Hammonton, New Jersey

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Hammonton, New Jersey
Town
Town of Hammonton
Nickname(s): "Blueberry Capital of the World"[1]
Map of Hammonton in Atlantic County
Map of Hammonton in Atlantic County
Census Bureau map of Hammonton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hammonton, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°39′39″N 74°46′01″W / 39.66078°N 74.767021°W / 39.66078; -74.767021Coordinates: 39°39′39″N 74°46′01″W / 39.66078°N 74.767021°W / 39.66078; -74.767021[2][3]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Atlantic
Incorporated March 5, 1866
Named for John Hammond Coffin
Government[6]
 • Type Town
 • Mayor Stephen DiDonato (term ends December 31, 2017)[4]
 • Clerk April Boyer Maimone[5]
Area[3]
 • Total 41.419 sq mi (107.274 km2)
 • Land 40.887 sq mi (105.897 km2)
 • Water 0.532 sq mi (1.377 km2)  1.28%
Area rank 50th of 566 in state
7th of 23 in county[3]
Elevation[7] 62 ft (19 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 14,791
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 14,799
 • Rank 169th of 566 in state
6th of 23 in county[12]
 • Density 361.8/sq mi (139.7/km2)
 • Density rank 464th of 566 in state
15th of 23 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08037[13][14]
Area code(s) 609[15]
FIPS code 3400129430[16][3][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885242[18][3]
Website www.townofhammonton.org

Hammonton is a town in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States, known as the "Blueberry Capital of the World." As of the 2010 United States Census, the town's population was 14,791,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 2,187 (+17.4%) from the 12,604 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 396 (+3.2%) from the 12,208 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Hammonton was settled in 1812 and was named for John Hammond Coffin, a son of one of the community's earliest settlers, William Coffin, with the "d" in what was originally "Hammondton" disappearing over time.[20] It was incorporated as a town by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 5, 1866, from portions of Hamilton Township and Mullica Township.[21] It is located directly between Philadelphia and the resort town of Atlantic City, along a former route of the Pennsylvania Railroad currently used by New Jersey Transit's Atlantic City Line.

Geography[edit]

Hammonton is located at 39°39′39″N 74°46′01″W / 39.66078°N 74.767021°W / 39.66078; -74.767021 (39.66078, −74.767021). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town had a total area of 41.419 square miles (107.274 km2), of which, 40.887 square miles (105.897 km2) of it was land and 0.532 square miles (1.377 km2) of it (1.28%) was water.[2][3]

The town borders Folsom borough, to the southwest, and both Hamilton and Mullica townships to the southeast. It also borders Camden County to the northwest, and Burlington County to the northeast. It is located in the Atlantic Coastal Plain, so is largely flat, though the highest point in Atlantic County is located along the Pennsylvania Railroad within the borders of Hammonton. The town is located almost exactly halfway between Philadelphia and Atlantic City.

Communities within the town include Barnard, Bellhurst, Caldwell Crossing, DaCosta, Great Swamp, Murphy, Rockford, Rockwood, Rosedale and West Mills.[22][23]

Pine Barrens[edit]

The town is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[24] All of the town is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Atlantic County, along with areas in Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[25]

Due to its location in the Pine Barrens, the soil is largely sandy, making it ideal for growing blueberries. Low, marshy areas, often within the Pine Barrens are also used for cranberry cultivation.

Climate[edit]

Hammonton lies in the northern reaches of the humid subtropical climate zone, and, similar to inland southern New Jersey, is characterized by brisk winters, hot summers, and plentiful precipitation spread evenly throughout the year. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Hammonton's climate is abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[26]

