Harold Stark

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This article is about the mathematician. For the American admiral, see Harold Rainsford Stark.
Harold M. Stark
Born (1939-08-06) August 6, 1939 (age 74)
Los Angeles, California
Fields Mathematics
Institutions University of Michigan
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
University of California, San Diego
Alma mater University of California, Berkeley
Doctoral advisor Derrick Henry Lehmer
Doctoral students Jeffrey Lagarias
M. Ram Murty
Andrew Odlyzko
Stefan Erickson
Notable awards American Academy of Arts and Sciences
United States National Academy of Sciences

Harold Mead Stark (born August 6, 1939, Los Angeles, California)[1] is an American mathematician, specializing in number theory. He is best known for his solution of the Gauss class number 1 problem, in effect correcting and completing the earlier work of Kurt Heegner; and for Stark's conjecture. He has recently collaborated with Audrey Terras on zeta functions in graph theory. He is currently on the faculty of the University of California at San Diego.

Stark received his bachelor's degree from California Institute of Technology in 1961 and his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in 1964. He was on the faculty at the University of Michigan from 1964 to 1968, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1968 to 1980, and at the University of California, San Diego from 1980 to the present.[2]

Stark was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1983 and to the United States National Academy of Sciences in 2007.[1][2] In 2012 he became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society.[3]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Stark, Harold M. (1978). An Introduction to Number Theory. Cambridge: MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-69060-7. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Biographies of Candidates 2007". Notices of the American Mathematical Society 54 (8): 1043–1057. September 2007. Retrieved 2009-05-25. 
  2. ^ a b "UC San Diego Mathematics Professor Elected to Prestigious National Academy of Sciences". University of California, San Diego. 2007-05-01. Retrieved 2009-05-25. [dead link]
  3. ^ List of Fellows of the American Mathematical Society, retrieved 2013-08-05.

External links[edit]