Han Sai Por

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Han Sai Por (韩少芙)
HanSaiPor-Seeds-NationalMuseumofSingapore-20090614-04.jpg
The smaller of two pieces making up Han's Seeds (2006), at the National Museum of Singapore
Born Han Sai Por
(1943-07-19) 19 July 1943 (age 70)
Singapore
Nationality Singaporean
Education Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (1968); East Ham College of Art (1980); Wolverhampton College of Art (B.A. (Hons.) (Fine Art), 1983); Lincoln University
Known for Sculpture
Notable work(s) Seed Series (1998); 20 Tonnes (2002)
Movement Postmodernism
Awards Cultural Medallion for Art (1995); winner, drawing and sculpture section, XI Triennale – India (New Delhi, 2005); Outstanding City Sculpture Award (China, 2006)
Website
www.hansaipor.com
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Han (Chinese: ; pinyin: Hán).

Han Sai Por (Chinese: 韩少芙; pinyin: Hán Shàofú;[1] born 19 July 1943) is a Singaporean sculptor. A graduate of the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (NAFA), East Ham College of Art, Wolverhampton College of Art (now the School of Art and Design of the University of Wolverhampton) and Lincoln University, New Zealand, she worked as a teacher and later as a part-time lecturer at NAFA, the LASALLE-SIA College of the Arts, and the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, before becoming a full-time artist in 1997.

Han has participated in exhibitions locally and abroad, including events in China, Denmark, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand and South Korea. Her first solo exhibition, entitled Four Dimensions, was held at the National Museum Art Gallery in 1993. Her sculptures can be found around the world, in Osaka and Shōdoshima, Kagawa Prefecture, in Japan; Kuala Lumpur and Sarawak in Malaysia; and Washington, D.C. In Singapore, sculptures commissioned from her can be seen at Capital Tower, the Defence Science Organisation National Laboratories, the Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay, the National Museum of Singapore, Revenue House, Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 3, Suntec City Mall, and Woodlands Regional Library. In 2001, Han was the founding President of the Sculpture Society (Singapore) and remains its Honorary President. She was the first artist in residence at the Society's Sculpture Pavilion at Fort Canning Park in 2009, where she worked on sculptures made from the trunks of tembusu trees.

Han is probably best known for her stone sculptures with organic forms, examples of which include Growth (1985), Spirit of Nature (1988), Object C (1992) and Seeds (2006). The last work, presently located in the grounds of the National Museum, consists of two large kernels carved from sandstone excavated from Fort Canning Hill during the Museum's redevelopment. However, her oeuvre is broad, and includes Four Dimensions (1993), a collection of geometrical structures; and 20 Tonnes (2002), also installed at the Museum, which consists of a row of six ridged monolithic blocks with a smaller block at either end, all hewn from a single granite rock.

For her contributions to art, Han was conferred the Cultural Medallion for Art in 1995. She was also the winner of the sculpture and painting section at the 11th Triennale – India organized by the Lalit Kala Akademi (National Academy of Art of India) in 2005, and the Outstanding City Sculpture Award in China the following year.

Early life and education[edit]

Han Sai Por was born on 19 July 1943 in Singapore during the Japanese occupation. She was one of six children of a poor couple, and her family were squatters living in Changi in a house made of cardboard boxes and coconut leaves. Nonetheless, Han had a happy childhood, and went to a nearby beach to make figurine animals out of sand. This experience helped her to appreciate nature and instilled in her a sense of adventure and exploration. At ten years of age, Han was introduced to Michelangelo's sculptures through a book given to her by her mother.[2][3]

Han was educated at Yock Eng High School (now Yuying Secondary School)[4] and subsequently at the Singapore Teachers' Training College between 1965 and 1968. While working as a teacher, she attended part-time courses at the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (NAFA) from 1975 to 1977. Having saved some money, she went to the United Kingdom where she studied fine art at the East Ham College of Art (1979–1980) and the Wolverhampton College of Art (1980–1983),[5] receiving a B.A. (Hons.) in Fine Art from the latter.[2][6] She worked as a cook, hotel maid, waitress and street artist to support herself.[3][7]

