Hardyston Township, New Jersey

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Hardyston Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Hardyston
Map of Hardyston Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Hardyston Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hardyston Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hardyston Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°07′15″N 74°33′52″W / 41.120964°N 74.564328°W / 41.120964; -74.564328Coordinates: 41°07′15″N 74°33′52″W / 41.120964°N 74.564328°W / 41.120964; -74.564328[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Sussex
Royal charter February 25, 1762
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[7]
 • Type Special Charter
 • Mayor Leslie Hamilton (term ends December 31, 2013)[3][4]
 • Manager Marianne Smith[5]
 • Clerk Jane Bakalarczyk[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 32.638 sq mi (84.531 km2)
 • Land 31.972 sq mi (82.806 km2)
 • Water 0.666 sq mi (1.725 km2)  2.04%
Area rank 73rd of 566 in state
7th of 24 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 1,070 ft (330 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 8,213
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 8,089
 • Rank 279th of 566 in state
6th of 24 in county[13]
 • Density 256.9/sq mi (99.2/km2)
 • Density rank 489th of 566 in state
14th of 24 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07419 - Hamburg[14]
07460 - Stockholm[15]
Area code(s) 862/973
FIPS code 3403729850[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882269[18][2]
Website http://www.hardyston.com

Hardyston Township is a township in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 8,213,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 2,042 (+33.1%) from the 6,171 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 896 (+17.0%) from the 5,275 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Geography[edit]

Hardyston Township is located at 41°07′15″N 74°33′52″W / 41.120964°N 74.564328°W / 41.120964; -74.564328 (41.120964,-74.564328). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 32.638 square miles (84.531 km2), of which, 31.972 square miles (82.806 km2) of it is land and 0.666 square miles (1.725 km2) of it (2.04%) is water.[1][2]

In terms of physical geography, nearly all of Hardyston (excluding the portion of the township west of Hamburg along Route 94) lies within the New York – New Jersey Highlands, part of the greater Crystalline Appalachians that extend as far south as the Blue Ridge Mountains. Hardyston is home to portions of Hamburg Mountain (east of Franklin) and Pochuck Mountain (near Scenic Lakes) within this region. The remaining northwestern portion of the township lies within the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians. The prominent feature in the ridge-and-valley portion of the Township is the Wallkill Valley, through which the Wallkill River flows northeast to New York state.

History[edit]

Hardyston Township was set off from portions of Newton Township by Royal charter on February 25, 1762.[20][21] It was named after Josiah Hardy, who was royal governor of New Jersey from 1761–1763.[22] The original British spelling of Hardiston was Americanized to Hardyston after the American Revolutionary War.[23]

Hardyston was incorporated on February 21, 1798, by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature as one of New Jersey's original group of 104 townships. Over the centuries, portions of the township were taken to form Vernon Township (April 8, 1793), Sparta Township (April 14, 1845), Franklin (March 18, 1913) and Hamburg (March 19, 1920).[20]

It includes named places of Stockholm, Beaver Run, Beaver Mountain (not shown on maps), North Church, Big Springs, Holland (or Holland Mountain), Hardistonville, Rudeville, and Monroe. Postal ZIP codes covering Hardyston Township are 07460 Stockholm, 07416 Franklin Borough, 07419 Hamburg Borough, and a small part of 07848 Lafayette Township.