Climate data for Hammonton, New Jersey (1981–2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 41.1
(5.1)
44.0
(6.7)
52.0
(11.1)
63.2
(17.3)
72.4
(22.4)
82.2
(27.9)
86.8
(30.4)
84.9
(29.4)
78.1
(25.6)
66.7
(19.3)
56.3
(13.5)
45.5
(7.5)
64.4
(18)
Average low °F (°C) 23.0
(−5)
24.3
(−4.3)
31.4
(−0.3)
41.2
(5.1)
50.9
(10.5)
61.1
(16.2)
66.0
(18.9)
64.1
(17.8)
55.3
(12.9)
43.8
(6.6)
35.7
(2.1)
26.8
(−2.9)
43.6
(6.4)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.07
(78)
3.01
(76.5)
3.33
(84.6)
4.67
(118.6)
3.47
(88.1)
3.90
(99.1)
4.18
(106.2)
3.91
(99.3)
3.76
(95.5)
4.12
(104.6)
3.86
(98)
4.03
(102.4)
45.31
(1,150.9)
Snowfall inches (cm) 6.0
(15.2)
6.9
(17.5)
1.7
(4.3)
.2
(0.5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
3.3
(8.4)
18.1
(45.9)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 10.4 9.9 9.7 12.6 10.9 11.7 9.8 9.0 8.3 10.0 9.1 10.9 122.1
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 3.2 2.5 .8 .2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.2 7.9
Source: NOAA[27]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,404
1880 1,776 26.5%
1890 3,833 115.8%
1900 3,481 −9.2%
1910 5,088 46.2%
1920 6,417 26.1%
1930 7,656 19.3%
1940 7,668 0.2%
1950 8,411 9.7%
1960 9,854 17.2%
1970 11,464 16.3%
1980 12,298 7.3%
1990 12,208 −0.7%
2000 12,604 3.2%
2010 14,791 17.4%
Est. 2013 14,799 [11] 0.1%
Population sources: 1870-2000[28]
1870-1920[29] 1870[30][31] 1880-1890[32]
1890-1910[33] 1910-1930[34]
1930-1990[35] 2000[36][37] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 14,791 people, 5,408 households, and 3,759 families residing in the town. The population density was 361.8 per square mile (139.7/km2). There were 5,715 housing units at an average density of 139.8 per square mile (54.0/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 81.67% (12,080) White, 3.00% (444) Black or African American, 0.28% (42) Native American, 1.37% (203) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 10.81% (1,599) from other races, and 2.85% (421) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 20.93% (3,096) of the population.[8]

There were 5,408 households, of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.19.[8]

In the town, 23.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 26.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.6 years. For every 100 females there were 99.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.2 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $59,085 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,242) and the median family income was $62,354 (+/- $3,893). Males had a median income of $47,110 (+/- $4,411) versus $36,615 (+/- $3,549) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,292 (+/- $1,528). About 8.4% of families and 10.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.1% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.[38]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 12,604 people, 4,619 households, and 3,270 families residing in the town. The population density was 305.5 people per square mile (117.9/km2). There were 4,843 housing units at an average density of 117.4 per square mile (45.3/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 87.85% White, 1.74% African American, 0.14% Native American, 1.14% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 7.83% from other races, and 1.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.88% of the population.[36][37]

As of the 2000 Census, 45.9% of town residents were of Italian ancestry, the second-highest percentage of any municipality in the United States (behind Johnston, Rhode Island, at 46.7%), and highest in New Jersey, among all places with more than 1,000 residents identifying their ancestry.[39] News reports have said Hammonton leads the nation in Italian-Americans per capita.[40]

There were 4,619 households out of which 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.6% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.2% were non-families. 23.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.14.[36][37]

In the town the population was spread out with 22.8% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.7 males.[36][37]

The median income for a household in the town was $43,137, and the median income for a family was $52,205. Males had a median income of $36,219 versus $27,900 for females. The per capita income for the town was $19,889. About 5.7% of families and 9.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.0% of those under age 18 and 10.8% of those age 65 or over.[36][37]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hammonton is governed under the Town form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Town Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. The Mayor is elected to a four-year term. The Town Council consists of six members elected to serve two-year terms on a staggered basis, with three seats coming up for election each year.[6]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Hammonton is Independent Steve DiDonato, whose term of office ends December 31, 2017. Members of the Hammonton Town Council are Deputy Mayor Tom Gribbin (I, 2015), Dan Bachalis (I, 2014), Paul Esposito (I, 2014), Mickey Pullia (R, 2015), Sam Rodio (I, 2014) and Ed Wuillermin (I, 2015).[41][42][43]