Han returned to Singapore in 1983 and was one of the two pioneer teachers appointed to the new Arts Elective Programme at the Nanyang Girls' High School.[8] In 1987, to support her personal artistic endeavours, Han also began to teach part-time at NAFA, the LASALLE-SIA College of the Arts (both 1987–1993),[3][9] and the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (1994–1996).[10] Subsequently, she pursued further studies in landscape architecture at Lincoln University in Lincoln, Canterbury, in New Zealand.[10]

Artistic career[edit]

Shimmering Pearls I (1999), Han's first work in glass,[9] in front of Capital Tower, photographed on 2 February 2006

Han has participated in exhibitions locally and abroad, including events in China, Denmark, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand and South Korea. Over 24 hours between New Year's Eve 1989 and New Year's Day 1990, she took part in The Time Show organized by The Artists Village, which has been described as "definitely a high point in the history of art in Singapore when an exceptionally wide spectrum of artists expressing in an equally wide range of mediums participated in a single art event".[11] Han's first solo exhibition was Four Dimensions at the National Museum Art Gallery from 18 to 28 February 1993.[12] Other solo shows she has given in Singapore are Rainforest (Plastique Kinetic Worms, 1999) and 20 Tonnes – Physical Consequences (Ministry of Information, Communications and the Arts ARTrium, 2002).[13]

Han became a full-time sculptor in 1997.[10] Her works can be found around the world: Childhood Dream (1992) at the Uchinomi-cho Town Hall Garden on the island of Shōdoshima in Kagawa Prefecture, Japan; Pisces (1993) at the Yashiro Hoshi-no Choukoku Centre Park in Osaka, Japan; Spirit of Nature III (1990) at the Kuching Waterfront Development in Sarawak, Malaysia; Towards Peace (1987) in the Kuala Lumpur Lake Gardens, Malaysia;[14] and Cactus, Tropical Leaves (both 1994) and The Wave of Life at the Embassy of Singapore in Washington, D.C.[9][15] In Singapore, sculptures commissioned from her can be seen at Capital Tower (Shimmering Pearls I, 1999),[16] the Defence Science Organisation National Laboratories (Tropical Brain Forest, 2003),[17] the Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay (Seed Series, 1998),[18] the National Museum of Singapore (20 Tonnes, 2002; and Seeds, 2006), One Marina Boulevard (Progressive Flows, 2004),[9] Orchard MRT Station (Goddess of Happiness, 1985),[9] Revenue House (Spring, 1996),[19] Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 3 (Flora Inspiration, 2007),[20] Singapore Changi Airport VIP Complex (Singapore – A Garden City, 2004),[9] Suntec City Mall (Chinese Zodiac Medallions, 1995),[21] UOB Plaza (Two Figures, 1993),[9] and Woodlands Regional Library (Rain Forest).[3][22]

Flora Inspiration (2007) at Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 3, photographed on 8 January 2008

In 2001, Han was the founding President of the Sculpture Society (Singapore),[23] and remains its Honorary President.[24] In May 2009, she was the first artist in residence at the Society's Sculpture Pavilion at Fort Canning Park where she worked on sculptures made from the trunks of tembusu trees. The project, sponsored by the Asia Pacific Breweries Foundation Inspire Programme, was intended to provide sculptors and installation artists with studio space and a chance to interact with the public in a park environment.[25] Han was a member of the Fourth Singapore Note and Coin Advisory Committee between 1 July 2008 and 30 June 2011, where her duties included advising the Monetary Authority of Singapore on designs for new currency.[26]

In 2005, with the assistance of the National Arts Council (NAC) and the Jurong Town Corporation (JTC), she relocated from Seletar Air Base to Workloft@Wessex, a walk-up apartment in Wessex Estate which had been converted by JTC from an army camp into an artists' village.[27]

Art[edit]

Seeds (2006) in the grounds of the National Museum of Singapore, photographed on 14 June 2009