Hardyston was serviced first by the New Jersey Midland Railway, which built the station in Stockholm. However, there was a dispute over the name as that area was known as Snufftown because of the snuff factory along the Pequannock River, which provide the water power. Through a series of events between the residents of Stockholm and the railroad, the area eventually changed the name from Snufftown to Stockholm. Later, it was the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway, who provided service into the early 1960s when a mud slide removed a large section of trackage in West Milford Township and coupled with low productivity, the line was not repaired and service was disconnected. Today, the New York Susquehanna and Western Railway runs freight through Hardyston. The main highways are Route 23 and Route 94. A large eastern portion of the township is part of the Pequannock Watershed, which is owned by the City of Newark in Essex County for their water supply.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,702
1820 2,160 26.9%
1830 2,588 19.8%
1840 2,831 9.4%
1850 1,344 * −52.5%
1860 1,712 27.4%
1870 1,668 −2.6%
1880 2,645 58.6%
1890 2,542 −3.9%
1900 3,425 34.7%
1910 5,210 52.1%
1920 1,928 * −63.0%
1930 946 * −50.9%
1940 1,034 9.3%
1950 1,279 23.7%
1960 2,206 72.5%
1970 3,499 58.6%
1980 4,553 30.1%
1990 5,275 15.9%
2000 6,171 17.0%
2010 8,213 33.1%
Est. 2012 8,089 [12] −1.5%
Population sources:
1810-1920[24] 1840[25]
1850-1870[26] 1850[27] 1870[28]
1880-1890[29] 1890-1910[30] 1910-1930[31]
1930-1990[32] 2000[33][34] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,213 people, 3,255 households, and 2,376 families residing in the township. The population density was 256.9 per square mile (99.2 /km2). There were 3,783 housing units at an average density of 118.3 per square mile (45.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 91.65% (7,527) White, 2.61% (214) Black or African American, 0.17% (14) Native American, 3.01% (247) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.21% (99) from other races, and 1.35% (111) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.56% (457) of the population.[9]

There were 3,255 households, of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.9% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 22.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.97.[9]

In the township, 21.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 32.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.4 years. For every 100 females there were 94.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.2 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $81,655 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,575) and the median family income was $93,657 (+/- $14,035). Males had a median income of $70,592 (+/- $9,771) versus $42,899 (+/- $4,944) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,383 (+/- $2,894). About 3.5% of families and 6.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.3% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over.[35]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 6,171 people, 2,319 households, and 1,716 families residing in the township. The population density was 192.3 people per square mile (74.2/km2). There were 2,690 housing units at an average density of 83.8 per square mile (32.4/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 95.56% White, 0.84% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.57% Asian, 0.49% from other races, and 1.38% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.22% of the population.[33][34]

There were 2,319 households out of which 35.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.4% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.0% were non-families. 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.12.[33][34]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 31.9% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.7 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the township was $65,511, and the median income for a family was $72,199. Males had a median income of $51,503 versus $32,319 for females. The per capita income for the township was $28,457. About 2.7% of families and 4.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government[edit]

Hardyston Township operates under a Special Charter granted by the New Jersey Legislature. The government consists of a five-member Township Council elected at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the first week of January, the council selects a mayor and a deputy mayor from among its members.[7][36]

Local government[edit]

As of 2014, the members of the Hardyston Township Council are Mayor Stanley J. Kula (R, term as mayor ends December 31, 2014; term on committee ends in 2016), Deputy Mayor Carl B. Miller (R, term as deputy mayor ends December 31, 2014 and on committee ends 2015), Frank Cicerale (R, 2014), Santo Verrilli (R, 2016) and Leslie Hamilton (R, 2014).[4][37][38][39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hardyston Township is located in the 5th Congressional District[40] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[10][41][42]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[46][47]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[48][49] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[50] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[51]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[52] As of 2013, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2013),[53] Deputy Director Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[54] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2013),[55] Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015)[56] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[57][52] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[58] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott,[59] Sheriff Michael F. Strada[60] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[61][58] The County Administrator is John Eskilson[62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,487 registered voters in Hardyston Township, of which 870 (15.9% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,962 (35.8% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 2,652 (48.3% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[63] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 66.8% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 84.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[63][64]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 2,186 votes here (57.8% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,531 votes (40.5% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 55 votes (1.5% vs. 2.1%), among the 3,782 ballots cast by the township's 5,658 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.8% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[65] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,325 votes here (57.2% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,654 votes (40.7% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 65 votes (1.6% vs. 1.5%), among the 4,062 ballots cast by the township's 5,304 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.6% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,194 votes here (62.3% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,279 votes (36.3% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 34 votes (1.0% vs. 1.3%), among the 3,522 ballots cast by the township's 4,507 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.1% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[67]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,637 votes here (62.2% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 753 votes (28.6% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 205 votes (7.8% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 29 votes (1.1% vs. 1.3%), among the 2,633 ballots cast by the township's 5,287 registered voters, yielding a 49.8% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[68]

Education[edit]

Public school students in Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the schools of the Hardyston Township School District. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[69]) are Hardyston Township School (grades K-5, 410 students) and Hardyston Middle School (grades 6-8, 236 students).

