Harris–Benedict equation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Harris–Benedict equation (also called the Harris-Benedict principle) is a method used to estimate an individual's basal metabolic rate (BMR) and daily kilocalorie requirements. The estimated BMR value is multiplied by a number that corresponds to the individuals's activity level. The resulting number is the recommended daily kilocalorie intake to maintain current body weight.

The Harris–Benedict equation may be used to assist weight loss — by reducing the kilocalorie intake to a number below the estimated maintenance intake of the equation.[citation needed]

Step 1 – calculating the BMR[edit]

The original Harris–Benedict equations published in 1918 and 1919.[1][2]

Men BMR = 66.473 + (13.7516 x weight in kg) + (5.0033 x height in cm) – (6.7550 x age in years)
Women BMR = 655.0955 + (9.5634 x weight in kg) + (1.8496 x height in cm) – (4.6756 x age in years)

The Harris–Benedict equations revised by Roza and Shizgal in 1984.[3]

Men BMR = 88.362 + (13.397 x weight in kg) + (4.799 x height in cm) - (5.677 x age in years)
Women BMR = 447.593 + (9.247 x weight in kg) + (3.098 x height in cm) - (4.330 x age in years)

Step 2 – applying the Harris-Benedict Principle[edit]

The following table enables calculation of an individual's recommended daily kilocalorie intake to maintain current weight.[4]

Little to no exercise Daily kilocalories needed = BMR x 1.2
Light exercise (1–3 days per week) Daily kilocalories needed = BMR x 1.375
Moderate exercise (3–5 days per week) Daily kilocalories needed = BMR x 1.55
Heavy exercise (6–7 days per week) Daily kilocalories needed = BMR x 1.725
Very heavy exercise (twice per day, extra heavy workouts) Daily kilocalories needed = BMR x 1.9

History[edit]

The Harris–Benedict equation sprang from a study by James Arthur Harris and Francis Gano Benedict, which was published in 1919 by the Carnegie Institution of Washington in the monograph A Biometric Study Of Basal Metabolism In Man.

See also[edit]

Cited sources[edit]

  1. ^ A Biometric Study of Human Basal Metabolism. J. Arthur Harris and Francis G. Benedict. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 12 (December 1918): 370–373.
  2. ^ A Biometric Study of Basal Metabolism in Man. J. Arthur Harris and Francis G. Benedict. Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution, 1919.
  3. ^ The Harris Benedict equation reevaluated. A.M. Roza and H.M. Shizgal. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 40, No. 1 (July 1984): 168-182.
  4. ^ Harris Benedict formula for women and men. GottaSport.com. Retrieved on 2011-10-27.

External links[edit]

BMR Calculators