Hammons Field

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Hammons Field
Hammons Field
Full name John Q. Hammons Field
Location 955 East Trafficway
Springfield, MO 65802-3671
(417) 863-0395
Coordinates 37°12′40″N 93°16′47″W / 37.21111°N 93.27972°W / 37.21111; -93.27972Coordinates: 37°12′40″N 93°16′47″W / 37.21111°N 93.27972°W / 37.21111; -93.27972
Broke ground July 17, 2002[1]
Opened April 2, 2004[2]
Owner John Q. Hammons Industries
Operator John Q. Hammons Industries
Surface Grass
Construction cost $32 million
($40 million in 2014 dollars[3])
Architect CDFM2
Pellham-Phillips-Hagerman
Structural engineer Wells & Scaletty[4]
General contractor Killian Construction Co.
Capacity 7,986 seats plus 2,500 general admission[5]
Field size Left Field: 315 feet (96.0 m)
Left-Center: 365 feet (111.3 m)
Center Field: 400 feet (122.0 m)
Right-Center: 365 feet (111.3 m)
Right Field: 330 feet (100.6 m)
Tenants
Springfield Cardinals (2005–present)
Missouri State Bears (2004–present)
Missouri Valley Conference Baseball Tournament (2004, 2007, 2012)

Hammons Field is a minor league ballpark in downtown Springfield, Missouri, with a capacity of 7,986 plus approximately 2,500 general admission seating. The facility, funded entirely by local businessman, hotel mogul and benefactor John Q. Hammons, is the centerpiece of the midtown development project, Jordan Valley Park, on the corner of Sherman Avenue and Trafficway Boulevard. Completed in April 2004, it is home to the Springfield Cardinals, the Double-A Texas League affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals as well as the Missouri State University Bears.

Hammons built the ballpark before he had a minor league team secured to play in the stadium, though he steadfastly assured local residents it would be the Double-A affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals. He was ultimately able to persuade the Cardinals to purchase the El Paso Diablos franchise of the Texas League from the Brett Bros. and relocate it to Springfield. They became the Springfield Cardinals soon thereafter when the parent club ended its brief two-year affiliation with the Tennessee Smokies of the Southern League.

Features[edit]

The stadium is unique due to its baseball specific outbuildings. The stadium currently has two large buildings just outside of the right-field walls. The larger of the two serves as a fully furnished indoor practice facility complete with astroturf, batting cages, and a small diamond for drills. The smaller building serves as administration, including General Manager offices, as well as housing both home teams' clubhouses, a cardio workout facility, and the physical trainer's office.

The stadium is also furnished with 28 luxury box suites. Twenty five suites are on the luxury box suite level which also houses a VIP Lounge and an executive kitchen. These suites feature a bar area with a mini-fridge as well as a balcony area with up to 12 stadium seats with personal speakers. The remaining three suites are on the Press Box level. These suites are all penthouse style suites and are considerably larger than their lower counterparts. Instead of featuring balconies, these units style two large sliding glass windows that allow for spectacular and unparalleled views of the stadium and playing field. Only two of the Press Box level suites are available for use. The largest of the three is a personal suite for Mr. John Q. Hammons, owner of the facility.

Hammons Field also boasts one of the largest electronic scoreboards and JumboTrons in the country. This screen is used for on-field replays, between innings entertainment, as well as recaps from Major League games. Atop of this screen are the flags of all of the Texas League teams and their current standings as of the day of the game. During the Major League All-Star Game, Hammons Field holds All-Star celebrations in which patrons can watch the game on "the largest plasma screen television in Springfield."

Designed by the local architectural firm, Pellham Phillips Architects & Engineers, the stadium has been named as one of the most beautiful minor league stadiums in the country. In response, the Springfield Cardinals have enjoyed some of the minor league's highest fan attendance rates since the team relocated to Springfield in 2005.

Events[edit]

In 2004, 2007 and 2012, the venue hosted the Missouri Valley Conference Baseball Tournament.[6][7][8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nina, Rao (July 18, 2002). "Project Expected to be Completed by March 1, 2004". Springfield News-Leader. Retrieved March 2, 2012. 
  2. ^ Knight, Graham. "Hammons Field". Baseball Pilgrimages. Retrieved September 18, 2011. 
  3. ^ Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–2014. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  4. ^ Wells, Jeffrey D. (August 2004). "Play Ball!". Modern Steel Construction. Retrieved September 21, 2011. 
  5. ^ Mock, Joe. "Hammons Field in Springfield, MO". Baseball Parks. Retrieved September 21, 2011. 
  6. ^ "2004 MVC Baseball Championship". Missouri Valley Conference. Retrieved February 12, 2012. 
  7. ^ "2006-07 Championship Results". Missouri Valley Confrence. Retrieved February 12, 2012. 
  8. ^ "2011-12 Championship Info & Results". Missouri Valley Conference. Retrieved February 12, 2012. 

External links[edit]