Harris, Missouri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Harris, Missouri
City
Location of Harris, Missouri
Location of Harris, Missouri
Coordinates: 40°18′19″N 93°21′1″W / 40.30528°N 93.35028°W / 40.30528; -93.35028Coordinates: 40°18′19″N 93°21′1″W / 40.30528°N 93.35028°W / 40.30528; -93.35028
Country United States
State Missouri
County Sullivan
Area[1]
 • Total 0.15 sq mi (0.39 km2)
 • Land 0.15 sq mi (0.39 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 892 ft (272 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 61
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 60
 • Density 406.7/sq mi (157.0/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 64645
Area code(s) 660
FIPS code 29-30466[4]
GNIS feature ID 0719142[5]

Harris is a city in Sullivan County, Missouri, United States. The population was 61 at the 2010 census, at which time it was a town.

History[edit]

Harris was named for A. W. Harris, an early settler.[6]

Ens. John Charles England was born in Harris Missouri on 11 December 1920. He enlisted in the Naval Reserve in September 1940 and received his commission as a Naval officer in June 1941. Ensign England joined the crew of the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) in September 1941. He lost his life a few months later when that ship was sunk during the Japanese air raid on Pearl Harbor.

Wikipedia: "On the morning of December 7, 1941, just four days from his 21st birthday John C. England volunteered to work in the ship's radio room for a friend so that he might have more time with his family when they arrived. That morning the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and the USS Oklahoma was one of their first targets. Oklahoma was moored at Battleship Row 7, outboard alongside Maryland. USS Oklahoma took 3 torpedo hits almost immediately after the first Japanese bombs fell. As she began to capsize, 2 more torpedoes struck home, and her men were strafed as they abandoned ship. Within 20 minutes after the attack began, she had swung over until halted by her masts touching bottom, her starboard side above water, and a part of her keel clear.

Ensign England survived the initial attack and escaped topside as the ship was capsizing. He remembered the men still in the radio room. He returned three times to the radio room, each time guiding a man to safety. He left to go back below decks for the fourth time and was never seen again. He was one of twenty officers and 395 enlisted men who were killed on board USS Oklahoma that morning. Ensign England's gallant effort saved three men, but cost him his life."

Two U.S. Navy ships have been named in honor of Ensign John Charles England: the escort ship England (DE-635), 1943-1946; and the guided missile frigate (later reclassified as a guided missile cruiser) England (DLG/CG-22), 1963-1994.

Geography[edit]

Harris is located at 40°18′19″N 93°21′01″W / 40.305385°N 93.350269°W / 40.305385; -93.350269.[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.15 square miles (0.39 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 336
1910 395 17.6%
1920 370 −6.3%
1930 313 −15.4%
1940 263 −16.0%
1950 181 −31.2%
1960 171 −5.5%
1970 174 1.8%
1980 116 −33.3%
1990 102 −12.1%
2000 105 2.9%
2010 61 −41.9%

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 61 people, 30 households, and 14 families residing in the city. The population density was 406.7 inhabitants per square mile (157.0/km2). There were 50 housing units at an average density of 333.3 per square mile (128.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.4% White and 1.6% from two or more races.

There were 30 households of which 36.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 23.3% were married couples living together, 16.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 53.3% were non-families. 50.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.03 and the average family size was 2.64.

The median age in the city was 32.5 years. 32.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 13.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.4% were from 25 to 44; 22.9% were from 45 to 64; and 9.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.8% male and 49.2% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 105 people, 44 households, and 28 families residing in the town. The population density was 676.1 people per square mile (253.4/km²). There were 49 housing units at an average density of 315.5/sq mi (118.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.19% White, 0.95% Native American, 0.95% from other races, and 1.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.67% of the population.

There were 44 households out of which 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.9% were married couples living together, 20.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.1% were non-families. 34.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the town the population was spread out with 33.3% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 10.5% from 45 to 64, and 21.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 101.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.4 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $20,500, and the median income for a family was $28,438. Males had a median income of $25,625 versus $13,750 for females. The per capita income for the town was $7,952. There were 20.0% of families and 15.9% of the population living below the poverty line, including 10.4% of under eighteens and 26.7% of those over 64.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1918). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 366. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 

External links[edit]