Hare-Less Wolf

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Hare-Less Wolf
Merrie Melodies , Bugs Bunny series
HareLessWolf Lobby Card.png
Lobby card
Directed by Friz Freleng
Produced by John Burton, Sr.
Voices by Mel Blanc
June Foray
(uncredited)
Music by Milt Franklyn
Animation by Gerry Chiniquy
Arthur Davis
Virgil Ross
Layouts by Hawley Pratt
Backgrounds by Boris Gorelick
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release date(s) February 1, 1958
Color process Technicolor
Running time 6:45
Language English
Preceded by Rabbit Romeo
Followed by Hare-Way to the Stars

Hare-Less Wolf is a 1958 Merrie Melodies cartoon starring Bugs Bunny and the absent-minded wolf character, Charles M. Wolf (voiced by Mel Blanc). An uncredited June Foray voices the wolf's wife, who appears in a brief scene at the beginning of the cartoon.

Plot[edit]

Charles M. Wolf is in his cave watching a baseball game on TV. Suddenly his wife burst in and demands he hunt a rabbit. Charles goes right away, rifle in hand muttering he hates his wife, getting a skillet tossed at his head.

Bugs Bunny catches Charles running and while running alongside, he asks him what the rush is. When asked if he's hunting for something, Charlie forgets what it is and Bugs openly guesses a rabbit. Charles shoots at Bugs, but Bugs dodges the shots and in a minute or two causes him to whack himself with his gun. Bugs tests the gun for any faults, but as he shoots Charles in the face, he concludes Charles is just a bad shot. Charles starts chasing Bugs around a tree and Bugs does another round of questions as Charles has forgotten it's a rabbit he's after. As Charles recalls, Bugs trips him over.

Bugs dives into his hole and leaves out a box. Charles finds inside it a hand grenade. Charlie reads a set of instructions to operate the grenade but takes too long after pulling the pin and it explodes in his face. Charles chases Bugs into a railroad tunnel. Charles runs out thinking a train is coming, but it's just Bugs holding a flashlight and blowing into a whistle. Having wised up, Charlie chases Bugs back into the tunnel, but a real train comes out of the tunnel and runs him over. Charles wonders why he ever wanted to catch a train.

Out of his hole, Bugs lights a nearby fuse and Charles curiously follows it. At the end of the fuse, Charles gets in the way of an explosive gunpowder keg, which blows up.

Bugs then builds a door on a plank of wood stretching out from a cliff. Charles demands to be let in and when Bugs refuses, he burst in and plummets off the cliff lying on the falling door. As Charles crashes into the ravine below, the impact makes Bugs almost fall off the plank, but Bugs manages to save himself. Charles rushes back up to Bugs and breathes heavily on Bugs' fur. Once again Charles forgets what he came after. This time Bugs then decides not to remind him and tells Charlie to let him know when he finally finds out, leaving Charlie to continue to guess.

Hours later into the night, way past dinnertime, Charlie is sitting on a rock, still trying to figure out what he wants. Bugs emerges from his hole in his night attire, holding a candle and he bids the audience goodnight.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Rabbit Romeo
Bugs Bunny Cartoons
1958
Succeeded by
Hare-Way to the Stars