Harry Broudy

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Harry S. Broudy (July 27, 1905 – June 24, 1998) is a Polish-born educator.

Broudy attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston University where he received his Bachelors Degree in German literature and philosophy in 1929. From there, he went to Harvard University and earned his Masters degree in 1933 and his Ph.D in 1936 (both in philosophy). After earning his doctorate in Philosophy, he supervised for the Massachusetts Department of Education. From 1937 to 1957, he taught philosophy of education and educational psychology at a couple of Massachusetts state teacher colleges. From 1957 to 1974, he was a professor at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign teaching philosophy of education.

Broudy's philosophical views were based on the tradition of classical realism, dealing with truth, goodness, and beauty. However he was also influenced by the modern philosophy existentialism and instrumentalism. In his textbook Building a Philosophy of Education he has two major ideas that are the main points to his philosophical outlook: The first is truth and the second is universal structures to be found in humanity's struggle for education and the good life. Broudy also studied issues on society's demands on school. He thought education would be a link to unify the diverse society and urged the society to put more trust and a commitment to the schools and a good education.