The mayor and the majority of council members are affiliated with Hammonton First, an independent political organization that was established in 2005 and swept that November's elections, winning the mayoral seat and all three council seats.[44]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hammonton is located in the 2nd Congressional District[45] and is part of New Jersey's 8th state legislative district.[9][46][47] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Hammonton had been in the 9th state legislative district.[48]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[50][51] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[52][53]

For the 2004-15 Session, the 8th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Dawn Marie Addiego (R, Evesham Township) and in the General Assembly by Christopher J. Brown (R, Evesham Township) and Maria Rodriguez-Gregg (R, Evesham Township).[54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56]

Atlantic County is governed by a directly elected executive and a nine-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, responsible for legislation. The executive serves a four-year term and the freeholders are elected to staggered three-year terms, of which four are elected from the county on an at-large basis and five of the freeholders represent equally populated districts.[57][58] As of 2014, Atlantic County's Executive is Republican Dennis Levinson, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[59] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are Chairman Frank D. Formica, Freeholder District 2, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Linwood, Longport, Margate, Northfield, Somers Point and Ventnor (R, 2015),[60] Vice Chairman John W. Risley, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2014),[61] Colin G. Bell, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2015),[62] James A. Bertino, Freeholder District 5, including Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth (R, 2015),[63] Ernest D. Coursey, Freeholder District 1, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville (R, 2016),[64] Richard Dase, Freeholder District 4, including Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic (D, 2016),[65] Alexander C. Marino, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2014),[66] Will Pauls, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2016)[67] and Frank Sutton, Freeholder District 3, including Egg Harbor Township (part) and Hamilton Township (part) (R, 2014).[68][69][70] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Edward P. McGettigan (2016),[71] Sheriff Frank X. Balles (2014)[72] and Surrogate James Curcio (2015).[73][74]

Education[edit]

Students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade attend the Hammonton Public Schools. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's four schools had an enrollment of 3,493 students and 239.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.58:1.[75] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[76]) are Early Childhood Education Center[77] (PreK-1st grade; 413 students), Warren E. Sooy Elementary School[78] (2-5; 899), Hammonton Middle School[79] (6-8; 817) and Hammonton High School[80] (9-12; 1,364).[81]

Students from Folsom Borough (grades 9-12) and Waterford Township in Camden County (7-12) attend the Hammonton schools as part of sending/receiving relationships with the Folsom Borough School District and the Waterford Township School District.[82] [83][84]

In the wake of the dissolution of the Lower Camden County Regional School District, the Hammonton board of education voted in 1999 to begin accepting an estimated 800 students from Waterford Township for grades 7-12 starting as of 2002, with the tuition paid by students from Waterford helping to lower overall costs to Hammonton taxpayers.[85]

Town public school students are also eligible to attend the Atlantic County Institute of Technology in the Mays Landing section of Hamilton Township[86] or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.[87]

Hammonton is home of the Catholic schools St. Joseph Regional Elementary School (for PreK-8[88]) and St. Joseph High School (for grades 9-12[89]) which operate under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Camden.[90]

Media outlets[edit]

Television stations[edit]

Newspapers[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Airport[edit]

Hammonton Municipal Airport is located 3 miles (4.8 km) northeast of the central business district.[94]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the town had a total of 126.50 miles (203.58 km) of roadways, of which 77.04 miles (123.98 km) were maintained by the municipality, 30.61 miles (49.26 km) by Atlantic County and 14.65 miles (23.58 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 4.20 miles (6.76 km) by the South Jersey Transportation Authority.[95]

Atlantic City Expressway, U.S. Route 30, U.S. Route 206 and Route 54 all pass through Hammonton, as do County Route 536, County Route 542, County Route 559 and County Route 561.

