Harry Lennix

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Harry Lennix
Harry Lennix by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Lennix at the San Diego Comic Con International in San Diego, California, July 20, 2013
Born Harry Joseph Lennix III
(1964-11-16) November 16, 1964 (age 50)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1989–present

Harry Joseph Lennix III[1] (born November 16, 1964) is an American actor. He is best known for his roles as Terrence "Dresser" Williams in the Robert Townsend film The Five Heartbeats (1991) and as Boyd Langton in the Joss Whedon television series Dollhouse. Lennix currently co-stars as Harold Cooper, Assistant Director of the FBI Counterterrorism Division, on the NBC drama The Blacklist.

Early life[edit]

The youngest of four siblings, Lennix was born in Chicago, Illinois to Lillian C. (née Vines), a laundress, and Harry Lennix, Jr., a machinist[2][3] and a Creole from Louisiana.[4] Lennix attended Quigley Preparatory Seminary South and Northwestern University, where he majored in Acting and Direction. In his senior year at Northwestern, he was the coordinator of the African-American student organization, For Members Only.[5] He taught music and civics for several years in the Chicago Public School system and is a frequent lecturer.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

Lennix starred in the Showtime Networks made-for-cable television film Keep the Faith, Baby (2002) as Rev. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., who was a legendary Harlem Congressman from 1944 to 1972; in the movie Titus (1999), based on Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus, as Aaron the Moor; and in the ABC television series Commander in Chief. Lennix currently co-stars as Harold Cooper, Assistant Director of the FBI Counterterrorism Division, on the NBC drama The Blacklist, which debuted September 23, 2013.

In film, Lennix has had supporting roles such as The Five Heartbeats (1991), Get on the Bus (1996), Love & Basketball (2000), The Matrix series (1999-2003), Ray (2004), Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004), Stomp the Yard (2007), and State of Play (2009).

In television, he had a recurring role in Diagnosis: Murder as Agent Ron Wagner as well as a voice-over role in the Legion of Super Heroes animated series. He also had a recurring role in the sixth season of 24 as fictional Muslim civil rights activist Walid Al-Rezani. He appeared on the series House M.D. as a paralyzed jazz trumpet player, and in six episodes of ER as Dr. Greg Fischer.[6] He also appeared in the episode "The Blame Game" of the first season of Ally McBeal. He played the parts of Boyd Langton in Joss Whedon's series Dollhouse[7] and U.S. president Barack Obama in the comedy sketch show Little Britain USA.

In 2007, he was an official festival judge at the first annual Noor Iranian Film Festival.

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1989 Package, TheThe Package Field Soldier
1989 Mother's Courage:
The Mary Thomas Story, A
A Mother's Courage:
The Mary Thomas Story
Nero Television film
1990 The Case of the Defiant Daughter Prosecutor Keith Warner Television film
1991 Five Heartbeats, TheThe Five Heartbeats Dresser
1992 Mo' Money Tom Dilton as Harry J. Lennix
1992 Bob Roberts Franklin Dockett
1992 In the Best Interest of the Children Tim Coffey Television film
1994 Vanishing Son II Andre Laine Television film
1994 Vanishing Son IV Andre Laine Television film
1994 Guarding Tess Kenny Young
1995 Clockers Bill Walker
1996 Get on the Bus Randall
1997 Chicago Cab, aka Hellcab Irate Boyfriend as Harry J. Lennix
1999 Titus Aaron Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture Drama
2002 Pumpkin Robert Meary
2002 Collateral Damage Dray
2002 Keep the Faith, Baby Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Television film
Black Reel Award for Best Actor in a Television Movie/Mini-Series
Nominated—NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Television Movie, Mini-Series or Dramatic Special
Nominated—Satellite Award for Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film
2003 Human Stain, TheThe Human Stain Mr. Silk
2003 Matrix Reloaded, TheThe Matrix Reloaded Commander Lock
2003 Matrix Revolutions, TheThe Matrix Revolutions Commander Lock
2004 Chrystal Kalid
2004 Barbershop 2: Back in Business Quentin Leroux
2004 Suspect Zero Rich Charleton
2004 Ray Joe Adams Nominated—Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
2006 Sharif Don't Like It Tom
2007 Stomp the Yard Nate
2007 Resurrecting the Champ Bob Satterfield, Jr.
2007 Across the Universe Army Sergeant
2009 State of Play Det. Donald Bell
2010 Mr. Sophistication Ron Waters
2012 A Beautiful Soul Jeff Freeze
2013 H4 King Henry IV
2013 Man of Steel General Swanwick
2014 Cru (C.R.U.) Diego Glass - 2015 Justice League: Throne of Atlantis Black Manta Voice
2016 Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice General Swanwick

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1995–1996 The Client Daniel Holbrook 3 episodes
1997 ER Dr. Greg Fischer 6 episodes
1997–1998 Diagnosis Murder Agent Ron Wagner 6 episodes
1997 Living Single Clayton Simmons Episode: "The Best Laid Plans"
1998 Ally McBeal Ballard Episode: "The Blame Game"
1998 The Practice Dr. Cloves's attorney Episode: "The Pursuit of Dignity"
1999 Judging Amy Mr. Newman Episode: "An Impartial Bias"
1999 JAG Agent John Nichols Episode: "Contemptuous Words"
2003 The Practice Asst. Attorney General Parker Episode: "Final Judgment"
2005 House M.D. John Henry Giles Episode: "DNR"
2005–2006 Commander in Chief Jim Gardner 19 episodes
Nominated—NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series
2007 24 Walid Al-Rezani 5 episodes
2008 Little Britain USA President of the United States 4 episodes
2009–2010 Dollhouse Boyd Langton Series regular: 25 episodes
2011 Law & Order: LA Agent Bossy Episode: "Plummer Park"
2012–2013 Emily Owens M.D. Tim Dupre 6 episodes
2013–present The Blacklist Harold Cooper Series regular
2013 "Quickdraw" Sheriff Nat Love Episode: "Nicodemus"

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Djena Graves and Harry Lennix III". The New York Times. June 28, 2009. 
  2. ^ Herguth, Bob (April 16, 1991). "Harry J. Lennix". Chicago Sun-Times. 
  3. ^ Harry J. Lennix Biography (1965?-)
  4. ^ Harrison, Eric (January 14, 2000). "In 'Titus,' He's the Face of Pure Evil; Movies * Harry J. Lennix's role in Julie Taymor's film should bring him more opportunities--and recognition". Los Angeles Times. 
  5. ^ "Harry Lennix". SpeakingOfStories.org. 
  6. ^ Template:Cite eb
  7. ^ Dos Santos, Kristin; Jennifer Godwin (April 15, 2008). "Exclusive Pilot Details: Welcome to the Dollhouse!". E! Online. Retrieved 2008-04-16. 

External links[edit]