Han is probably best known for her stone sculptures with organic forms; she sees her sculpture has having "a force or inner life inside struggling to get out".[28] Having a preference for granite and marble,[3] she has said: "Stone is one of my favourite materials. In the erosion of rock by wind and water are found original, vital qualities which express the significance of life."[29] Han often purchases stone using her own resources from quarries in China, Italy, Japan, Malaysia and Singapore. The cost of just the material for solo exhibition pieces can be up to S$20,000. Nonetheless, she is motivated by the encouragement, recognition and acknowledgement her art she receives from others.[3] Examples of Han's sculptures of this genre include Growth (1985), a set of five pear-shaped forms in white marble;[30] Spirit of Nature (1988), three black granite ovoid and spheroid forms;[31] Object C (1992), a pale grey granite object resembling a canoe;[32] and Seeds (2006), large kernels carved from sandstone excavated from Fort Canning Hill during the National Museum's redevelopment.[33] Art historian and critic T.K. Sabapathy has commented that Han is concerned with the uneasy relation between men and nature in the modern era, and has expressed a desire for people to realize that "[we] are part of nature and not apart from nature".[34] In addition, he has said:

Her sculptures appear to embody forces whose origins are to be found in the very beginnings of the art of sculpture. What we have here, especially in the works carved out of stone, is sculpture in its embryonic form. Her works are made up of compact, entirely solid mass of material which she shapes but does not perforate or open up. They are the outcome of a single-minded concentration on mass and volume. This approach leads to the creation of what can be described as kernel sculpture. The works have the strength and durability of primal or elementary forms. They retain the presence and weight of the monolith, and appeal to us with their provocative simplicity. In all these respects Han reasserts the fundamental qualities of sculpture, namely, a sensation of volume and material, tactile quality and ponderability. ... [Her works] radiate energy and materiality which, together, appear to be continually forming and re-forming into new and surprising configurations; essential to them is the indivisible or continuous single surface. These works beckon us to enter into realms that are stable, tranquil and sublime. Han gives her fellow man an affirmative, uplifting view of life.[35]

20 Tonnes (2002), photographed on 14 June 2009

Beyond Han's sculptures which embrace organic forms, she has also designed geometric pieces. Four Dimensions (1993) was made up of ten geometrical structures, including single objects (such as Tetrahedron–Tetrahedron Interpenetration)[36] and opened-up planes (Cubic Triangle)[37] connected with each other through the use of angles, and light and shadow. Han said: "My works are based on the concept of mathematical logic. The idea is to show how each step is based on the previous one so that the geometrical forms progress in logical sequence ... The fourth dimension is abstract. It cannot be seen or touched. It contains the feelings and talents of Mankind. We wish to possess this space and to open it up for all people to share."[38] Sabapathy was somewhat critical of these works, saying that they dealt only with techniques and fabrication and did not "disclose fresh insights into space and its articulation". He expressed the hope that Han would stay the course and deepen her investigation beyond form into an exploration of light, colour and materials to "create environments in which form, space and time can be seen to be related in ever-changing yet intelligent systems".[39]

20 Tonnes, first exhibited in 2002 in the atrium of the MICA Building (formerly the Old Hill Street Police Station) and now permanently installed in front of the National Museum, consists of a row of six ridged monolithic granite blocks with a smaller block at either end, all hewn from a single rock. Han called the work "an explanation of nature's physical reaction when it is impacted by force, gravity and energy",[40] and commented: "When I am working on stone, the immediate context is physical, the force of hammering, chiseling and drilling hard stone creates heat and energy. The reaction of the particles causes sparks and waves of sound. The appearance of the stone is the result, the consequent physical reaction. Understanding the character of nature through the physical context has become part of my sculpture."[41]

According to art curator Tay Swee Lin, Han's sculptures "exude smooth, sensual lines that are quietly engaging and tactile", and her art "is a testimony of beauty with meditative quietness belying a resilience and strength that stone and metal encompass. The artist's personal relationship with her art is one that is complete – her sculptures are crafted by hand from start to finish; painstakingly carved, sanded and polished. ... In land scarce Singapore, Han's work encapsulates the appreciation and understanding of the delicate balance of nature that exists in an urban environment."[42]