Public transportation[edit]

The Hammonton station[96] of New Jersey Transit provides passenger rail service between the Atlantic City Rail Terminal in Atlantic City and 30th Street Station in Philadelphia and intermediate points on the Atlantic City Line.[97]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service in Hammonton on the 554 route between Lindenwold station and Atlantic City.[98][99]

Community[edit]

Blueberry capital[edit]

Hammonton is known as the "Blueberry Capital of the World."[100]

Since the 1980s, the Red, White and Blueberry Festival has celebrated Hammonton's status as the nation's blueberry capital.[101] The Hammonton Wine Festival, a fundraiser for the area Rotary Club, celebrates the area's winemakers.[102]

Presidential visits[edit]

Ronald Reagan visited Hammonton during his 1984 re-election campaign. Reagan's speech highlighted Hammonton's status as "Blueberry Capital of the World" and then extolled the virtues of New Jersey native Bruce Springsteen.[103]

Hammonton has also been visited by Ulysses S. Grant and Theodore Roosevelt, who made whistle stops in the town, as well as by Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy while President or during their presidential campaigns.[104]

Festivals[edit]

Every year Hammonton hosts the Red, White and Blueberry festival, Our Lady of Mount Carmel festival and the Hammonton wine festival. Mount Carmel's Italian Festival dates back to 1875 and is considered the oldest such continuously run festival in the United States.[105]

Downtown[edit]

Hammonton's downtown district has been growing for the past 20 years. The downtown area includes Bellevue Avenue, Central Avenue, Vine street, Second Street, Third Street, Twelfth Street, Egg Harbor Road, Front Street, West End Avenue, Railroad Avenue and Washington Street. The downtown includes art galleries, restaurants, wine and sports bars, banks, clothing stores,offices, a theatre, a park, and a college satellite campus, attracting shoppers from South Jersey.[106]

Every year the downtown has two major parades which are the Halloween and Christmas parades. It also hosts a smaller parade every year, the Memorial Day parade. the Downtown also host the annual Christmas Tree Lighting, which is a large celebration that includes, the lighting of a large tree on the corner of Bellevue and Central Avenue, Christmas carolers, a music show, carriage rides, a live nativity and the arrival of Santa. During these events the downtown stores are open late.

On the third Thursday of every month, the downtown host the "Third Thursday Events", with a different theme each month. Stores offer discounts, and people perform on the street.

The downtown was one of the finalist for the Great American Main Street Award in 2013. The award recognizes three communities each year for their successful revitalization efforts, based on documented economic impact, small-business development, historic preservation, volunteer involvement, public/private cooperation and success over time.[107]

Events[edit]

In 1949, Hammonton was the winner of the Little League World Series, after finishing third in the tournament in both 1947 and 1948. The Hammonton team was the first official team located outside of Pennsylvania.[108]

On July 24, 2011, Ricca's Italian Bakery set a Guinness World Record for the Longest Line of Cakes.[109]

Wineries and alcohol consumption[edit]

Hammonton has three active wineries - DiMatteo Vineyards, Plagido's Winery, and Tomasello Winery.[105]

On June 7, 2013, the Eagle Theatre in Hammonton became the first theater in New Jersey to sell alcoholic beverages and allow spectators to drink wine during the show. Under an arrangement reached under the authority of the New Jersey Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control, Sharrott Winery will be able to sell patrons bottles of wine that can be consumed during shows at the theater.[110]

Popular culture[edit]

The 2002 film, 13th Child, about the hunt for the Jersey Devil, was filmed in Hammonton. The film featured big names such as Cliff Robertson, Lesley-Anne Down, and Christopher Atkins.[111]

A 2011 episode of Supernatural, "How to Win Friends and Influence Monsters", is set in Hammonton, though it wasn't filmed there.[citation needed]

Hammonton made a cameo appearance in the first two episodes of the HBO series Boardwalk Empire, with a scene towards the end of both episodes showing the town sign "Welcome to Hammonton, The Blueberry Capital of the World".[112]

