Hanley Stafford

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Hanley Stafford
Hanley Stafford 1945.JPG
Stafford in 1945.
Born Alfred John Austin
(1899-09-22)September 22, 1899
Hanley, Staffordshire, England
Died September 9, 1968(1968-09-09) (aged 68)
Los Angeles, California, USA
Resting place
Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California
Occupation Radio, film, television actor
Spouse(s) Veola Vonn
Children One son

Hanley Stafford (born Alfred John Austin 22 September 1899 in Hanley, England, United Kingdom; died 9 September 1968, Los Angeles, California, USA) was an actor principally on radio.

He is remembered best for playing Lancelot Higgins on The Baby Snooks Show. Stafford also assumed the role of Mr. Dithers, the boss of Dagwood Bumstead on the Blondie radio program. He is commemorated by a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.[1]

Between 1950 and 1963, Stafford appeared on various television series, beginning with The Popsicle Parade of Stars and Hollywood Premiere Theatre (1950–51), and concluding with his role as Kenneth Westcott in the episode "Lucy Is a Chaperone" of CBS's The Lucy Show. In between, he was cast on episodes of the ABC/Warner Brothers series Cheyenne, Maverick, Sugarfoot, and 77 Sunset Strip, in the latter as Admiral Thomas Kyle in the 1962 episode "Dress Rehearsal". Stafford guest starred on the CBS sitcoms The Brothers, The Betty Hutton Show, and Angel, in which he portrayed Mr. Corwin in the 1961 episode "The Second Marriage". He was cast in 1957 as Colonel Farnsworth in "The Regina Wainwright Story" of CBS's The Millionaire.[2]

The 1940 U.S. Census records report him as living at 6200 Franklin Avenue in Hollywood, California, with his mother Emily Austin, 60, and his sister Anne Standing, 36, his age was given as 40. He reported his 1939 income to census takers as $5,000, the equivalent of $77,641 in 2010 dollars.

Stafford was married to radio actress Veola Vonn; the couple had one child, a son, Graham.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hollywood Star Walk of Fame". LA Times. Retrieved 10 June 2012. 
  2. ^ "Hanley Stafford". Internet Movie Data Base. Retrieved February 12, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Hanley Stafford Obituary". Hayward Review. 11 September 1968. Retrieved 10 June 2012. 

External links[edit]