Hans Meyer (footballer)

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Hans Meyer
Hansmeyer2007.jpg
Personal information
Full name Hans Meyer
Date of birth (1942-11-03) 3 November 1942 (age 71)
Place of birth Briesen, near Bílina, Czechoslovakia
Playing position Defender
Youth career
1952–1956 Motor Dietlas
1956–1961 Motor Suhl
1961–1963 FC Carl Zeiss Jena
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1963–1969 FC Carl Zeiss Jena 30 (1)
Teams managed
1971–1983 FC Carl Zeiss Jena
1984–1987 FC Rot-Weiß Erfurt
1988–1993 FC Karl-Marx-Stadt
1993–1994 FC Carl Zeiss Jena
1995 1. FC Union Berlin
1996–1999 FC Twente
1999–2003 Borussia Mönchengladbach
2004 Hertha BSC
2005–2008 1. FC Nürnberg
2008–2009 Borussia Mönchengladbach
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Hans Meyer (born 3 November 1942 in Briesen (today near Bílina, Czech Republic) is a German former football player and manager.[1] Meyer was featured on the cover of EA Sports' video game FUSSBALL MANAGER 08 (FIFA Manager 08, German version only).

Coaching career[edit]

Meyer is the only coach to win both the DFB-Pokal and the FDGB-Pokal. In 2001, Meyer led second-division club Borussia Mönchengladbach to promotion to the 1. Bundesliga, the first East German coach to achieve the feat with a West German side. Meyer next took the reins at Hertha BSC in mid-season in 2003, successfully leading the club through a protracted relegation fight. Following this feat he announced his retirement from coaching, turning down a contract extension with Hertha. Meyer found the thrill of the relegation battle too great to resist, however; he took over at last-place 1. FC Nürnberg in autumn of 2005, leading the squad to an eighth-place finish and firmly establishing his reputation as a "fireman" who could extinguish a team's crisis. His coaching success continued in the following season which ended with a sixth-place showing for Nürnberg and the capture of the DFB-Pokal. In the 2007–08 season, Meyer's luck had run out, and after a series of bruising defeats Nürnberg found itself in the drop zone once again. Meyer was fired by the club management on 11 February 2008.

Besides his talent as a trainer, he is famous for ironic and sarcastic answers in interviews. He remains very popular in Jena, where his career started, and in Nürnberg for winning the DFB-Pokal.

On 18 October 2008 he returned to Borussia Mönchengladbach and retired on 28 May 2009.[2]

Managerial record[edit]

As of 27 April 2012
Team From To Record
G W D L Win % Ref.
Carl Zeiss Jena 1 July 1971[3] 23 October 1983[3] 430 229 83 118 53.26
Rot-Weiß Erfurt 1 July 1984[4] 28 April 1987[4] 86 32 30 24 37.21
FC Karl-Marx-Stadt/
Chemnitzer FC
1
1 July 1988[5] 9 June 1993[5] 184 82 52 50 44.57
Carl Zeiss Jena 2 October 1993[3] 27 August 1994[3] 36 9 17 10 25.00
Union Berlin 25 January 1995[6] 2 October 1995[6] 27 17 6 4 62.96
FC Twente 1 January 1996[7] 6 September 1999[8] 151 69 35 47 45.70
Borussia Mönchengladbach 6 September 1999[8] 1 March 2003[9] 131 51 42 38 38.93 [10]
Hertha BSC 20 December 2003[11] 30 June 2004[12] 17 7 5 5 41.18 [13]
1. FC Nürnberg 9 November 2005[14] 12 February 2008[15] 91 33 31 27 36.26 [16]
Borussia Mönchengladbach 19 October 2008[17] 28 May 2009[18] 26 7 6 13 26.92 [10]
Total 1,179 536 307 336 45.46
  • 1.^ Same club with two different names.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hans Meyer" (in German). fussballdaten.de. Retrieved 24 January 2010. 
  2. ^ "Hans Meyer verlässt Mönchengladbach" [Hans Meyer leaves Mönchengladbach]. transfermarkt.de (in German). 28 May 2009. Retrieved 24 January 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d "FC Carl Zeiss Jena .:. Coaches from A-Z". Worldfootball. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Rot-Weiß Erfurt .:. Coaches from A-Z". Worldfootball. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "Chemnitzer FC .:. Coaches from A-Z". Worldfootball. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  6. ^ a b "1. FC Union Berlin .:. Coaches from A-Z". Worldfootball. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  7. ^ "FC Twente .:. Coaches from A-Z". Worldfootball. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "Hans Meyer neuer Trainer von Gladbach". kicker (in German). 6 September 1999. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  9. ^ "Hans Meyer zurückgetreten – Lienen übernimmt". kicker (in German). 1 March 2003. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Bor. Mönchengladbach" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 19 January 2014. 
  11. ^ "Hoeneß: "Mit Meyer die Klasse halten"". kicker (in German). 20 December 2003. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  12. ^ "Falko Götz beerbt Hans Meyer". kicker (in German). 5 May 2004. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  13. ^ "Hertha BSC" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 19 January 2014. 
  14. ^ "Hans Meyer übernimmt beim Club". kicker (in German). 9 November 2005. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  15. ^ "Thomas von Heesen beerbt Meyer". kicker (in German). 12 February 2008. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  16. ^ "1. FC Nürnberg" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 19 January 2014. 
  17. ^ "Meyer wieder in Gladbach". kicker (in German). 19 October 2008. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  18. ^ "Meyer räumt den Posten". kicker (in German). 28 May 2009. Retrieved 2 February 2013.