Harry Bernstein

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Harry Bernstein
Born (1910-05-30)May 30, 1910
Stockport, England
United Kingdom
Died June 3, 2011(2011-06-03) (aged 101)
Brooklyn, New York City
United States
Occupation Writer
Nationality American
Period 2007–2011
Genres Non-fiction

Harry Louis Bernstein (May 30, 1910 – June 3, 2011) was a British-born American writer whose first published book, The Invisible Wall: A Love Story That Broke Barriers, dealt with his long suffering mother Ada's struggles to feed her six children; an abusive, alcoholic father, Yankel; the anti-Semitism Bernstein and his Jewish neighbors encountered growing up in a Cheshire mill town (Stockport, now part of Greater Manchester) in northwest England; the loss of Jews and Christians from the community in World War I; and the Romeo and Juliet-like romance experienced by his sister Lily and her Christian boyfriend. The book was started when Bernstein was 93 and published in 2007, when he was 96. The loneliness he encountered following the death of his wife, Ruby, in 2002, after 67 years of marriage, was the catalyst for Bernstein to begin work on his book. His second book, The Dream, published in 2008, centered on his family’s move to the West Side of Chicago in 1922 when he was twelve. In 2009, Bernstein published his third book, The Golden Willow, which chronicled his married life and later years. A fourth book, What Happened to Rose, will be published posthumously in 2012.

Before his retirement at age 62, Bernstein worked for various movie production companies, reading scripts and working as a magazine editor for trade magazines. He also wrote freelance articles for such publications as Popular Mechanics, Family Circle and Newsweek.

Bernstein lived in Brick Township, New Jersey.[1] He died at the age of 101, on June 3, 2011.[2]

Quote[edit]

"You've got to be taught to hate. You've got to be taught from the time you're six or seven or eight. It's put in your mind. It's handed down, almost like a heirloom, among Christians. They didn't know why they hated us."

References[edit]

Sources[edit]