The FOX TV show American Idol aired its first episode of its 12th season in January 2013 with a performance by Sarah Restuccio, a seventeen-year-old girl from Hammonton. The judges enjoyed her rendition of "Mama's Song" by Carrie Underwood, but she impressed them when they asked her to sing something else and she rapped "Super Bass" by Nicki Minaj. The show featured a short clip about Sarah's life, which included showing her everyday life in Hammonton.[113][114]

In October 2013 the MTV reality show True Life, featured the episode "True Life Presents: My Dad Is A Bro" about a girl in her twenties and her father in his fifties, who both party. The episode takes place throughout Hammonton.[115]

In the summer of 2013, scenes from the independent film The Honour were filmed in Hammonton.[116]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hammonton include:

Sister cities[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Urgo, Jacqueline L. "Blueberries get their due", The Philadelphia Inquirer, January 25, 2004. Accessed May 19, 2008. "In this Atlantic County farming community, where crops are king and ancestral connections to the land run deep, they didn't need the state to tell them the blueberry is special. After all, almost everyone in this town of 12,600 - already dubbed the 'Blueberry Capital of the World' - seems to have at least some connection to the berry."
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  4. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerks's Office, Town of Hammonton. Accessed June 25, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 49.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Town of Hammonton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Hammonton town, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hammonton town, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 22, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hammonton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 3, 2011.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 10, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Hammonton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 10, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 25, 2012.
  20. ^ General History, Town of Hammonton. Accessed July 17, 2012. "Hammonton is named for one of Coffin’s sons, John Hammond Coffin. What began as “Hammondton” later evolved into what we have today, minus the “d”. (FYI: Coffin’s other son Edward Winslow Coffin went on to found, you guessed it: Winslow!)"
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 69. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  22. ^ Local Names, New Jersey Department of Transportation, October 2004. Accessed November 16, 2013.
  23. ^ List of Municipalities in Atlantic County, New Jersey and Local Place Names, Atlantic County, New Jersey GenWeb. Accessed December 26, 2013.
  24. ^ The Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  25. ^ Pinelands Municipalities, New Jersey Pinelands Commission, April 2003. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  26. ^ Climate Summary for Hammonton, New Jersey
  27. ^ "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2012-03-04. 
  28. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Atlantic County Municipalities, 1840 - 1905, WestJersey.org. Accessed June 25, 2012.
  29. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  30. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 273, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed November 18, 2013. "Hammonton contains a population of 1,404."
  31. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed September 10, 2013.
  32. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  33. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  34. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  35. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  36. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hammonton town, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  37. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hammonton town, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  38. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hamilton township, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 25, 2012.
  39. ^ Italian Communities, EPodunk. Accessed June 9, 2007.
  40. ^ Hammonton, N.J., Leads Nation In Per-Capita Italians: South Jersey Town Known As Blueberry Capital Of The World, NBC10, June 5, 2002. Source shows 54% of population is of Italian ancestry, but provides no primary source for data.
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  82. ^ Schools, Towns of Hammonton. Accessed September 15, 2014. "Residents from Waterford attend grades 7 through 12. Residents of Folsom and Collings Lake attend the Hammonton High School in grades 9 through 12 at a brand-new high school on a 118-acre campus."
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  102. ^ About, Hammonton Wine Festival. Accessed May 29, 2013.
