Harold Franklyn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sir Harold Franklyn
HaroldFranklyn.jpg
General Sir Harold Franklyn
Born 28 November 1885
Died 31 March 1963
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Flag of the British Army.svg British Army
Rank General
Commands held 1st Bn West Yorkshire Regiment
Sudan Defence Force
5th Infantry Division
VIII Corps
British Troops in Northern Ireland
Home Forces
Battles/wars First World War
Second World War
Awards Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath
Distinguished Service Order
Military Cross

General Sir Harold Edmund Franklyn KCB DSO MC (28 November 1885 – 31 March 1963) was a British Army officer who commanded 5th Infantry Division.

Military career[edit]

Born the son of Lieutenant General Sir William Franklyn and educated at Rugby School and the Royal Military College Sandhurst,[1] Franklyn was commissioned into the Green Howards in 1905.[2] He served in the Great War in France and Belgium and took part in the Battle of Arras and Third Battle of Ypres.[1]

He became Commanding Officer of 1st Bn West Yorkshire Regiment in 1930.[2] He transferred to the Sudan Defence Force in 1933, initially as a General Staff Officer and then from 1935 as Commandant.[2] He was appointed General Officer Commanding 5th Infantry Division in 1938 and continued in that role into the Second World War,[2] leading his division at the Battle of Arras. Although the battle failed to stop the German progress, it influenced Gerd von Rundstedt to halt the German armour advancing on the Aa river on 24 May 1940. This allowed the French to establish defensive lines to the west of Dunkirk, permitting British and French forces to escape via the Channel port.[3] He was appointed Commander of VIII Corps on the South coast of the United Kingdom in 1940, General Officer Commanding the British Troops in Northern Ireland in 1941 and Commander-in-Chief, Home Forces in 1943 before he retired in 1945.[2]

In May 1946, he was appointed chairman of the Battles Nomenclature Committee for the Second World War.[4][5]

Family[edit]

In 1913 he married Monica Belfield; they had one daughter and one son.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c 21st Division 1914-18 - a divisional history
  2. ^ a b c d e Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives
  3. ^ Harmon 1981, p. 101
  4. ^ Battles Nomenclature Committee (1956) The Official names of the Battles, Actions and Engagements fought by the Land Forces of the Commonwealth during the Second World War, 1939–1945: Report of the Battles Nomenclature Committee as approved by the Army Council, London: HMSO, pp. 7–9
  5. ^ Battles Nomenclature Committee (1958) The Official names of the Battles, Actions and Engagements fought by the Land Forces of the Commonwealth during the Australian Campaign in the South-west Pacific 1942–1945 and the New Zealand Campaign in the South Pacific 1942–1944 and the Korean Campaign 1950–1953: Final report of the Battles Nomenclature Committee as approved by the Army Council, London: HMSO, p. 5
  • Harman, Nicholas. (1980) Dunkirk; the necessary myth. London: Hodder and Stoughton. ISBN 0-340-24299-X

External links[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
Guy Williams
General Officer Commanding the 5th Division
1938–1940
Succeeded by
Horatio Berney-Ficklin
Preceded by
New Post
GOC, VIII Corps
1940–1941
Succeeded by
Kenneth Anderson