Harris Mylonas

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Harris Mylonas is an assistant professor of political science and international affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University.[1] He is the author of The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees, and Minorities, which was awarded The Peter Katzenstein Book Prize in September 2013[2] and the 2014 European Studies Book Award by the Council for European Studies.[3] He is currently working on another book project, The Strategic Logic of Diaspora Management.[4]

Mylonas has contributed to the ideas of nation-building, state-building, and multilateralism through different publications and articles.[5] He has also contributed to the analysis of the Greek government-debt crisis.[6] He is also one of four vice-presidents of the Association for the Study of Nationalities, an academic association dedicated to the understanding of ethnicity and nationalism with a geographic focus in Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe, and Eurasia.[7] He is an Associate editor for Nationalities Papers, a peer-reviewed academic journal published by Routledge.[8]

Academic career[edit]

Mylonas completed his undergraduate degree at The University of Athens, received an M.A. in political science from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in political science from Yale University. He has been an assistant professor of political science and international affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University since 2009.[9] He served as an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs in 2008-09 and 2011-12 academic years.[10]

Selected Publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Google scholar profile.
  2. ^ "Peter Katzenstein Book Prize". PONARS Eurasia. Retrieved 13 September 2013. 
  3. ^ "European Studies Book Award". Council for European Studies. Retrieved 6 March 2014. 
  4. ^ Mylonas, Harris. "Homepage". Retrieved 13 September 2013. 
  5. ^ Harris Mylonas. “Whither Nation-Building?e-International Relations, May 8th 2013; Harris Mylonas. “The Challenges of Nation-Building in the Syrian Arab Republic”, in The Political Science of Syria’s War, POMEPS Briefing #22, December 18th 2013, pp. 57-59; Harris Mylonas. 2013. “Revisiting the Link: Politicizing Religion in Democratizing Countries”, Harvard International Review, Vol. 34, Issue 4 (Spring), pp. 48-52; Harris Mylonas and Emirhan Yorulmazlar. "Regional multilateralism: The next paradigm in global affairs", CNN.com, January 14th 2011; Thomas Meaney and Harris Mylonas."The Pandora's box of sovereignty", Los Angeles Times, August 13th 2008; Wilder Bullard and Harris Mylonas. “This is no 1989 moment for the Arab world”, Guardian.co.uk, February 8 2011; Keith Darden and Harris Mylonas. "The Promethean Dilemma in Third-Party Nation-Building", The Monkey Cage, September 20th 2012.
  6. ^ Harris Mylonas. 2014. "Democratic Politics in Times of Austerity: The Limits of Forced Reform in Greece," Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 12, No. 2 (June): 435-443; Harris Mylonas. 2013. “Greece,” European Journal of Political Research Political Data Yearbook, Volume 52, Issue 1: 87–95; George Th. Mavrogordatos and Harris Mylonas. 2012. “Greece,” European Journal of Political Research Political Data Yearbook, Volume 51, Issue 1: 122-128; George Th. Mavrogordatos and Harris Mylonas. 2011. “Greece,” European Journal of Political Research Political Data Yearbook, Volume 50, Issue 7-8: 985-990; Harris Mylonas. 2011. "Is Greece a Failing Developed State?" in Botsiou, Konstantina E.; Klapsis, Antonis (eds.) The Konstantinos Karamanlis Institute for Democracy Yearbook 2011: The Global Economic Crisis and the Case of Greece. Springer.
  7. ^ "Board of Directors". Association for the Study of Nationalities. Retrieved 13 September 2013. 
  8. ^ Nationalities Papers website. Retrieved 13 September 2013.
  9. ^ Mylonas, Harris. "Elliott School of International Affairs". Retrieved 5 June 2014. 
  10. ^ Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies website. Retrieved 13 September 2013.

External links[edit]