  103. ^ "America's future rests in a thousand dreams inside your hearts.", text of speech delivered by Ronald Reagan on September 19, 1984, My Hammonton. Accessed October 24, 2007. "You know, today my treat is seeing for the first time the Blueberry Capital of the world.... It rests in the message of hope in songs of a man so many young Americans admire -- New Jersey's own, Bruce Springsteen."
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  105. ^ a b DiUlio, Nick. "NJ's Most Italian TownIt started with a single Sicilian farmer in 1863. Now Hammonton has the highest percentage of Italians in the Garden State.", New Jersey Monthly, January 17, 2012. Accessed May 29, 2013. "But the standout event on the calendar is the annual Italian Festival sponsored by the Our Lady of Mount Carmel Society. What began in 1875 as a traditional Roman Catholic two-mile long procession of saints has evolved into the longest running Italian festival in the country, with a weeklong carnival and festivities erupting every July.... The town is home to three celebrated South Jersey vineyards: Plagido’s Winery, DiMatteo Vineyards and Tomasello Winery, which was started by one of the town’s oldest Italian families and has been making wine for almost 80 years."
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  109. ^ Longest Line of Cakes, Guinness World Records. Accessed June 14, 2013. "The longest line of cakes measured 571.5 m (1,875 ft) and was achieved by Ricca's Italian Bakery (USA) in Hammonton, on 24 July 2011."
  110. ^ Post, Michelle Brunetti. "Wine sales planned at Hammonton's Eagle Theatre", The Press of Atlantic City, June 5, 2013, updated June 6, 2013. Accessed June 14, 2013. "Starting Friday night, audience members at The Eagle Theatre will be able to enjoy a glass of wine before and during shows. Sharrott Winery, located just over the border from Hammonton in Winslow Township, has gotten permission from the state Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell half and full bottles of wine at the theater.... It is the first such agreement in New Jersey, said Eagle Theatre President Jim Donio."
  111. ^ Nash, Margo. "The Devil You Think You Know", The New York Times, October 13, 2002. Accessed August 4, 2013. "Most of the film, made by Painted Zebra Productions, was shot at Wharton State Forest, Historic Batsto Village and Hammonton in the Pine Barrens. Its stars include Cliff Robertson, Robert Guillaume, Christopher Atkins, Lesley-Anne Down and Michelle Maryk."
  112. ^ Procida, Lee. "Hammonton welcomes Boardwalk Empire sign", The Press of Atlantic City, April 29, 2011. Accessed October 22, 2012. "In the first episode of "Boardwalk Empire," an ill-fated group of bootleggers passes by a wooden sign that reads 'Welcome to Hammonton, The Blueberry Capital of the World.'"
  113. ^ "Season 12 Road to Hollywood: Sarah Restuccio", American Idol, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 22, 2013. Accessed September 15, 2014. "Sarah Restuccio auditioned for American Idol in honor of a friend that had passed away. Discover more about this Hammonton, NJ resident."
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  115. ^ "True Life Presents: My Dad Is A Bro", MTV. Accessed December 9, 2013.
  116. ^ Staff. "Indie Film, The Honour, Shot in Hammonton", Courier-Post, August 2, 2013. Accessed December 9, 2013. "Daria Berenato (left) of Hammonton and Christina Heath of Hamilton film a scene in their upcoming indie film called The Honour. The LGBT film was shot in Hammonton and other places around South Jersey."
  117. ^ #2 Tyler Bellamy, Defender, Rochester Rhinos. Accessed August 4, 2013. "Hometown: Hammonton, NJ"
  118. ^ a b LaBan, Craig. "Blueberries to tacos: South Jersey town's shift de cuisine", The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 28, 2012. Accessed October 22, 2012. "It's the birthplace of the vice president's wife, Jill Biden, not to mention the hometown of pro wrestler Gary 'The Pitbull' Wolfe."
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  127. ^ Margaret Mead, American National Biography. Accessed December 26, 2013. "Before Margaret Mead reached her teens, she accompanied her mother on field trips to Hammonton, New Jersey, where Emily Mead was engaged in sociological research among Italian immigrants."
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  132. ^ Steckler, Jared. "Hammonton girl adjusts, wins gymnastics title", Courier-Post, July 28, 2014. Accessed September 15, 2014. "'Grace under pressure,' Tom assured her, speaking from personal experience as a former professional wrestler from the WWE and WWF Superstars of Wrestling, perhaps better known by his ring names Tony Ricca or The Pharaoh."
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  136. ^ La Gorce, Tammy. "Finding Emo", The New York Times, August 14, 2005. Accessed October 22, 2007. "Richard Reines, who owns Drive-Thru Records, which is based in the San Fernando Valley in California, believes in the New Jersey scene; Drive-Thru's roster includes Hidden in Plain View from Stanhope and the Early November from Hammonton."
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