington Township."
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  102. ^ Profile, Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  103. ^ Brochure, Saint Vincent de Paul Regional School. Accessed September 10, 2013.
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  108. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 18, 2013.
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  113. ^ Finding-aid for the Walter Lowenfels Papers (MSS074), Washington University in St. Louis. Accessed November 18, 2013. "Walter Lowenfels, poet, editor, translator, was born in New York, is married to the former Lillian Apotheker, who has collaborated with him and with Nan Braymer in this and other anthologies of poetry. He lives now in Mays Landing, New York, from where his correspondence, and much of the business material of this anthology emanated, roughly from February, 1966 - Oct., 1967, shortly after which the anthology was published by Doubleday."
  114. ^ Staff. "Lineman Arrested Following Bar Fight", The State (newspaper), March 25, 2006. Accessed November 18, 2013. "McKeen, a freshman from Mays Landing, N.J., was released Friday from the Richland County jail on a personal-recognizance bond, according to a jail spokesperson."
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  116. ^ Simpson, David. "Mays Landing author feels equally at home in Europe of Middle Ages", The Press of Atlantic City, October 26, 2011. Accessed September 20, 2012. "When Sharon Kay Penman, of Mays Landing, speaks of completing a novel, she sounds like one of her characters: a medieval warrior."
  117. ^ Obituary. "GRACIELA RIVERA ZUMCHAK", The Press of Atlantic City, July 20, 2011. Accessed September 20, 2012. "ZUMCHAK, GRACIELA RIVERA 90 - of Mays Landing went home to be with her Lord and Savior on Sunday, July 17, 2011."

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