Hani Miletski

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Hani Miletski (born 1962) is a sexologist, and sex therapist living in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. She specializes as a trainer and supervisor in the field, in sex addiction, and also works within the criminal justice system.

Early life[edit]

Miletski was born in Israel, and according to her website, moved to the United States as part of the Israeli embassy staff as Assistant Senior Representative of the Defense Mission to the U.S. for Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Programs. She studied at The Catholic University of America and has a doctorate from the unaccredited Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality.

She worked within the Fogel Foundation from 1994 until 2003 before leaving to focus on her own private practice.

Published academic work[edit]

Miletski published the first brief overview of mother-son incest research. She shed light on a topic that has suffered societal neglect because of the taboo nature of incest, the widespread denial of all forms of female sexual aggression, and social double standards that impede recognition of female sex crimes. She shows that mother-son incest is more common than is thought and that most mothers who commit incest are sane.

Miletski is notable for her 1999 book on zoophilia,[1] which formally established "whether a genuine orientation might exist (as opposed to a mere sexual fetish), and whether previous research in the field had erred in not fully recognizing this".

Miletski's study has never been published in any peer-reviewed journal. She once published a two-page abstract of her findings in the Scandinavian Journal of Sexology.[2]

Books[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Review by Vern Bullough published in Journal of Sex Research, May 2003: (Online version)
  2. ^ Miletski, H. (2000) Bestiality and Zoophilia: An Exploratory Study. Scandinavian Journal of Sexology. Vol. 3 (4), pp 149–150: – Miletski's book "Understanding bestiality and zoophilia" (2002) was an expansion of her initial dissertation "Bestiality and Zoophilia: An exploratory study" (1999). An abstract of the latter was published in the Scandinavian Journal of Sexology (now discontinued), the official journal of the Nordic Association for Clinical Sexology (NACS). Peer review evidence according to Kinsey Institute of Sexology [1] "...an international, peer-reviewed, quarterly journal in English..." The paper was cited by a UK government report into extreme pornography in 2007, Ministry of Justice Research Series 11/07 [2]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]