In the catalogue accompanying her Four Dimensions exhibition, Han said: "Postmodernism accepts the facts that art does not follow any rigid man-made rules. If the artist says, 'this is art' then it is art, provided only that the artist can demonstrate a valuable idea or concept. Art needs man to judge and decide whether it is indeed art."[43]

Awards and honours[edit]

A seed sculpture by Han at the St. Regis Singapore hotel, photographed on 26 April 2008

In 1988, Han won the Best Entry Award from the Singapore National Theatre Trust for her participation in a show entitled Basics at the National Museum Art Gallery.[9] She was awarded a scholarship for the Portland Sculpture Park on the Isle of Portland in Dorset, England, by the Arts Council of Great Britain and the National Arts Council (NAC) in 1990. Together with the installation artist S. Chandrasekaran, she helped to transform an old limestone quarry into a sculpture park,[44] creating a work called Flow through the Rocks.[9] In 1993 she received sponsorship from the Singapore International Foundation to attend the International Painting and Sculpture Symposium in Gulbarga (Kalburgi) in Karnataka, India,[3] and served on the NAC's Arts Resource Panel between 1993 and 1994.[9]

In 1995, Han was conferred the Cultural Medallion for Art by the Minister for Communications, Information and the Arts.[45] In her award citation, she was described as "a consummate carver" with "arduous and physically demanding relationships with materials" who had "always been passionate and emphatic about sculpture".[2] She was also a finalist for the Women Inspire Awards 2002,[46] and the winner of the sculpture and painting section at the 11th Triennale – India organized by the Lalit Kala Akademi (National Academy of Art of India) in 2005 for her Bud, Leaf and Seed Series.[3][47] The following year, she won the Outstanding City Sculpture Award in China.[3]

In September 2008, Han was one of seven Cultural Medallion winners to receive an $80,000 grant from the NAC's CM Grant programme to fund a project involving site-specific installations based on Singapore flora.[48]

Major exhibitions[edit]

Dates Title Medium Location
1985 2nd Asian Art Show Fukuoka Art Museum
Fukuoka, Japan
1985 Singapore Sculpture Exhibition Sculpture National Museum Art Gallery
Singapore
1986 Contemporary Asian Art Show National Museum of Modern Art
Seoul, South Korea
1987 Towards Peace: 5th Asian Sculpture Symposium Sculpture Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
1988 Basics[9] Sculpture National Museum Art Gallery
Singapore
1989 3rd Asian Art Show Fukuoka Art Museum
Fukuoka, Japan
September 1989 Six Men Sculpture Exhibition[35] Sculpture Orchard Point Exhibition Hall
Singapore
31 December 1989 –
1 January 1990
The Time Show The Artists Village
Singapore
16 November –
15 December 1991
Sculpture in Singapore[49] Sculpture National Museum Art Gallery
Singapore
1991 Quarry Art Exhibition Sculpture British Council
Singapore
1992 Shodoshima International Sculpture Symposium Sculpture Shōdoshima, Kagawa Prefecture, Japan
18–28 February 1993 Four Dimensions[39][50]
(solo exhibition)
Sculpture installation National Museum Art Gallery
Singapore
22 May –
6 June 1993
ESPACE 3356[51] Raffles City Atrium and The Substation Gallery, Singapore
1993 Yashiro International Sculpture Symposium Sculpture Yashiro, Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan
1996 Højer International Sculpture Symposium Sculpture (Wonder Wall, Vejle)[9] Højer, Denmark
1997 International Snow Sculpture Sculpture Quebec, Canada
29 August–
11 October 1998
IMPRINTS on Singapore Art: Works of 40 Nafa Artists[52] Sculpture Singapore Art Museum
Singapore
1999 Rainforest
(solo exhibition)
Charcoal and ink drawings, sculpture Plastique Kinetic Worms
Singapore
Three and a half months from 21 May 1999 Volume and Form[53] Sculpture Singapore
2000 Art in the Park 2000 Sculpture (Fern)[9] Christchurch, New Zealand
2000 Orchid Journey Sculpture installation Suzhou, Jiangsu, China
12 September–
18 November 2001
Pulp Friction: Materials in Contemporary Art[54] Sculpture Singapore Art Museum
Singapore
21 June 2002 Borrowed Scenery[55] Site-specific work Indonesia
13–24 March 2002 20 Tonnes – Physical Consequences[56]
(solo exhibition)
Sculpture installation Ministry of Information, Communications and the Arts ARTrium
Singapore
2003 Yogyakarta Arts Festival[9] Sculpture (Inside the Bamboo Forest) Yogyakarta, Indonesia
14 January –
10 February 2005
XI Triennale – India[47] Drawings, sculpture Crafts Museum
New Delhi, India
30 March –
20 May 2005
Selected Artworks by Han Sai Por and Ahmad Osni Peii[57] Sculpture Sculpture Square
Singapore
13 January –
5 March 2006
1 Singapore Artist: Han Sai Por[58]
(solo exhibition)
Sculpture Sculpture Square
Singapore
20 December 2008–
17 January 2009
Nanyang 70 Years After: A Reunion of Artists in the Academy[59] Sculpture Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts
Singapore