For grades 9 - 12, public school students attend Wallkill Valley Regional High School which is also serves Franklin Borough, Hamburg Borough and Ogdensburg Borough, and is part of the Wallkill Valley Regional High School District.[70]

Wineries[edit]

Cemetery[edit]

The town contains North Church Cemetery / North Hardyston Cemetery. Notable burials there include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Township Council, Hardyston Township. Accessed April 30, 2014.
  5. ^ Township Manager, Hardyston Township. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  6. ^ Township Clerk, Hardyston Township. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  7. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 110.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Hardyston, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Hardyston township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Hardyston township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hamburg, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Stockholm, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  20. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 230. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  21. ^ Snell, James P. (1881) History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey, With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men and Pioneers. (Centennial ed., Harmony, NJ: Harmony Press, 1981, p. 335)
  22. ^ Haines, Alanson A. Hardyston Memorial: A History of The Township and the North Presbyterian Church, Hardyston, Sussex County, New Jersey. (New Jersey Herald Print, Newton, N.J., 1888, p. 19)
  23. ^ History of Sussex County, Sussex County Gen Web. Accessed September 30, 2007. "Hardyston is the American spelling of the British Hardiston, which was changed after the American Revolutionary War."
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 11, 2013.
  25. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  26. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 271, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed February 20, 2013. "Hardyston contained in 1850, 1,344 inhabitants; in 1860, 1,712; and in 1870, 1,668."
  27. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  28. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  29. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  30. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  31. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 7194. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  32. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 20, 2013.
  33. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Hardyston township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  34. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Hardyston township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  35. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Hardyston township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  36. ^ Form of Government, Hardyston Township. Accessed October 7, 2012. "In 1985, Hardyston Township voted by referendum to adopt the council-manager form of government, which combines the strong political leadership of an elected council with the managerial expertise of an appointed manager or administrator."
  37. ^ County Election Summary - General election November 2, 2010, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 8, 2010. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  38. ^ Summary Report - Group detail / General Election November 8, 2011, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 10, 2011. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  39. ^ County Summary With Detail - General Election: November 6, 2012, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  40. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  44. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  46. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  47. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  49. ^ District 24 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  50. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  52. ^ a b Sussex County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed April 25, 2013.
  53. ^ Richard A. Vohden, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  54. ^ Phillip R. Crabb, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  55. ^ George Graham, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed April 25, 2013.
  56. ^ Dennis J. Mudrick, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  57. ^ Gail Phoebus, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  58. ^ a b Miller, Jennifer Jean. "George Graham Chosen as Freeholder at Sussex County Republican Convention", TheAlternativePress.com, April 13, 2013. Accessed April 25, 2013. "Graham will fill the freeholder seat that New Jersey Assemblyman Parker Space left to take his new position. Space recently took the seat, which formerly belonged to Gary Chiusano, who in turn, was appointed to the spot of Sussex County Surrogate, following the retirement of Surrogate Nancy Fitzgibbons."
  59. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Clerk's Office. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  60. ^ Sheriff's Office, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  61. ^ Surrogate's Court, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed April 25, 2013.
  62. ^ County Administrator, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  63. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Sussex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  64. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  65. ^ General Election November 6, 2012: District Report - Group Detail, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  66. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  67. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  68. ^ 2009 Governor: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  69. ^ Data for Hardyston Township Public School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  70. ^ Home page, Wallkill Valley Regional High School. Accessed October 7, 2012. "We proudly serve the districts of: Franklin | Hamburg | Hardyston | Ogdensburg"
  71. ^ Samuel Fowler (1779–1844), Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 12, 2007.
  72. ^ Samuel Fowler (1851–1919), Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 12, 2007.
  73. ^ New Jersey Governor Daniel Haines, National Governors Association. Accessed August 12, 2007.
  74. ^ John Linn, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 12, 2007.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]