Harrison, Ohio

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Not to be confused with Harrison County, Ohio.
Harrison, Ohio
City
Harrison from the east. West Harrison, Indiana, is the northernmost portion. The state line runs almost horizontally near the top of the picture, along State Street and just below the river.
Harrison from the east. West Harrison, Indiana, is the northernmost portion. The state line runs almost horizontally near the top of the picture, along State Street and just below the river.
Location in Hamilton County and the state of Ohio.
Location in Hamilton County and the state of Ohio.
Coordinates: 39°15′29″N 84°48′16″W / 39.25806°N 84.80444°W / 39.25806; -84.80444Coordinates: 39°15′29″N 84°48′16″W / 39.25806°N 84.80444°W / 39.25806; -84.80444
Country United States
State Ohio
County Hamilton
Area[1]
 • Total 4.96 sq mi (12.85 km2)
 • Land 4.92 sq mi (12.74 km2)
 • Water 0.04 sq mi (0.10 km2)
Elevation[2] 522 ft (159 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 9,897
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 10,103
 • Density 2,011.6/sq mi (776.7/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45030
Area code(s) 513
FIPS code 39-33838[5]
GNIS feature ID 1041362[2]
Website www.harrisonohio.org

Harrison is a city in Hamilton County, Ohio, United States. The city is located in the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky metropolitan area. The population was 9,897 as of the 2010 census.[6]

History[edit]

Harrison was named after the 9th US President, William Henry Harrison. It was incorporated in 1850, and became a city in 1981.

Harrison Township was established in 1850, formerly part of Crosby Township.[citation needed] Among the historic sites in the city's vicinity is the Eighteen Mile House, which was built during the earliest years of the nineteenth century.[7]

Harrison was the home of Ohio's fifth governor Othneil Looker.

It was one of the few stops in Ohio on the Whitewater Canal, built between 1836 and 1847, which spanned a distance of 76 miles (122 km).

On July 13, 1863, Morgan's Raiders, a Confederate cavalry force, invaded. The column passed through taking fresh horses and burning the bridge over the Whitewater River near the southwest part of the town.

The first train came to Harrison Township in 1864. In 1882 Harrison Depot was built at West Broadway and Railroad Avenue. It later burned to the ground.

Harrison Village Park is the final resting place for a small number of veterans of the Revolutionary War. In the center of the park is a bandstand. Prior to it being a bandstand it was a fountain. In the early 1930s the fountain was drained and filled in and made a bandstand. It seems many children came down with cases of impetigo after spending a hot summer swimming in the fountain full of untreated water.

In 1940 the dog track in West Harrison closed due to pressure from the horse racing circuit. Monkeys in silk jackets had been used as jockeys for the dogs. The track had originally opened in 1932, when parimutuel betting was illegal in Indiana. However, during the Depression, heads were turned as the track attracted revenue to the area and was one of the highest paying local jobs at $12 a week.

Parts of the city were devastated on June 2, 1990, by an F4 tornado, but were quickly rebuilt.

Local government[edit]

Harrison's Mayor is Joel McGuire, an attorney, former Army Ranger, and former member of Harrison City Council. On November 6, 2007, McGuire (Independent) defeated incumbent mayor Daniel Gieringer (Democrat) by a vote of 58.7% to 41.3%. On November 8, 2011, McGuire was re-elected to another four-year term as Mayor, receiving 46.5% of the vote in an election against former city councilman Matt Hiatt and former Mayor Daniel Gieringer.

Harrison has a city council made up of seven members (Ryan Grubbs, Tony Burkart, Mark Louis, Hank Menninger, William Neyer, Jim Robertson and Randy Shank) who are elected to four-year terms.

Its police department is an accredited department with 20 sworn officers and three civilian personnel. It is headed by Col. Charles Lindsey, Chief of Police.

The Fire Department is headed by Chief Rob Hursong. The Harrison Fire Department is a combination department with forty-nine employees, twenty-two of which are full-time and twenty-seven part-time. The Harrison Fire Department coverage areas consist of 44 square miles (110 km2) in Ohio and Indiana resulting in 2100 Fire and EMS details annually.

Geography[edit]

Harrison is located at 39°15′29″N 84°48′16″W / 39.25806°N 84.80444°W / 39.25806; -84.80444 (39.257931, -84.804535).[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.96 square miles (12.85 km2), of which, 4.92 square miles (12.74 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) is water.[1]

Harrison is adjacent to Miami Whitewater Forest, the second park to join the Hamilton County Park District in 1949. It now spans 4,345 acres (17.58 km2).

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,560
1890 1,690 8.3%
1900 1,456 −13.8%
1910 1,368 −6.0%
1920 1,309 −4.3%
1930 1,449 10.7%
1940 1,656 14.3%
1950 1,943 17.3%
1960 3,878 99.6%
1970 4,408 13.7%
1980 5,855 32.8%
1990 7,518 28.4%
2000 7,487 −0.4%
2010 9,897 32.2%
Est. 2012 10,103 2.1%
Sources:[9][10][11][12][13][5][14]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 9,897 people, 3,765 households, and 2,659 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,011.6 inhabitants per square mile (776.7 /km2). There were 4,054 housing units at an average density of 824.0 per square mile (318.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.6% White, 0.3% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 0.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population.

There were 3,765 households of which 37.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.7% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 29.4% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.12.

The median age in the city was 34.7 years. 26.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.1% were from 25 to 44; 24.3% were from 45 to 64; and 11.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.7% male and 51.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 7,487 people, 2,717 households, and 2,005 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,024.5 people per square mile (781.3/km²). There were 2,847 housing units at an average density of 769.8 per square mile (297.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.18% White, 0.17% African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.39% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.20% from other races, and 0.95% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.52% of the population.

There were 2,717 households out of which 41.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.6% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.2% were non-families. 22.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the city the population was spread out with 29.9% under the age of 18, 9.9% from 18 to 24, 31.4% from 25 to 44, 19.4% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 93.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $46,107, and the median income for a family was $54,028. Males had a median income of $37,455 versus $27,418 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,966. About 4.3% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.6% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over.

Schools[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Harrison city, Ohio". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved October 30, 2012. 
  7. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  10. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 

External links[edit]