Some of the information in the table above was obtained from Han Sai Por, Women in the Arts, Singapore (WITAS), 2000, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 12 June 2009 .

Works[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ NAFA icons: Cultural Medallion, Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts, 2007, archived from the original on 1 May 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 .
  2. ^ a b c Ida Bachtiar (1 September 1995), "Never say die – childhood poverty made life richer", The Straits Times (Life!): 1–2 .
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Nureza Ahmad (2 August 2004), Han Sai Por, Singapore Infopedia, National Library Board, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 12 June 2009 .
  4. ^ Leong Weng Kam (20 November 1998), "Beginning – with 30 students", The Straits Times .
  5. ^ The Wolverhampton College of Art merged with the Staffordshire and Wolverhampton Technical College in 1969 to form The Polytechnic, Wolverhampton, and in 1992 the institution became the University of Wolverhampton: Sally Alt, University of Wolverhampton, Hoover's, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 12 June 2009 .
  6. ^ In a 2005 catalogue of works exhibited by Han at the XI Triennial – India, art curator Tay Swee Lin wrote that Han was conferred a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) from the Wolverhampton College of Art: see Han Sai Por (2005), Han Sai Por, Singapore: National Arts Council, OCLC 233928427 .
  7. ^ Arthur Sim (15 March 2002), "Living stones", The Straits Times .
  8. ^ B. Pereira (6 October 1983), "Two overseas-trained art teachers kick off classes for budding artists", The Singapore Monitor .
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Han Sai Por (2005).
  10. ^ a b c Artist biography, Han Sai Por, retrieved 12 June 2009 [dead link].
  11. ^ Kwok Kian Chow (1996), Channels & Confluences: A History of Singapore Art, Singapore: National Heritage Board; Singapore Art Museum, p. 144, ISBN 978-981-00-7488-3 .
  12. ^ Tan Yen Peng (October 2005), Featured artist of the month: Han Sai Por, Sculpture Society (Singapore), p. 1, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 .
  13. ^ Han Sai Por, Women in the Arts, Singapore (WITAS), 2000, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 12 June 2009 .
  14. ^ Redza Piyadasa (13 May 1995), "Bold ASEAN vision of sculpture parks", Business Times (Singapore) ; Peter Schoppert, Han Sai Por, Nusantara.com: Homepage for Peter Schoppert, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 .
  15. ^ "'Cover girl' puts S'pore in limelight once again", The Straits Times, 23 August 1999 .
  16. ^ Mayo Martin (15 July 2008), "Wherefore, art, are thou?", Today (reproduced on the Channel NewsAsia website) .
  17. ^ "Tropical Brain Forest ...", The Straits Times, 25 January 2003 ; "Tropical Brainforest", Today, 27 January 2003 : see The brain trust, Nusantara.com: Homepage for Peter Schoppert, 28 January 2003, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 14 June 2009 .
  18. ^ Tong Ming Chien (9 October 1996), "Sowing seeds of creativity at SAC", The Straits Times ; Clarissa Oon (20 May 1998), "Giant fruits and gourds 'grow' in Fort Canning", The Straits Times .
  19. ^ "Exploring a versatile nature", Business Times (Singapore), 8 January 2000 .
  20. ^ Public sculpture: Flora Series, Han Sai Por, archived from the original on 18 April 2009, retrieved 15 June 2009 .
  21. ^ Chin Soo Fang (13 October 1995), "Vision of abundance, zodiac medallions for Suntec City", The Straits Times .
  22. ^ Ong Sor Fern (29 April 2001), "Out of the Woodlands ... comes the National Library's biggest baby – a regional library that is twice the size of the one at Tampines", The Straits Times .
  23. ^ Han Sai Por (2006), Message: Soul = Bread and butter, Sculpture Society (Singapore), archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 .
  24. ^ [About us], Sculpture Society (Singapore), 2009, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 .
  25. ^ Clarissa Tan (22 May 2009), "Chipping away at old notions of art", Business Times (Singapore) .
  26. ^ Fourth Singapore Note and Coin Advisory Committee (3-year term from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2011), Monetary Authority of Singapore, 23 June 2008, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 14 June 2009 .
  27. ^ "Han Sai Por finds new home" (PDF), Instep (National Arts Council), November–December 2005: 2, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 14 June 2009 ; Cheah Ui-hoon (17 February 2006), "Creative workspace", Business Times (Singapore) ; Hong Xinyi (26 February 2008), "A bit of bohemian buzz for sleepy Wessex Estate: Art studio, bar and eateries will be added to new town square in artists' enclave", The Straits Times .
  28. ^ Han Sai Por (1993), Four Dimensions: A Sculptural Installation, Singapore: Sheen's Gallery, p. 6, ISBN 978-981-00-4392-6 .
  29. ^ Han, Four Dimensions, p. 7: see Tan, "Han Sai Por", p. 2.
  30. ^ See Growth by Han Sai Por, Contemporary Postcolonial & Postimperial Literature in English, University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore, April 2000, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 , from Kwok, Channels & Confluences, plate 112.
  31. ^ See Spirit of Nature by Han Sai Por, Contemporary Postcolonial & Postimperial Literature in English, University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore, April 2000, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 , from Kwok, Channels & Confluences, plate 113.
  32. ^ See Object C by Han Sai Por, Contemporary Postcolonial & Postimperial Literature in English, University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore, April 2000, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 , from Kwok, Channels & Confluences, plate 114.
  33. ^ Seeds by Han Sai Por (Singapore), National Museum of Singapore, 2006, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 ; Marguerita Tan, "Hidden treasures", Time Out Singapore (reproduced on the Singapore Tourism Board website), archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 14 June 2009 .
  34. ^ T.K. Sabapathy (1991), Sculpture in Singapore: National Museum Art Gallery, Singapore, 16 November – 15 December 1991, Singapore: National Museum Art Gallery, p. 12, ISBN 978-9971-917-35-7 : see Tan Yen Peng (October 2005), Featured artist of the month: Han Sai Por, Sculpture Society (Singapore), p. 2, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 .
  35. ^ a b T.K. Sabapathy (28 September 1989), "Five artists and their guru", The Straits Times .
  36. ^ See Featured artwork of the month: Han Sai Por: Four Dimensions: Tetrahedron–Tetrahedron Interpenetration, Sculpture Society (Singapore), October 2005, p. 1, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 .
  37. ^ See Featured artwork of the month: Han Sai Por: Four Dimensions: Cubic Triangle, Sculpture Society (Singapore), October 2005, p. 3, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 .
  38. ^ Han, Four Dimensions, p. 11: see Tan Yen Peng (October 2005), Featured artist of the month: Han Sai Por, Sculpture Society (Singapore), p. 3, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 .
  39. ^ a b T.K. Sabapathy (18 February 1993), "Plane shapes", The Straits Times .
  40. ^ Han, Sai Por (2002), Sculpture, Singapore: Art-2 Gallery, p. 11, OCLC 225985814 : see Tan, "Han Sai Por", p. 3.
  41. ^ Han, Sculpture: see Tan Yen Peng (October 2005), Featured artist of the month: Han Sai Por, Sculpture Society (Singapore), p. 4, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 13 June 2009 .
  42. ^ Tay Swee Lin in Han Sai Por (2005).
  43. ^ Han, Four Dimensions, p. 11: see Tan, "Han Sai Por", p. 1.
  44. ^ Sandy Tan (30 June 1991), "A crack at art in a quarry", The Straits Times .
  45. ^ "Top Cultural Medallion awards go to two women", The Straits Times, 1 September 1995 ; Cultural Medallion, National Arts Council, 2008, archived from the original on 4 June 2009, retrieved 14 June 2009 .
  46. ^ Tee Hun Ching (22 October 2002), "Three women who inspire", The Straits Times ; Tee Hun Ching (29 November 2002), "Women of substance celebrated", The Straits Times .
  47. ^ a b CM recipient Han Sai Por at the XI Triennale – India, National Arts Council, 6 January 2005, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 14 June 2009 ; CM recipient Han Sai Por wins award at the XI Triennale – India, National Arts Council, 21 January 2005, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 14 June 2009 ; Clara Chow (3 February 2005), "Carving out a living", The Straits Times (Life!) ; Award winners of XI Triennale, Lalit Kala Akademi (National Academy of Art), 2005, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 14 June 2009 .
  48. ^ Mayo Martin (2 September 2008), "No rest for the winners: From movies to art and music, a range of creative works is being created", Today: 26 .
  49. ^ Susie Wong (15 November 1991), "Singapore sculpture", The Straits Times ; Sabapathy, Sculpture in Singapore.
  50. ^ Aw Yong Bee Yeng (18 February 1993), "Art of geometry", The Straits Times ; Han, Four Dimensions.
  51. ^ "An artistic journey to France by four", The Straits Times, 2 March 1993 ; T.K. Sabapathy (31 May 1993), "The new journey to the West", The Straits Times .
  52. ^ "Nanyang Top 40 at the museum", The Straits Times, 29 August 1998 .
  53. ^ Clarissa Oon (24 November 1998), "Go ahead and touch, get a feel for art", The Straits Times ; Lea Wee (23 February 1999), "Go ahead and touch it", The Straits Times .
  54. ^ Clara Chow (12 September 2001), "High tension", The Straits Times .
  55. ^ Sri Wahyuni (21 June 2002), "New collaborative dance contemplates lost scenery", The Jakarta Post: 18 ; Sri Wahyuni (26 June 2002), "Choreographer looks for lost scenery", The Jakarta Post: 20 .
  56. ^ "Weighty issue", The Straits Times, 13 March 2002 ; Cheah Ui-hoon (16 March 2002), "Rocked by monumental work", Business Times (Singapore) ; Han, Sculpture.
  57. ^ Selected Artworks by Han Sai Por and Ahmad Osni Peii, Sculpture Square, 2005, archived from the original on 14 June 2009, retrieved 14 June 2009 .
  58. ^ Sculpture Square presents 1 Singapore Artist: Han Sai Por, Sculpture Square (reproduced on Getforme Singapore), 2006, retrieved 14 June 2009 ; David Chew (17 January 2006), "A rock and a large place: Sculptor who thinks big scales down for latest show", Today: 40 ; Clara Chow (19 January 2006), "An artist's troubled images", The Straits Times (Life!) ; (Oasis by) 1 Singapore Artist: Han Sai Por, Boonscafe [blog], 12 February 2006, retrieved 14 June 2009 .
  59. ^ Tara Tan (18 December 2008), "Old school charm", The Straits Times (Life!) .

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Aw Yong, Bee Yeng (18 February 1993), "Art of geometry", The Straits Times .
  • "Exploring a versatile nature", Business Times (Singapore), 8 January 2000 .
  • Isa Ismail (20 June 2001), "Mentor way to help disabled artists", New Straits Times .
  • Lim, Richard (1998), Singapore Artists Speak, Singapore: Raffles Editions, ISBN 978-9971-0-0863-5 .
  • Sabapathy, T.K. (Spring 2002), "Singapore – Thoughts on Carving Stone: Han Sai Por", World Sculpture News 8 (2) .

External links[edit]